WarGames


1h 53m 1983

Brief Synopsis

In search of the ultimate game, a young man accidentally hacks into the government's top military computer.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
War
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1983
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA; Steilacoom, Washington, USA; Mount Vernon, Washington, USA; Newhalem, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 53m

Synopsis

A teenaged computer genius taps into NORAD's defense computers and almost starts World War III.

Crew

David Anderberg

Grip

Joy Anzarouth

Production Coordinator

Newton Arnold

Assistant Director

Mick Baran

Special Effects

Gregg H Bilson

Props

Gregg H Bilson

Property Master

Gerald H Boatright

Lighting Technician

Milton C Burrow

Sound Effects Editor

Willie Burton

Sound

Colin Cantwell

Consultant

Bill Cobb

Special Effects

Bob Cole

Special Effects Foreman

Jack Cooperman

Photography

Robert Decker

Location Manager

Barry Delaney

Costumes

Carlos Delarios

Sound

David Diano

Camera Assistant

Joe Digaetano

Special Effects

Gary Dodd

Key Grip

Rob Doherty

Assistant Director

Marcia Dripchak

Graphics

Robert Eggenweiler

Location Manager

Tom Elliott

Stunts

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects Supervisor

Linda Fleischer

Effects Coordinator

William Fraker

Director Of Photography

John Garber

Dialogue Coach

Michael Germain

Makeup

Leonard Goldberg

Executive Producer

Angelo Graham

Production Designer

Steve Grumette

Consultant

Lynda Gurasich

Hair

Bill Hansard

Camera Coordinator

Donald Hansard

Camera Coordinator

Marguerite Happy

Stunts

David Hardberger

Graphics

Richard Hashimoto

Associate Producer

Richard Hashimoto

Unit Production Manager

Judith Herman

Graphics

Mark Hoder

Original Music

Al Jones

Stunts

Richard Keefe

Other

Geoffrey Kirkland

Consultant

Bruce Knechtges

Special Effects

Michael J Kohut

Sound

Lawrence Lasker

Screenplay

Robin Leyden

Special Effects

Sylvia Lovegren

Graphics

William L Manger

Sound Effects Editor

Linda Matthews

Costumes

Harold Michelson

Continuity

Cynthia Morrow

Theme Lyrics

James J Murakami

Art Director

Randy Musselman

Driver

Ralph Nelson

Photography

Wallis Nicita

Casting

Pat Orseth

Casting

H. Bud Otto

Script Supervisor

Walter F. Parkes

Screenplay

Derry J Pearce

Production Auditor

Douglas Pentek

Lighting Technician

Liza Randol

Assistant Editor

Robin Reilly

Special Effects

Michael Ripps

Associate Editor

Aaron Rochin

Sound

Tom Rolf

Editor

Arthur B. Rubinstein

Music

Dana Satler

Assistant

Bob Scaife

Construction Coordinator

John Michael Schenk

Property Master Assistant

Harold Schneider

Producer

Jonathan Seay

Graphics

Mark Stivers

Special Effects

Ray Summers

Wardrobe Supervisor

Brenda Todd

Makeup

Joe Tuley

Music Editor

Richard Turne

Camera Assistant

Bill Watson

Consultant

Robert Wilcox

Special Effects

Duncan Wilmore

Technical Advisor

Jerry Wunderlich

Set Decorator

Steve Yaconelli

Camera Operator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
War
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1983
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA; Steilacoom, Washington, USA; Mount Vernon, Washington, USA; Newhalem, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 53m

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

1983

Best Original Screenplay

1983

Best Sound

1983

Articles

WarGames


Having been released only four years after the Oscar-nominated drama, The China Syndrome (1979), WarGames (1983) resounded the clarion call about the danger of nuclear Armageddon. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Screenplay (written directly for the screen by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parker), Best Cinematography (William A. Faker), and Best Sound (Michael J. Kohut). And WarGames was not the only "no nukes" movie contending for an Academy Award that year. That same year Jane Alexander was nominated for Best Actress for her heartbreaking performance in Testament, a drama about a family living with the aftermath of a nuclear holocaust. In the documentary short subject category, one of the nominees pondered the future with their entry, In the Nuclear Shadow: What Can the Children Tell Us? (1983).

The story line of WarGames follows a high school-age computer hacker (Matthew Broderick) as he accidentally taps into the giant computer brain for the U.S. Defense Department and mistakes it for a highly publicized new game that all the techno geeks are playing called "Global Thermonuclear Warfare." The film was Matthew Broderick's second screen role and was instrumental in launching his film career. Previously he had scored a personal success on the Broadway stage in Neil Simon's Brighton Beach Memoirs, for which he won a Tony Award.

