Back To The Future


1h 56m 1985
Back To The Future

Brief Synopsis

A young man travels into the past and almost keeps his parents from getting married.

Film Details

Also Known As
Regreso al futuro, Retour vers le futur, Tillbaka till framtiden
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Period
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m

Synopsis

"Back to the Future" (1985) follows a boy, played by Michael J. Fox, and his a rough life in high school after being tormented by the principal, and a rough relationship with his father. When he befriends a scientist, played by Christopher Lloyd, he finds out that he is working on a time machine and is accidentally sent to the 1950s. He interferes with the romance of his parents, and must get them reunited to ensure his own existence back in the 1980s. "Back to the Future" has cemented itself as a 1980s classic.

Crew

Sam Adams

Special Effects

Dick Babin

Dolly Grip

F D Ballard

Song

Hank Ballard

Song

Jesse Belvin

Song

Chuck Berry

Song

Cameron Birnie

Set Designer

Thomas W. Blackburn

Song

Mitchell Bock

Assistant Director

Tim Brennon

Grip

George Bruns

Song

Clyde E Bryan

Assistant Camera Operator

Lindsey Buckingham

Song Performer

Lindsey Buckingham

Song

Richard Butler

Stunts

Bill Butlin

Swing Gang

Carl Butz

Other

Dorothy Byrne

Hair

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

James Campbell

Original Music

Neil Canton

Producer

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Richard Caulkins

Animal Trainer

Ken Chase

Makeup

Richard Chronister

Special Effects

Eric Clapton

Song

Eric Clapton

Song Performer

Jeffrey R Coates

Production Associate

Ron Cobb

Consultant

Johnny Colla

Song

Dan Cooper

Dolly Grip

Bob Cornell

Transportation Captain

Samuel C Crutcher

Sound Editor

Dean Cundey

Director Of Photography

Dean Cundey

Dp/Cinematographer

Mario D'alfonso

Other

Ernie Depew

Construction Coordinator

Ernie Dodson

Swing Gang

Bob Draney

Other

Julie Starr Dresner

Costume Supervisor

Pamela Eilerson

Assistant Director

Lynn Ezelle

Accounting Assistant

Jane Feinberg

Casting

John Feinblatt

Transportation Coordinator

Mike Fenton

Casting

Jimmy Forrest

Song

Bob Gale

Screenplay

Bob Gale

Producer

Tom Garris

Transportation Captain

Tom Garris

Other

Hal Gausman

Set Decorator

Albert N Gaynor

Graphic Artist

Albert N Gaynor

Scenic Artist

Anthony Gibson

Production Associate

Jack Grossberg

Unit Production Manager

Todd Hallowell

Art Director

Janice Hampton

Sound Editor

Kirk D. Hansen

Other

Nancy Hansen

Continuity

Paul Hanson

Advisor

Chris Hayes

Song

Diana Hayes

Production Associate

Gaynell Hodge

Song

Sean Hopper

Song

Bones Howe

Music Supervisor

Joseph E Hubbard

Set Designer

Steven Hughes

Costumes

Nita-lynne Hurley

Production Assistant

Philip C Hurst

Other

Robert J Iannaccone

Costume Supervisor

Roger Jaep

Apprentice

Etta James

Song Performer

Etta James

Song

John James

Other

Loren Janes

Stunts

Brad Jeffries

Choreographer

H Peter Johnson

Other

Dennis E Jones

Production Manager

William B. Kaplan

Sound Mixer

Kenneth Karman

Music Editor

Harry E Kaven

Other

Kathleen Kennedy

Executive Producer

Harry Keramidas

Editor

Max Kleven

Stunts

William Klinger

Special Effects

George Lafountaine

Other

Dick Lasley

Visual Effects

Dick Lasley

Production

Huey Lewis

Song

Peter Lonsdale

Props

Frank Marshall

Executive Producer

Thomas William Marshall

Best Boy

Steve Mathis

Other

David Mcgiffert

Assistant Director

Margie Stone Mcshirley

Set Designer

Joel Misetich

Other

Leanne Moore

Accountant

Julie Moskowitz

Assistant

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Ralph Nelson

Photography

Alan Nineberg

Adr Editor

Gail Oliver

Assistant

Michael Orefice

Best Boy

Maureen Osborne-beall

Production Coordinator

Johnny Otis

Song

Ramon Pahoyo

Craft Service

Fess Parker

Song Performer

James J. Passanante

Other

Lawrence G Paull

Production Designer

Paul Pav

Location Manager

Mark Pearson

Grip

Joe Pfaltzgraf

Props

Kevin Pike

Special Effects Supervisor

Kimberley Pike

Special Effects

Bernie Pock

Stunts

Andrew Probert

Production

Bonne Radford

Production Associate

Katy Radford

Assistant

Spiro Razatos

Stunts

Arthur Repola

Post-Production Supervisor

Bruce Richardson

Sound Editor

Connie Rinaldo

Dga Trainee

John Roesch

Foley

