Charro!


1h 38m 1969
Charro!

Brief Synopsis

A reformed outlaw takes on his former cohorts to defend a Western town.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
San Antonio, Texas, opening: 13 Mar 1969
Production Company
Cinema Center Films
Distribution Company
National General Pictures Corporation
Country
United States
Location
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA; Superstition Mountain, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In 1870, reformed outlaw Jess Wade is tricked into believing that his former girl friend Tracy urgently wants to see him. Riding into a small Mexican border town, Jess is captured by the band of outlaws, led by Vince and his deranged brother Billy Roy, that he had abandoned a year before in order to lead an honest life. Jess is taken to the gang's mountain hideout and shown the legendary Victory Gun--the cannon that fired the last shot against Maximilian and won freedom for Mexico--as well as a counterfeit poster proclaiming that he is wanted dead or alive by both Mexico and the United States for the theft of the cannon. Jess manages to get away, and he seeks safety in the village of Rio Seco, where Tracy operates the local saloon and Sheriff Ramsey is a trusted friend. Billy Roy appears on the scene and seriously wounds the sheriff in a gunfight. After subduing Billy Roy and dragging him off to jail, Jess arms the townspeople for a possible attack by Vince's gang. But Vince eliminates outside reinforcements by ambushing a platoon of Mexican cavalry, and he threatens to turn the Victory Gun on Rio Seco unless Billy Roy is freed. To back up his warning, Vince fires several shots which topple the church steeple and kill Sheriff Ramsey. Jess takes Billy Roy up to the mountain hideout when the panic-stricken citizens insist that the prisoner be released. During the fighting that ensues, several gang members are slain, and Billy Roy is killed when the wagon holding the cannon breaks loose and crushes him. Jess takes the defeated prisoner and drives the cannon wagon back into Rio Seco. Although the grateful townspeople ask Jess to remain on as sheriff, he declines, stating that he must take the cannon and Vince back to Mexico. Before riding out of town, however, Jess promises Tracy that he will send for her.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
San Antonio, Texas, opening: 13 Mar 1969
Production Company
Cinema Center Films
Distribution Company
National General Pictures Corporation
Country
United States
Location
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA; Superstition Mountain, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Quotes

He'll be a lot quieter when that swelling goes down.
- Jess Wade
Swelling from WHAT?
- Billy Roy Hackett
That bump on your head.
- Jess Wade
I ain't got no bump on my head.
- Billy Roy Hackett
You have now!
- Jess Wade
You won't be needing my tender care anymore You're free to go, Jess. Anywhere where the Mexican law or Mexican federales can't find you. Or any place north where the American law or the American cavalry can't run you down. You're a famous man, Jess. Don't ever forget it.
- Vince Hackett
I won't.
- Jess Wade
If a woman's eyes are blue, she'll be sweet and true to you. But if a woman's eyes are green, she'll turn hot, or cold, or mean!
- Billy Roy Hackett
We've got us a timetable, Gunner.
- Vince Hackett
Well call it, Vince.
- Gunner
Already have. Billy Roy let loose by sundown. All right get that gun down this hill until it's a quarter mile from town.
- Vince Hackett
Down that hill down there? That ain't a hill, Vince that's a cliff.
- Gunner

Trivia

This is the only movie in which Elvis Presley doesn't sing. The only song is the one during the titles.

The original title for this film was "Come Sundown, Come Hell". The title was changed to "Charro!" prior to the film's release.

Notes

Although press materials and the Variety review credit Alan and Marilyn Bergman with the lyrics to "Charro," the film's soundtrack album and the music copyright credit Billy Strange and Scott Davis. The film was shot on location in Arizona at Superstition Mountain and Apache Junction.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 1969

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1988

Released in United States Spring March 1969

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1988