Released in the era of the video arcade game (Pac-Man fever was at its height) and the beginning of the end to the Cold War, WarGames was a huge hit with critics and audiences alike, ranking at number four in the top ten box-office hits of the year. Younger viewers responded to the film's entertaining mix of suspense and technology while adults appreciated its sobering message. Michael Sragow of Rolling Stone wrote, "WarGames is an apocalyptic thriller with an anti-nuclear point and a story line so cleverly worked out that it should have audiences laughing and palpitating at the same time....More than any American feature since the early sixties, WarGames dramatizes the hazardous distance that exists between political and military leaders."

John Badham was brought in to replace director Martin Brest after twelve days of shooting of WarGames. Badham also directed and released Blue Thunder the same year; it was yet another film that questioned man's reliance on machines for protection. Badham reinforced this idea in an interview for American Film by Naomi Glauberman, saying WarGames "is about the ability of technology to take over our lives, so the tail is wagging the dog, us being the dog. And the tail is going to wag us right out the window. The China Syndrome is about that. The more powerful and the more authority we delegate to computers, the more things we are abdicating. And that's where it gets to be dangerous. Suddenly the roles are reversed and then, in a true Harold Pinter situation, we don't know who's the servant and who's the master."

Producer: Leonard Goldberg, Harold Schneider
Director: John Badham
Screenplay: William A. Fraker, Walon Green, Lawrence Lasker, Walter Parkes
Production Design: Angelo P. Graham, Richard Hashimoto
Cinematography: William A. Fraker
Costume Design: Barry Delaney, Linda Matthews
Film Editing: Michael Ripps, Tom Rolf
Original Music: Arthur B. Rubinstein
Principal Cast: Matthew Broderick (David Lightman), Dabney Coleman (John McKittrick), John Wood (Stephen Falken), Ally Sheedy (Jennifer Mack), Barry Corbin (General Beringer), Juanin Clay (Pat Healy), Kent Williams (Arthur Cabot), Dennis Lipscomb (Lyle Watson).
C-113m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Scott McGee
Wargames

WarGames

Having been released only four years after the Oscar-nominated drama, The China Syndrome (1979), WarGames (1983) resounded the clarion call about the danger of nuclear Armageddon. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Screenplay (written directly for the screen by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parker), Best Cinematography (William A. Faker), and Best Sound (Michael J. Kohut). And WarGames was not the only "no nukes" movie contending for an Academy Award that year. That same year Jane Alexander was nominated for Best Actress for her heartbreaking performance in Testament, a drama about a family living with the aftermath of a nuclear holocaust. In the documentary short subject category, one of the nominees pondered the future with their entry, In the Nuclear Shadow: What Can the Children Tell Us? (1983). The story line of WarGames follows a high school-age computer hacker (Matthew Broderick) as he accidentally taps into the giant computer brain for the U.S. Defense Department and mistakes it for a highly publicized new game that all the techno geeks are playing called "Global Thermonuclear Warfare." The film was Matthew Broderick's second screen role and was instrumental in launching his film career. Previously he had scored a personal success on the Broadway stage in Neil Simon's Brighton Beach Memoirs, for which he won a Tony Award. Released in the era of the video arcade game (Pac-Man fever was at its height) and the beginning of the end to the Cold War, WarGames was a huge hit with critics and audiences alike, ranking at number four in the top ten box-office hits of the year. Younger viewers responded to the film's entertaining mix of suspense and technology while adults appreciated its sobering message. Michael Sragow of Rolling Stone wrote, "WarGames is an apocalyptic thriller with an anti-nuclear point and a story line so cleverly worked out that it should have audiences laughing and palpitating at the same time....More than any American feature since the early sixties, WarGames dramatizes the hazardous distance that exists between political and military leaders." John Badham was brought in to replace director Martin Brest after twelve days of shooting of WarGames. Badham also directed and released Blue Thunder the same year; it was yet another film that questioned man's reliance on machines for protection. Badham reinforced this idea in an interview for American Film by Naomi Glauberman, saying WarGames "is about the ability of technology to take over our lives, so the tail is wagging the dog, us being the dog. And the tail is going to wag us right out the window. The China Syndrome is about that. The more powerful and the more authority we delegate to computers, the more things we are abdicating. And that's where it gets to be dangerous. Suddenly the roles are reversed and then, in a true Harold Pinter situation, we don't know who's the servant and who's the master." Producer: Leonard Goldberg, Harold Schneider Director: John Badham Screenplay: William A. Fraker, Walon Green, Lawrence Lasker, Walter Parkes Production Design: Angelo P. Graham, Richard Hashimoto Cinematography: William A. Fraker Costume Design: Barry Delaney, Linda Matthews Film Editing: Michael Ripps, Tom Rolf Original Music: Arthur B. Rubinstein Principal Cast: Matthew Broderick (David Lightman), Dabney Coleman (John McKittrick), John Wood (Stephen Falken), Ally Sheedy (Jennifer Mack), Barry Corbin (General Beringer), Juanin Clay (Pat Healy), Kent Williams (Arthur Cabot), Dennis Lipscomb (Lyle Watson). C-113m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Scott McGee

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States May 1983

Released in United States Summer June 3, 1983

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States May 1983

Released in United States Summer June 3, 1983