Michael S. Rutgard

Swing Gang

Robert Rutledge

Sound Editor

Mike Salts

Grip

Earl Sampson

Boom Operator

Susanna Sandke

Costumes

Dennis Sands

Sound

Nina Saxon

Titles

Robert Schmelzer

Stunts

Arthur P Schmidt

Editor

Gene Schwartz

Transportation Manager

Deborah Scott

Costume Designer

John-clay Scott

Stunts

Walter Scott

Stunt Coordinator

Tenny Sebastian Ii

Sound

Alan Silvestri

Music

Lewis C Simkins

Song

Larry Singer

Adr Editor

Neil Smith

Special Effects Foreman

Steven Spielberg

Executive Producer

Jerry R Stanford

Sound Editor

Raymond Stella

Camera Operator

Rob Stevens

Production Assistant

Steve Suits

Special Effects

Steven Talmy

Production Associate

Steve Tate

Assistant Camera Operator

Judy Taylor

Casting

The Four Aces

Song Performer

Robert Thirlwell

Sound

Judy Thomason

Assistant

Bill Varney

Sound

Darcy Vebber

Sound

Darcy Vebber

Other

Mark Walthour

Gaffer

Oscar Washington

Song

Robert Weatherwax

Animal Trainer

Per Welinder

Stunts

Roberta Wells

Other

Robert Widen

Props

Dootsi Williams

Song

David Wischnack

Special Effects Foreman

Ron Woodward

Key Grip

Bob Yerkes

Stunts

John Zemansky

Property Master

Robert Zemeckis

Screenplay

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Film Details

Also Known As
Regreso al futuro, Retour vers le futur, Tillbaka till framtiden
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Period
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m

Award Wins

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1985

Award Nominations

Best Original Screenplay

1985

Best Song

1985

Best Sound

1985

Articles

Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)


Wendie Jo Sperber, the zany comic actress who had appeared on several movies and sitcoms since the late '70s, died on November 29 of breast cancer at her Sherman Oaks home. She was 47.

Born on September 18, 1958 in Hollywood, California, Sperber made an impression from the beginning when, at just 19 years of age, she was cast as Rosie Petrofsky, the hyperactive, dreamy-eyed Beatle fan who will stop at nothing to see them on their Ed Sullivan debut in the charming Robert Zemeckis' period comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978). The film was a surprise smash in the Spring of '78, and she proved that her comic chops were no fluke when Stephen Spielberg cast her as a lovestruck teenager in his overblown spectacle 1941 (1979); and as a naive car buyer in Zemeckis' funny Kurt Russell outing Used Cars (1980).

As hilarious as she was in those films, Sperber earned her pop culture stripes when she played Amy Cassidy in the cult comedy series Bosom Buddies (1980-82). This strange sitcom, about two pals (Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari), who dressed in drag so they could live in an all-girls residential hotel might have had a flimsy premise - but the actors played it to the hilt. Hanks and Scolari were fine, but Sperber stole the series with her incredible physical display of pratfalls, comic sprints, splits and facial mugging. Indeed, here was one comedic performer who was not afraid to go all out for a laugh. Even after the cancellation of the show, Sperber continued to work in comedies throughout the decade: Bachelor Party (1984), Moving Violations, and in Back to the Future (both 1985).

Tragically, Sperber's career was halted in 1997 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. After a brief remission, she played a cancer survivor in a final season episode of Murphy Brown (1997-98). The warm reception she received from her appearance influenced her decision to become an active campaigner for cancer awareness and fundraising. The culmination of her humanitarian efforts resulted in 2001, when she founded weSPARK Cancer Support Center in Sherman Oaks, a nonprofit center that provides free emotional support, research information and social activities for cancer victims and their families. Despite her altruistic causes, Sperber still found time in recent years to make guest appearances on such hit television shows like Will & Grace and 8 Simple Rules...for Dating My Teenage Daughter. She is survived by a son, Preston; a daughter, Pearl; parents, Charlene and Burt; sisters, Ellice and Michelle; and a brother, Richard.

by Michael T. Toole
Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)

Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)

