Gang Busters


1h 18m 1955
Gang Busters

Brief Synopsis

Hardened criminal repeatedly breaks out of Oregon State Prison, eluding police for prolonged periods afterwards.

Film Details

Genre
Crime
Prison
Release Date
Mar 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Visual Drama, Inc.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Location
Oregon, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the radio series Gang Busters created by Phillips H. Lord (1935--1957).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

One afternoon, police detective Walsh helps an apparently handicapped man load luggage into his car, but when the man acts suspiciously, Walsh arrests him and discovers that he has a gun taped inside the sling on his arm. After the man has been arrested, numerous weapons are found in the car, which is discovered to be stolen, and although the man refuses to give his name, the police discover that he is John Omar Pinson. Pinson, who is listed as the FBI's "Public Enemy No. 4" because of his many robberies, is sentenced to life imprisonment at the Oregon State Penitentiary. The ruthless, arrogant Pinson becomes the leader of a band of inmates, which includes Louie Feth, Mike Denike and Slug Bennett, but cruelly rejects the pleas for friendship from young criminal Wayne Long, who believes that Pinson is a mastermind. After a few months, Pinson sews himself into a bag of flaxseed and escapes from the prison. He begins stealing automobiles, but one day, while he is again employing his sling ruse, patrolman Rondeau investigates his activities and Pinson shoots him to death. Walsh and his partner, Detective Fuller, are among the policemen who set up roadblocks to trap Pinson, but Pinson is able to elude them. When Pinson attempts to leave the state, however, Walsh catches him at a train station, and he is returned to the penitentiary. After several months of good behavior, Pinson is allowed to exercise in the prison yard, and there meets up with his cohorts. Pinson promises to take them with him during his next escape, and so the men arrange to work in the motor pool so that they can be together. Their attempt to distract the guards with a fire in the tool shed fails, however, and Pinson is sent to solitary confinement. Hoping to win the approval of his hero, Wayne slips Pinson a file in a loaf of bread. After three months of sawing the door bolt, Pinson escapes from his cell, then knocks out a guard and steals his uniform. Using the guard's keys, he releases Bennett but leaves the pleading Wayne behind. During their climb over the prison wall, Bennett is shot, and Pinson is forced to drag him along to Lovers' Lane, where they steal a car. They then break into a pharmacy, where Pinson uses his training as a chemist to treat Bennett. The police, alerted to the break-in, shoot at them, and Pinson is seriously wounded while he and Bennett run away. They manage to escape into the hills and cross the Columbia River, thereby confusing the pursuing bloodhounds, but Pinson grows increasingly weak. Pinson asks Bennett to steal a shovel from a nearby farmhouse, and when Bennett returns, he believes that Pinson is dead. After burying Pinson, Bennett is forced to go to a doctor because of a terrible pain in his jaw. The doctor tells him that he has cancer, and the distressed Bennett attempts to commit suicide but fails. Knowing that he is dying from the cancer, Bennett leads Walsh to the site where he buried Pinson, and the men are stunned to discover that the grave is empty. Meanwhile, in the prison, Louie and Mike believe that Pinson is dead, but Wayne insists that he is alive, and that he knows how to contact Pinson. Intrigued, Walsh sends Fuller on an undercover mission to the prison, where he poses as a new prisoner assigned to be Wayne's cellmate. Louie and Mike, who have long boasted about having two machine guns hidden on "the outside," finally relent and tell Wayne where they are located. Because Fuller was unable to obtain any information, Walsh arranges for Wayne to be paroled, after which Wayne goes to the boardinghouse where the guns are stashed and retrieves them. Believing that the way to draw Pinson's attention is to get his name in the news, Wayne steals a truck and murders the driver. Wayne then attempts to rob a bank but is wounded as he attempts to escape. In custody, Wayne explains his warped plan to impress Pinson, which prompts Walsh to leak a story to the newspapers that Pinson is alive and in contact with Wayne. Pinson, who is indeed alive and living quietly, is infuriated and decides to flee the country. Needing a new identity and passport, Pinson contacts Petey, a forger, but the canny Walsh has Petey's poolhall under surveillance, and Pinson is apprehended. In Walsh's office, Pinson relates how he woke up after Bennett had buried him and staggered off to freedom, certain that he was safe. Pinson is sent back to the penitentiary, and on the night that Wayne dies in the gas chamber, Pinson merely smiles and goes to sleep.

