Honeymoon


1h 14m 1947
Honeymoon

Brief Synopsis

A teen bride eloping to Mexico suddenly falls for an older man.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Release Date
May 17, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,632ft

Synopsis

Midwestern teenager Barbara Ohmstead arrives in Mexico City and is disappointed when Corporal Phil Vaughn, who is flying in from Panama to marry her, fails to appear at the train station. At the American consulate, Barbara learns from David Flanner, the overworked vice consul, that Phil's flight has been delayed until tomorrow. Moments after Barbara leaves David's office to find a hotel, however, Phil shows up, having caught a last-minute military flight. Phil, who tells David that he fell in love with Barbara when she accidentally dove on top of him in a swimming pool, determines to find and marry her before his two-day pass expires.

Barbara, meanwhile, has no luck securing accommodations and seeks help from David, who is attending his fiancée Rachel Mendoza's harp recital. Before David can say no, an exhausted Barbara faints from hunger. Feeling sorry for the teenager, David takes her to a nice restaurant and is seen dancing the jitterbug with her by Rachel's conservative father, Don Gaspar. Embarrassed, David rushes Barbara to his hotel, but because no rooms are available, she decides to go to Xochimilco, where she and Phil were supposed to spend their wedding night.

Concerned for Barbara's safety, David accompanies her there, and the two enjoy a romantic boat ride together. When David suddenly remembers he has a dinner date with Rachel, however, he falls into the water and must replace his soaking wet suit with traditional Mexican attire. David then hides to avoid being spotted by a friend of Rachel's, and Barbara, unaware of the friend, angrily runs off. David chases after her and is slugged by Phil, who has just arrived and mistakes him for a masher. After they spend the night with David in his hotel room, the would-be newlyweds rush to the courthouse, but are told they need a health certificate to marry and will have to wait to get one as all of the doctors in Mexico City are attending a conference. Undaunted, Barbara and Phil go to the conference and try to explain their predicament to a doctor, but as he speaks only Spanish, he has no idea what they are requesting.

When Barbara's subsequent insult is misintrepreted as a compliment, however, the flattered doctor signs their certificate. Armed with the certificate, Barbara and Phil return to the courthouse, but are informed by an enterprising Mexican that they need four witnesses. After paying for their witnesses, the couple finds a willing judge, but he tells Barbara, who falsified her age on her tourist card, that she is too young to marry without parental consent. At their wit's end, the couple goes to Rachel's family estate, where David is entertaining visiting American politicians. David, whose romance with Rachel is suffering because of Barbara's persistence, promises to help the couple marry outside the country and sends them on their way. The impetuous Barbara, however, argues with Phil and returns to David's garden party. Although David tries to convince Barbara to rejoin Phil, who is hiding in a tree, she refuses to listen and goes for a swim in the Mendozas' pool.

When she accidentally dives on top of a passing David, she is momentarily knocked out and awakens madly in love with the diplomat. Now desperate, David finds Phil and sends him to Barbara's room. Barbara, however, is still in love with David and breaks her engagement with Phil. After a heartbroken Phil informs David of his "victory," David threatens to spank Barbara, who screams and brings Phil running. Phil slugs David and throws Barbara into the pool, then dives on top of her. Smitten once again, Barbara finally walks down the aisle with Phil, while David and a forgiving Rachel reunite.

Cast

Shirley Temple

Barbara [Ohmstead]

Franchot Tone

[David] Flanner

Guy Madison

[Corporal] Phil [Vaughn]

Lina Romay

Raquel [Mendoza]

Gene Lockhart

Prescott

Corinna Mura

Senora Mendoza

Grant Mitchell

Crenshaw

Julio Villarreal

Senor [Gaspar] Mendoza

Manuel Arvide

Registrar

José R. Goula

Doctor Diego

Trude Marson

Miss Lippincott

Carol Forman

Nurse

Alma Beltran

Nurse

Paul Fierro

Clerk at civil registry

Charles Trowbridge

Judge Riberol

Lucio Villegas

Chairman of meeting

Gabriel Peralta

Doctor

Ted Kelly

Attendant

Martín Garralaga

Attendant

Tony Roux

Mexican witness

Eumenio Blanco

Mexican witness

Roque Ybarra

Mexican witness

Israel García

Bailiff

Ben Ortiz

Court clerk

Alex Montoya

First lawyer

Paul Ravel

Second lawyer

Rodolfo Hoyos Jr.

Flanner's friend

Robert Tafur

Flanner's friend

Blanca Vischer

Flanner's friend

Anita Camargo

Flanner's friend

Elena Durán

Flanner's friend

Robert Manning

Greeter

Leo Cleary

Barnes

John Parrish

Gilhooley

Manuel Paris

Maitre d'hotel

Felipe Turich

Waiter

Joaquín Elizondo

Captain of waiters

Forbes Murray

American ambassador

Harry Denny

American diplomat

Franklin Farnum

American diplomat

Fred Godoy

Mexican diplomat

Ralph Navarro Norwood

Mexican diplomat

Ramon Numoz

Mexican diplomat

Trini Varela

Señora Diaz

Rodolfo Hoyos Sr.