Wendie Jo Sperber, the zany comic actress who had appeared on several movies and sitcoms since the late '70s, died on November 29 of breast cancer at her Sherman Oaks home. She was 47. Born on September 18, 1958 in Hollywood, California, Sperber made an impression from the beginning when, at just 19 years of age, she was cast as Rosie Petrofsky, the hyperactive, dreamy-eyed Beatle fan who will stop at nothing to see them on their Ed Sullivan debut in the charming Robert Zemeckis' period comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978). The film was a surprise smash in the Spring of '78, and she proved that her comic chops were no fluke when Stephen Spielberg cast her as a lovestruck teenager in his overblown spectacle 1941 (1979); and as a naive car buyer in Zemeckis' funny Kurt Russell outing Used Cars (1980). As hilarious as she was in those films, Sperber earned her pop culture stripes when she played Amy Cassidy in the cult comedy series Bosom Buddies (1980-82). This strange sitcom, about two pals (Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari), who dressed in drag so they could live in an all-girls residential hotel might have had a flimsy premise - but the actors played it to the hilt. Hanks and Scolari were fine, but Sperber stole the series with her incredible physical display of pratfalls, comic sprints, splits and facial mugging. Indeed, here was one comedic performer who was not afraid to go all out for a laugh. Even after the cancellation of the show, Sperber continued to work in comedies throughout the decade: Bachelor Party (1984), Moving Violations, and in Back to the Future (both 1985). Tragically, Sperber's career was halted in 1997 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. After a brief remission, she played a cancer survivor in a final season episode of Murphy Brown (1997-98). The warm reception she received from her appearance influenced her decision to become an active campaigner for cancer awareness and fundraising. The culmination of her humanitarian efforts resulted in 2001, when she founded weSPARK Cancer Support Center in Sherman Oaks, a nonprofit center that provides free emotional support, research information and social activities for cancer victims and their families. Despite her altruistic causes, Sperber still found time in recent years to make guest appearances on such hit television shows like Will & Grace and 8 Simple Rules...for Dating My Teenage Daughter. She is survived by a son, Preston; a daughter, Pearl; parents, Charlene and Burt; sisters, Ellice and Michelle; and a brother, Richard. by Michael T. Toole

Back to the Future


In Back to the Future (1985), Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) is the human guinea pig who volunteers to travel back to his hometown in 1955 via a time-tripping DeLorean automobile. Once there, he discovers he is trapped and can't return to the present without an ample supply of plutonium. Not only that but he gets caught up in the soap opera lives of his own teenaged parents. He tries to get his milquetoast father (Crispin Glover) to stand up to the local bully with little success. More problematic is his future mother (Lea Thompson) who falls madly in love with him and calls him "dreamboat." Yes, the kid has got problems and if he doesn't straighten them out, he might be tampering with his own future existence.

The number one box office hit of 1985, Back to the Future is probably the only Oedipal comedy from a major Hollywood studio. It was co-written and directed by Robert Zemeckis, produced by Steven Spielberg, and yielded a top ten single - "The Power of Love" performed by Huey Lewis and the News - which dominated radio station play lists during August of 1985.

What most people DON'T KNOW about this blockbuster is that Michael J. Fox was not the first choice to play Marty McFly. Eric Stoltz was the original lead but five weeks into the shooting he was fired by Spielberg who was not happy with his performance. At the time of filming, the television series, Family Ties was a huge hit and Spielberg knew the reason for the show's appeal - Michael J. Fox. He was convinced that Fox could carry off the role of Marty McFly and his hunch proved correct. Unfortunately, Spielberg's new lead had a less than ideal work schedule. For six weeks straight, he would report for work early each day on the Paramount Family Ties set, then jump in his jeep and rush over to the Universal Back to the Future set where shooting would began at 6 p.m. and usually finish at midnight. You wouldn't know Fox was on the verge of physical collapse from watching Back to the Future, though. If anything, you might wonder where he got his boundless energy. Drugs? Hypnosis? Is he a digitally created special effect?

In addition to Fox's star-making performance in Back to the Future, the film's success also gave a tremendous boost to the screen careers of Christopher Lloyd (as the eccentric Dr. Emmett Brown) and the eccentric Crispin Glover (as George McFly). Lloyd's mad scientist routine provides some of the biggest laughs in the film and was quite a departure from his portrayal of "Reverend Jim" on Taxi, the beloved television series that really launched his career.

Part of the immense appeal of Back to the Future is the way it pokes fun at fifties culture as well as pop trends of the eighties. Like the scene where Michael J. Fox tries to order a Tab at the soda shop. Or the scene where Fox tells his high school companions that Ronald Reagan will become President of the United States one day. Of course, Fox also does his best to introduce some new music into the past, resulting in one show-stopping sequence - his invention of rock and roll (with apologies to Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly) at the high school prom.

During the Oscar campaign of 1985, Back to the Future won nominations for Best Original Screenplay, Best Sound, Best Song, and Best Sound Effects Editing (the only Academy Award it won). Nevertheless, the success of Back to the Future paved the way for two more sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990).