Film Details

Genre
Crime
Prison
Release Date
Mar 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Visual Drama, Inc.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Location
Oregon, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the radio series Gang Busters created by Phillips H. Lord (1935--1957).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Articles

Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangbusters - Public Enemy Double Feature on DVD


This "Public Enemy Double Feature" release by Something Weird Video highlights two films by director Bill Karn who has four films to his credit, all of which are crime-related. Ma Barker's Killer Brood (1960) takes no prisoners as it sensationalizes Kate Barker as being the ruthless mastermind, and mother, of four real-life criminals who made headlines in the 1930's. Gangbusters (1954) tackles a charismatic criminal with a penchant for breaking out of the prisons, and cribs some stylistic touches from radio broadcast serials that began in the mid-thirties with the likes of G-Men.

Ma Barker's Killer Broodstars Lurene Tuttle, who also played Eliza Chambers in Psycho. Both of these films were released the same year and both are shocking, but Tuttle takes center stage in Ma Barker's Killer Brood, and she plays it to the hilt with the intensity of a drill sergeant gone bad. She's a domineering woman who cows her husband into submission and slaps her children around if they get caught by authorities. She starts off her kids on a life of crime at an early age when she encourages them to steal money from the collection plate at church, and then orchestrates bigger jobs until, cut to several years in the future when she and her four grown kids have long since been run out of town, the stakes include murder and fraternizing with the likes of Baby Face Nelson, Machine Gun Kelly, and "Johnny" Dillinger. The Ma Barker herein doesn't think twice about running people over (repeatedly) with a car or going out in a blaze of gunfire, and the sight of an older woman doing these things veers giddily between exploitation fare and good camp fun. For the record (or Court TV's Crime Library record, at least): "An FBI internal memo summarizing the history of the Barker-Karpis gang up to early 1936, contains the statement, `Kate Barker was killed for resisting arrest." This should be amended to `killed while her son was resisting arrest." Harvey Bailey, a veteran bank robber that sometimes worked with the Barker-Karpis group, said of the issue, `the old woman couldn't even organize breakfast.¿ (Richard Kudis, Alvin Karpis: Pursuit of the Last Public Enemy.)

Gangbusters stars Myron Healey in the lead as John Pinson, a dapper and deadly thug who is as quick on the sweet talk as he is on the trigger. With his strong chin and calm eyes that always seem to glimmer with assurance, Healey is a convincing charmer. With over 300 appearances on tv and film, he's the kind of actor you'll's as a heavy in a western movie or a tv walk-on role from anything between The Lone Ranger to The Incredible Hulk. You can also spot Healey briefly in Ma Barker¿s Killer Brood as an uncredited Sioux Fall bank robber. In Gangbusters Healey plays a bank robber whose crimes, we find out, "would take a half-hour to recite." If this particular 75-minute outing by Karn doesn't feel like a feature film consider its precursors: "Gang Busters became a short-lived television series in 1952 on NBC that alternated with Jack Webb's Dragnet. Episodes from the series dealing with Oregon prison escapee and identified as Public Enemy Number Four John Omar Pinson were strung together to form a theatrical feature" (excerpt from Martin Grams, Jr, from The G-Men Take to the Air Waves).