Storekeeper of serape shop

Vi Ingraham

Flower girl

Mario Santos

Singer

Kay Christopher

Bride

Robert Bray

Bridegroom

Alfredo Palacios

Desk clerk

Lita Cortez

Woman at desk

Dolores Castelli

Servant girl

Julia Montoya

Seamstress

Frances Domínguez

Seamstress

Joe Dominguez

Gardner

Robert E. O'connor

Gardner

Eduardo Noriega

Dancer

Ernesto Monato

Policeman

George Treviño

Taxi driver

Mike Rodríguez

Taxi driver

Augie Gómez

Taxi driver

Alfredo Berumen

Witness

Ernesto Zambrano

Witness

Charles O'curran

Bandleader

Salvador Báguez

Boatman

Herbert Rawlinson

American

Lupe González

Indian woman

Lucille Charles

Girl

Jose Portugal

Boy

Estralita Zarco

George Mendoza

Mary Worth

Paulita Arviza

Rosa Dorca

Vida Aldana

George Brenner

Fred Cordova

Josephine Parra

Alphonse Du Bois

Wilbur Mack

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Release Date
May 17, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,632ft

Articles

Honeymoon (1947)


By the mid-1940s, Shirley Temple was no longer the adorable moppet who had filled 20th Century Fox's coffers throughout the 1930s. Under contract to David O. Selznick, she had transitioned gracefully into teenage roles in films such as Since You Went Away (1944) and I'll Be Seeing You (1944). But soon, Temple's personal life began consuming most of her attention. In 1945, at age 17, she graduated from high school, got engaged to soldier John Agar, and planned to enroll at UCLA. Instead, she got married that September. In the spring of 1946, she began production on her next film, on loanout to RKO. The studio capitalized on her newlywed status and titled it Honeymoon (1947).

Temple plays teenage bride Barbara who's eloped to Mexico City to meet her fiancé Phil (Guy Madison) and get married. Missed connections put the couple into the path of harried American consul David Flanner (Franchot Tone), and the complications increase when Temple imagines herself in love with Flanner.

In her 1988 autobiography, Child Star, Temple recalls that she sat under a sunlamp just before production on Honeymoon got underway, and ended up with swollen eyes. For the first few days of filming, she had to be shot in wide shots only. She also writes that Joseph Cotten, also under contract to Selznick, went on suspension when he refused to be loaned to RKO to play the Tone role in Honeymoon, because he felt he was too old to be playing opposite Temple.

As a newlywed, Temple was under constant scrutiny by the press, which was waiting breathlessly for an announcement of pregnancy. During the filming of Honeymoon, Temple had her wisdom teeth removed and suffered an infection, which caused her jaw to swell. A doctor was called to the set to treat it, and Temple joked to her stand-in that "my jaw was pregnant." Someone overheard and misheard this comment, and the next day, gossip columnists announced her impending motherhood. In fact, her marriage was already in trouble, and the birth of a daughter in 1948 would not save it. The couple would divorce in 1949.

Critics suggested that Temple, now a grown-up married woman of 18, was perhaps too old to play cute, and that the script of Honeymoon made her annoying instead of adorable. Bosley Crowther of the New York Times wrote, "The friends of Shirley Temple must be getting a little bit tired of seeing this buxom young lady still acting as if she were still a kid. Shirley is no Greta Garbo, which is plain enough to see, but she certainly deserves an opportunity to act smarter than she does in Honeymoon." The Time critic admitted that "Honeymoon has its entertaining moments but something goes wrong with the farcical frenzy the leading players are supposed to whip up. The character Miss Temple plays is presented as if she were just too terribly cute, whereas she is playing a spoiled brat who has yet to learn that the world is not her oyster." Fans apparently agreed - the film lost $675,000. While it's not one of Temple's best performances during the latter part of her career, she does have her moments, especially when playing opposite expert farceur Tone. And she does get to sing, and to dance a sexy samba.

