Granny Get Your Gun


56m 1940
Granny Get Your Gun

Brief Synopsis

An elderly woman turns sheriff to clear her granddaughter of murder charges.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Release Date
Feb 10, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
56m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Synopsis

When Julie Westcott's abusive ex-husband Phil threatens to expose Julie's gambling addiction and sue her for custody of their daughter, Minerva Hatton, Julie's mother, helps out by calling her old friend, attorney Nate Paulson. Minerva, a sharpshooter who paid Phil $10,000 to divorce Julie, asks Nate to investigate gambling house owner Riff Daggett and find out who hooked Julie on gambling. After discovering that Julie wrote two rubber checks to Riff to cover her $8,000 gambling debt, and that Phil can file felony charges against her, Minerva sets out to strike a deal with Phil. At Phil's house, Minerva finds his recently murdered body with Julie's handkerchief lying beside him. Minerva tries to shield her daughter from murder charges and shoulders the guilt herself, but an inconsistency in her story on the witness stand leads to Julie's arrest. Determined to clear her daughter's name, Minerva begins an investigation of her own and discovers that Daggett is the owner of the small dog that came running out of Phil's house when she discovered his body. With this information, Minerva goes to Nate's, where Smokey, Nate's assistant, finds Daggett's picture in an old detective story magazine in the "Wanted" section of true crimes. After Minerva and Nate are sworn in as sheriffs pro tem , because the actual sheriff's department is away at a rodeo, the two go after Daggett. They soon locate Daggett, and when he reaches for his gun, Minerva beats him to the draw and shoots him. When the injured Daggett admits to killing Phil, the mystery is solved and Julie is set free.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Release Date
Feb 10, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
56m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Articles

Granny Get Your Gun -


Gray haired and sweet-faced May Robson may not have been the oldest actress in movies, but the Australian-born (and Oscar-nominated) actress was one of very few faces in Hollywood's Golden Era born before the Civil War. Here, the queen of a rough-and-tumble Nevada mining town comes to the defense of her granddaughter (Margot Stevenson) when she's sued for divorce on wrongful charges, only to get herself tangled up in a murder case. This comedy-western was, astoundingly, how Warner Brothers burned off their rights to the last Perry Mason novel in their possession, by re-writing the sleuth as a part for the diminutive (5'2") actress who, at the age of 82, was still spry enough to do her own car chases.

By Violet LeVoit
Granny Get Your Gun -

Granny Get Your Gun -

Gray haired and sweet-faced May Robson may not have been the oldest actress in movies, but the Australian-born (and Oscar-nominated) actress was one of very few faces in Hollywood's Golden Era born before the Civil War. Here, the queen of a rough-and-tumble Nevada mining town comes to the defense of her granddaughter (Margot Stevenson) when she's sued for divorce on wrongful charges, only to get herself tangled up in a murder case. This comedy-western was, astoundingly, how Warner Brothers burned off their rights to the last Perry Mason novel in their possession, by re-writing the sleuth as a part for the diminutive (5'2") actress who, at the age of 82, was still spry enough to do her own car chases. By Violet LeVoit

Quotes

Trivia

Publicity claimed May Robson did not use a double for the car chase.

Notes

An Los Angeles Examiner pre-production news item noted that Humphrey Bogart was originally set to play the role of "Riff Daggett," and that Jane Bryan was originally slated for the role of "Julie Westcott." August 1939 Hollywood Reporter news items indicate that Vincent Sherman was originally set to direct the film and that Lya Lys was cast in a featured part. Hollywood Reporter news items also note that production on the picture was postponed to allow May Robson to finish her role in Four Wives. According to studio publicity material, Robson did not use a double for the filming of the car chase scenes. The car, a vintage Ford, was reported to have been so heavily damaged during the chase scenes that it was junked at the end of production.