Both Ma Barker's Killer Brood and Gangbusters are presented in crisp, remastered, b&w with a 1.33:1 aspect ratio. Also on the disk is a fun "Hideout" collection of "Crime Busting Trailers" for Jacktown, Miami Expose, Slaughter on 10TH Avenue, Portland Expose ("The shame of 'B' girls. The brutal violence of twisted men." "When law and order give way to vice and dice."), and Baby Face Nelson (starring Mickey Rooney). Topping off the whole package is a half-hour 1956 featurette called Gun Girls that is full of bad dubbing, stilted dialogue, clumsy editing, cat fights, and lots of salacious bra shots - but also quick to moralize the whole thing as "a grim reminder to some parents that this girl could be your daughter." Parents beware!

For more information about Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangsters, visit Image Entertainment. To order Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangsters, go to TCM Shopping.

by Pablo Kjolseth
Ma Barker's Killer Brood/gangbusters - Public Enemy Double Feature On Dvd

Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangbusters - Public Enemy Double Feature on DVD

This "Public Enemy Double Feature" release by Something Weird Video highlights two films by director Bill Karn who has four films to his credit, all of which are crime-related. Ma Barker's Killer Brood (1960) takes no prisoners as it sensationalizes Kate Barker as being the ruthless mastermind, and mother, of four real-life criminals who made headlines in the 1930's. Gangbusters (1954) tackles a charismatic criminal with a penchant for breaking out of the prisons, and cribs some stylistic touches from radio broadcast serials that began in the mid-thirties with the likes of G-Men. Ma Barker's Killer Broodstars Lurene Tuttle, who also played Eliza Chambers in Psycho. Both of these films were released the same year and both are shocking, but Tuttle takes center stage in Ma Barker's Killer Brood, and she plays it to the hilt with the intensity of a drill sergeant gone bad. She's a domineering woman who cows her husband into submission and slaps her children around if they get caught by authorities. She starts off her kids on a life of crime at an early age when she encourages them to steal money from the collection plate at church, and then orchestrates bigger jobs until, cut to several years in the future when she and her four grown kids have long since been run out of town, the stakes include murder and fraternizing with the likes of Baby Face Nelson, Machine Gun Kelly, and "Johnny" Dillinger. The Ma Barker herein doesn't think twice about running people over (repeatedly) with a car or going out in a blaze of gunfire, and the sight of an older woman doing these things veers giddily between exploitation fare and good camp fun. For the record (or Court TV's Crime Library record, at least): "An FBI internal memo summarizing the history of the Barker-Karpis gang up to early 1936, contains the statement, `Kate Barker was killed for resisting arrest." This should be amended to `killed while her son was resisting arrest." Harvey Bailey, a veteran bank robber that sometimes worked with the Barker-Karpis group, said of the issue, `the old woman couldn't even organize breakfast.¿ (Richard Kudis, Alvin Karpis: Pursuit of the Last Public Enemy.) Gangbusters stars Myron Healey in the lead as John Pinson, a dapper and deadly thug who is as quick on the sweet talk as he is on the trigger. With his strong chin and calm eyes that always seem to glimmer with assurance, Healey is a convincing charmer. With over 300 appearances on tv and film, he's the kind of actor you'll's as a heavy in a western movie or a tv walk-on role from anything between The Lone Ranger to The Incredible Hulk. You can also spot Healey briefly in Ma Barker¿s Killer Brood as an uncredited Sioux Fall bank robber. In Gangbusters Healey plays a bank robber whose crimes, we find out, "would take a half-hour to recite." If this particular 75-minute outing by Karn doesn't feel like a feature film consider its precursors: "Gang Busters became a short-lived television series in 1952 on NBC that alternated with Jack Webb's Dragnet. Episodes from the series dealing with Oregon prison escapee and identified as Public Enemy Number Four John Omar Pinson were strung together to form a theatrical feature" (excerpt from Martin Grams, Jr, from The G-Men Take to the Air Waves). Both Ma Barker's Killer Brood and Gangbusters are presented in crisp, remastered, b&w with a 1.33:1 aspect ratio. Also on the disk is a fun "Hideout" collection of "Crime Busting Trailers" for Jacktown, Miami Expose, Slaughter on 10TH Avenue, Portland Expose ("The shame of 'B' girls. The brutal violence of twisted men." "When law and order give way to vice and dice."), and Baby Face Nelson (starring Mickey Rooney). Topping off the whole package is a half-hour 1956 featurette called Gun Girls that is full of bad dubbing, stilted dialogue, clumsy editing, cat fights, and lots of salacious bra shots - but also quick to moralize the whole thing as "a grim reminder to some parents that this girl could be your daughter." Parents beware! For more information about Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangsters, visit Image Entertainment. To order Ma Barker's Killer Brood/Gangsters, go to TCM Shopping. by Pablo Kjolseth