Director: William Keighley
Producer: Warren Duff
Screenplay: Michael Kanin, based on a story by Vicki Baum
Cinematography: Edward Cronjager
Editor: Ralph Dawson
Costume Design: Edward Stevenson
Art Direction: Ralph Berger, Albert S. D'Agostino
Music: Leigh Harline
Cast: Shirley Temple (Barbara), Franchot Tone (Flanner), Guy Madison (Phil), Lina Romay (Raquel), Gene Lockhart (Prescott), Corinna Mura (Senora Mendoza), Grant Mitchell (Crenshaw), Julio Villarreal (Senor Mendoza), Manuel Arvide (Registrar), Jose R. Goula (Dr. Diego).
BW-74m.

by Margarita Landazuri
Honeymoon (1947)

Honeymoon (1947)

By the mid-1940s, Shirley Temple was no longer the adorable moppet who had filled 20th Century Fox's coffers throughout the 1930s. Under contract to David O. Selznick, she had transitioned gracefully into teenage roles in films such as Since You Went Away (1944) and I'll Be Seeing You (1944). But soon, Temple's personal life began consuming most of her attention. In 1945, at age 17, she graduated from high school, got engaged to soldier John Agar, and planned to enroll at UCLA. Instead, she got married that September. In the spring of 1946, she began production on her next film, on loanout to RKO. The studio capitalized on her newlywed status and titled it Honeymoon (1947). Temple plays teenage bride Barbara who's eloped to Mexico City to meet her fiancé Phil (Guy Madison) and get married. Missed connections put the couple into the path of harried American consul David Flanner (Franchot Tone), and the complications increase when Temple imagines herself in love with Flanner. In her 1988 autobiography, Child Star, Temple recalls that she sat under a sunlamp just before production on Honeymoon got underway, and ended up with swollen eyes. For the first few days of filming, she had to be shot in wide shots only. She also writes that Joseph Cotten, also under contract to Selznick, went on suspension when he refused to be loaned to RKO to play the Tone role in Honeymoon, because he felt he was too old to be playing opposite Temple. As a newlywed, Temple was under constant scrutiny by the press, which was waiting breathlessly for an announcement of pregnancy. During the filming of Honeymoon, Temple had her wisdom teeth removed and suffered an infection, which caused her jaw to swell. A doctor was called to the set to treat it, and Temple joked to her stand-in that "my jaw was pregnant." Someone overheard and misheard this comment, and the next day, gossip columnists announced her impending motherhood. In fact, her marriage was already in trouble, and the birth of a daughter in 1948 would not save it. The couple would divorce in 1949. Critics suggested that Temple, now a grown-up married woman of 18, was perhaps too old to play cute, and that the script of Honeymoon made her annoying instead of adorable. Bosley Crowther of the New York Times wrote, "The friends of Shirley Temple must be getting a little bit tired of seeing this buxom young lady still acting as if she were still a kid. Shirley is no Greta Garbo, which is plain enough to see, but she certainly deserves an opportunity to act smarter than she does in Honeymoon." The Time critic admitted that "Honeymoon has its entertaining moments but something goes wrong with the farcical frenzy the leading players are supposed to whip up. The character Miss Temple plays is presented as if she were just too terribly cute, whereas she is playing a spoiled brat who has yet to learn that the world is not her oyster." Fans apparently agreed - the film lost $675,000. While it's not one of Temple's best performances during the latter part of her career, she does have her moments, especially when playing opposite expert farceur Tone. And she does get to sing, and to dance a sexy samba. Director: William Keighley Producer: Warren Duff Screenplay: Michael Kanin, based on a story by Vicki Baum Cinematography: Edward Cronjager Editor: Ralph Dawson Costume Design: Edward Stevenson Art Direction: Ralph Berger, Albert S. D'Agostino Music: Leigh Harline Cast: Shirley Temple (Barbara), Franchot Tone (Flanner), Guy Madison (Phil), Lina Romay (Raquel), Gene Lockhart (Prescott), Corinna Mura (Senora Mendoza), Grant Mitchell (Crenshaw), Julio Villarreal (Senor Mendoza), Manuel Arvide (Registrar), Jose R. Goula (Dr. Diego). BW-74m. by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

RKO borrowed Guy Madison and Shirley Temple from David O. Selznick's company for this production. Hollywood Reporter news items add the following information about the production: Joseph Cotten was first cast in the role of "David Flanner," but turned down the part because he felt he was too old to be linked romantically with Temple's character. As a result of his refusal, Cotten was put on suspension by Selznick. In onscreen credits Julian Villarreal's name is misspelled as "Villareal."
       In early March 1946, RKO announced that the film was to be shot in and around its new Churubusco studios near Mexico City. Because of a workers' strike in the Mexican film industry, however, the production remained in Hollywood until mid-April 1946. At that time, the cast and crew were scheduled to shoot for twenty-two days in and around the Mexican studio. Over two hundred Spanish-speaking extras were hired to appear in the film. Director William Keighley was to assist in the editing, and producer David Hempstead was borrowed from Selznick's company to supervise the editing. Alfonso Sánchez Tello is credited in Hollywood Reporter as "helping" the film's second unit in Mexico City, but the exact nature of his contribution is not known. Modern sources note that the picture cost $1,739,000 to produce and lost $675,000 at the box office.