Producer: Neil Canton, Bob Gale
Director: Robert Zemeckis
Screenplay: Robert Zemeckis, Bob Gale
Art Direction: Todd Hallowell
Cinematography: Dean Cundey
Editing: Harry Keramidas, Arthur Schmidt
Music: Chris Hayes, Alan Silvestri
Cast: Michael J. Fox (Marty McFly), Christopher Lloyd (Dr. Emmett L. Brown), Lea Thompson (Lorraine Baines-McFly), Crispin Glover (George McFly), Thomas F. Wilson (Biff Tannen), Claudia Wells (Jennifer Parker), Marc McClure (Dave McFly), Wendie Jo Sperber (Linda McFly), George DiCenzo (Sam Baines), Frances Lee McCain (Stella Baines), Casey Siemaszko (3-D), Billy Zane (Match).
C-117m. Letterboxed.

By Jeff Stafford

Back to the Future

In Back to the Future (1985), Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) is the human guinea pig who volunteers to travel back to his hometown in 1955 via a time-tripping DeLorean automobile. Once there, he discovers he is trapped and can't return to the present without an ample supply of plutonium. Not only that but he gets caught up in the soap opera lives of his own teenaged parents. He tries to get his milquetoast father (Crispin Glover) to stand up to the local bully with little success. More problematic is his future mother (Lea Thompson) who falls madly in love with him and calls him "dreamboat." Yes, the kid has got problems and if he doesn't straighten them out, he might be tampering with his own future existence. The number one box office hit of 1985, Back to the Future is probably the only Oedipal comedy from a major Hollywood studio. It was co-written and directed by Robert Zemeckis, produced by Steven Spielberg, and yielded a top ten single - "The Power of Love" performed by Huey Lewis and the News - which dominated radio station play lists during August of 1985. What most people DON'T KNOW about this blockbuster is that Michael J. Fox was not the first choice to play Marty McFly. Eric Stoltz was the original lead but five weeks into the shooting he was fired by Spielberg who was not happy with his performance. At the time of filming, the television series, Family Ties was a huge hit and Spielberg knew the reason for the show's appeal - Michael J. Fox. He was convinced that Fox could carry off the role of Marty McFly and his hunch proved correct. Unfortunately, Spielberg's new lead had a less than ideal work schedule. For six weeks straight, he would report for work early each day on the Paramount Family Ties set, then jump in his jeep and rush over to the Universal Back to the Future set where shooting would began at 6 p.m. and usually finish at midnight. You wouldn't know Fox was on the verge of physical collapse from watching Back to the Future, though. If anything, you might wonder where he got his boundless energy. Drugs? Hypnosis? Is he a digitally created special effect? In addition to Fox's star-making performance in Back to the Future, the film's success also gave a tremendous boost to the screen careers of Christopher Lloyd (as the eccentric Dr. Emmett Brown) and the eccentric Crispin Glover (as George McFly). Lloyd's mad scientist routine provides some of the biggest laughs in the film and was quite a departure from his portrayal of "Reverend Jim" on Taxi, the beloved television series that really launched his career. Part of the immense appeal of Back to the Future is the way it pokes fun at fifties culture as well as pop trends of the eighties. Like the scene where Michael J. Fox tries to order a Tab at the soda shop. Or the scene where Fox tells his high school companions that Ronald Reagan will become President of the United States one day. Of course, Fox also does his best to introduce some new music into the past, resulting in one show-stopping sequence - his invention of rock and roll (with apologies to Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly) at the high school prom. During the Oscar campaign of 1985, Back to the Future won nominations for Best Original Screenplay, Best Sound, Best Song, and Best Sound Effects Editing (the only Academy Award it won). Nevertheless, the success of Back to the Future paved the way for two more sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990). Producer: Neil Canton, Bob Gale Director: Robert Zemeckis Screenplay: Robert Zemeckis, Bob Gale Art Direction: Todd Hallowell Cinematography: Dean Cundey Editing: Harry Keramidas, Arthur Schmidt Music: Chris Hayes, Alan Silvestri Cast: Michael J. Fox (Marty McFly), Christopher Lloyd (Dr. Emmett L. Brown), Lea Thompson (Lorraine Baines-McFly), Crispin Glover (George McFly), Thomas F. Wilson (Biff Tannen), Claudia Wells (Jennifer Parker), Marc McClure (Dave McFly), Wendie Jo Sperber (Linda McFly), George DiCenzo (Sam Baines), Frances Lee McCain (Stella Baines), Casey Siemaszko (3-D), Billy Zane (Match). C-117m. Letterboxed. By Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 1986

Began shooting November 26, 1984.

Released in USA on laserdisc (letterbox version) February 7, 1991.

Released in USA on laserdisc December 1988.

Released in United States Summer July 3, 1985

Released in United States on Video May 1986

Released in United States Summer July 3, 1985