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's opening title card reads: "Visual Drama, Inc. in association with Terry Turner presents Gang Busters." The rest of the film's onscreen credits appear at the conclusion of the picture. Although the credits indicate that Visual Drama, Inc. copyrighted the picture in 1955, the film is not included in the Copyright Catalog. The film opens with voice-over narration (by Gabriel Heatter) describing the deplorable prison conditions that have often led to jailbreaks and riots, but claims that "through the successful efforts of Governor Paul Patterson and Warden Clarence Gladden, citizens of Oregon no longer live in fear of escapes." The narration continues that Gang Busters brings the audience the story of John Omar Pinson in the hope that "the focus of our nation will be brought on penal institutions." Don Harvey, as "Detective Walsh," is then shown sitting at his desk and introduces himself as the host of the Gang Busters case. The film is presented in a semi-documentary format, with voice-over narration by Harvey heard intermittently throughout. A written statement at the end of the credits reads: "Occasionally names and places are changed to protect the innocent."
       The film is loosely based on the crimes of Omar August Pinson, also known as John Omar Pinson. Although the film states that he was the FBI's "Public Enemy No. 4," the FBI has never had a "Public Enemy" list. Pinson was number five on the bureau's first "ten most wanted" list, however. In 1936, Pinson was first arrested and jailed, and after serving several more prison terms, continued to commit burglaries. On April 15, 1947, Pinson murdered Oregon State Police Officer Delmond Rondeau and was sentenced to life imprisonment in the state penitentiary. On May 30, 1949, Pinson escaped from the prison, and, as depicted in the film, was buried alive by his fellow escapee, who believed that he had died from gunshot wounds. Pinson was re-captured in August 1950 and returned to the Oregon State Penitentiary, from which he was paroled in 1959. Pinson was also the subject of a show on the radio series Wanted. Airing in 1950 on the NBC network, "The Cop Killer of the West" gave a description of Pinson, who was still at large at the time of the broadcast, and was directed by Walter McGraw.
       Production of a feature-length film of Gang Busters was announced in November 1954. The film was based on Phillips H. Lord's long-running radio series of the same name. The radio series, featuring narrators such as Lord and H. Norman Schwarzkopf, the superintendent of the New Jersey State Police during the investigation of the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby, ran from 1935 to 1957 on various networks. It was first known as G-Men and changed its name to Gang Busters shortly after its debut. The radio show spawned a popular but short-lived television series, called Gangbusters, which ran on the NBC network in 1952 and featured Lord as the narrator. The series presented purportedly "authentic police case histories" "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the United States." The radio show was credited with aiding in the capture of several hundred criminals through the airing of their descriptions.
       A thirteen-chapter movie serial, entitled Gang Busters, was released by Universal in 1942. The serial was directed by Ray Taylor and Noel Smith and starred Kent Taylor. According to the Variety review, portions of the 1955 picture were shot on location in Oregon. The review also reported that the film, the first produced by General Teleradio, had already "had some striking successes in New England," where it was being distributed on a states-rights basis with support from television advertisments that "were heavy on the lurid violence aspect." In a negative review of the picture, the Los Angeles Examiner critic speculated that "this supposedly new movie has been enlarged to feature length from a shorter TV production." Although Visual Drama, Inc., a subsidiary of General Teleradio, was listed in Hollywood Reporter's television production charts as producing a number of half-hour episodes of Gang Busters, only the feature film was released.