Sex and the Single Girl


1h 54m 1964
Sex and the Single Girl

Brief Synopsis

A journalist sets out to expose a female sex expert but falls for her instead.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 1964
Premiere Information
New York opening: 25 Dec 1964
Production Company
Reynard Productions
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Inspired by the book Sex and the Single Girl by Helen Gurley Brown (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Synopsis

Bob Weston, managing editor of scandal magazine Dirt , writes a sensational and highly successful article on research psychologist Helen Gurley Brown, whose recently published book, Sex and the Single Girl , has become a national bestseller. Bob is assigned to interview Dr. Brown, but she refuses to see him. In order to meet her, Bob impersonates one of his neighbors, Frank Broderick, and goes to Helen for marriage counsel. After several meetings, during which Bob suggests to Helen that they commence an affair, he telephones her and threatens to drown himself unless she capitulates. She rushes to him and accidentally causes them to tumble into a boat basin. They go to Helen's apartment to dry out; Bob mixes a potent batch of martinis and attempts to seduce her. Helen confesses her love for Bob, and he replies that all is well; he is not legally married. Helen doesn't believe him and asks to see Sylvia, his wife. The next day, Bob inadvertently sends both his secretary, Susan, and his former girl friend, Gretchen, to Helen to impersonate Sylvia and convince Helen of his claim. Helen summons the real Sylvia, and the three women all turn up for the appointment. Sylvia has Frank jailed for bigamy; Helen deduces Bob's ruse and decides to leave town with colleague Rudy DeMeyer; Bob is fired from Dirt when he refuses to slander the innocent doctor by his article. He follows Helen onto the San Diego Freeway where they encounter both Frank, who is trying to escape to Hawaii, and Sylvia, who is pursuing him in a cab. After a wild chase and a hectic mix-up at the airport, the couples all get sorted out: Frank and Sylvia become reconciled, Bob and Helen get together at last, and Rudy and Gretchen unexpectedly enplane for Hawaii.

Photo Collections

Sex and the Single Girl - Publicity Stills
Sex and the Single Girl - Publicity Stills

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 1964
Premiere Information
New York opening: 25 Dec 1964
Production Company
Reynard Productions
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Inspired by the book Sex and the Single Girl by Helen Gurley Brown (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Articles

Sex and the Single Girl


For years, Warner Bros. had owned a script called How To Make Love and Like It that somehow never made it into production. After the studio also purchased the rights to Helen Gurley Brown's best-selling sex guide Sex and the Single Girl, it was decided to dust off the old script and update it with topical references to the sexual revolution as documented by Brown. As it turned out, the studio's fee to Brown of $200,000 essentially covered just the title and the use of her name. After yet another rewrite by novelist Joseph Heller (Catch-22), Sex and the Single Girl became a film with Natalie Wood as a sexologist named Helen Gurley Brown and Tony Curtis as a scandal-sheet editor who schemes to seduce her and expose her as an inexperienced virgin Ð only to fall in love, of course.

Curtis and Wood may have been top-billed, but most critics agreed it was second leads Henry Fonda and Lauren Bacall who stole the show as Curtis' bickering neighbors. Fonda plays a pantyhose manufacturer who becomes entangled in Curtis' schemes, and Bacall is his shrewish, chinaware-throwing wife. Among other amusing things, the older couple is required to do the "twist" to the music of Count Basie during a dance-floor spat. "When these two get down to some good old-fashioned domestic brawling," wrote film historian Lawrence J. Quirk, "they practically jump off the screen into the audience like a couple of forces of nature." Critic Howard Thompson added that Bacall had "the wittiest lines and all but pierces the picture with her buzzsaw growl."

Although Warner Bros. acknowledged that Sex and the Single Girl was a "satire on a provocative subject" that was merely "suggested" by Brown's book, the public was sufficiently intrigued by the saucy title and subject matter to turn the film into the fifteenth top-grosser ($4 million) of its year.

Producer: William T. Orr
Director: Richard Quine
Screenplay: Joseph Heller, David R. Schwartz, Leslie H. Martinson (uncredited), Joseph Hoffman (story), suggested by book by Helen Gurley Brown
Production Design: Cary Odell
Cinematography: Charles Lang
Editing: David Wages
Original Music: Neal Hefti
Principal Cast: Tony Curtis (Bob Weston), Natalie Wood (Helen Gurley Brown), Henry Fonda (Frank Broderick), Lauren Bacall (Sylvia Broderick), Mel Ferrer (Bob Weston), Edward Everett Horton (The Chief), Fran Jeffries (Gretchen), Otto Kruger (Dr. Marshall H. Anderson).
C-115m. Letterboxed.

by Roger Fristoe
Sex And The Single Girl

Sex and the Single Girl

For years, Warner Bros. had owned a script called How To Make Love and Like It that somehow never made it into production. After the studio also purchased the rights to Helen Gurley Brown's best-selling sex guide Sex and the Single Girl, it was decided to dust off the old script and update it with topical references to the sexual revolution as documented by Brown. As it turned out, the studio's fee to Brown of $200,000 essentially covered just the title and the use of her name. After yet another rewrite by novelist Joseph Heller (Catch-22), Sex and the Single Girl became a film with Natalie Wood as a sexologist named Helen Gurley Brown and Tony Curtis as a scandal-sheet editor who schemes to seduce her and expose her as an inexperienced virgin Ð only to fall in love, of course. Curtis and Wood may have been top-billed, but most critics agreed it was second leads Henry Fonda and Lauren Bacall who stole the show as Curtis' bickering neighbors. Fonda plays a pantyhose manufacturer who becomes entangled in Curtis' schemes, and Bacall is his shrewish, chinaware-throwing wife. Among other amusing things, the older couple is required to do the "twist" to the music of Count Basie during a dance-floor spat. "When these two get down to some good old-fashioned domestic brawling," wrote film historian Lawrence J. Quirk, "they practically jump off the screen into the audience like a couple of forces of nature." Critic Howard Thompson added that Bacall had "the wittiest lines and all but pierces the picture with her buzzsaw growl." Although Warner Bros. acknowledged that Sex and the Single Girl was a "satire on a provocative subject" that was merely "suggested" by Brown's book, the public was sufficiently intrigued by the saucy title and subject matter to turn the film into the fifteenth top-grosser ($4 million) of its year. Producer: William T. Orr Director: Richard Quine Screenplay: Joseph Heller, David R. Schwartz, Leslie H. Martinson (uncredited), Joseph Hoffman (story), suggested by book by Helen Gurley Brown Production Design: Cary Odell Cinematography: Charles Lang Editing: David Wages Original Music: Neal Hefti Principal Cast: Tony Curtis (Bob Weston), Natalie Wood (Helen Gurley Brown), Henry Fonda (Frank Broderick), Lauren Bacall (Sylvia Broderick), Mel Ferrer (Bob Weston), Edward Everett Horton (The Chief), Fran Jeffries (Gretchen), Otto Kruger (Dr. Marshall H. Anderson). C-115m. Letterboxed. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Locations filmed in and around Los Angeles, including the San Diego Freeway and Malibu.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 6, 1992

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1964

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1964

Released in United States on Video May 6, 1992