Red Dawn


1h 54m 1984

Brief Synopsis

When the Soviet Union and Cuba invade the United States and paratroop into a small mid-western town, a group of teens band together to fight off their occupiers.

Film Details

Also Known As
Röd Gryning
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Action
War
Release Date
1984
Production Company
George Geren
Location
New Mexico, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

When the Soviet Union and Cuba invade the United States and paratroop into a small mid-western town, a group of teens band together to fight off their occupiers.

Crew

Brandy Alexander

Set Designer

Lance Anderson

Makeup

George Anton

On-Set Dresser

Bub Asman

Sound Editor

Bob Atkinson

Other

James Ballard

Helicopter Pilot

Alex Bamattre

Sound Editor

Roy Barnes

Set Designer

Dave Bassett

Transportation Captain

Barry Beckerman

Producer

Sidney Beckerman

Executive Producer

Jim Behnke

Assistant Director

John Boldroff

Grip

Carl Boles

Gaffer

Fred J Brown

Sound Editor

Don Butler

Craft Service

Kenny Call

Stunts

Ron Cardarelli

Key Grip

Kevin Chambers

On-Set Dresser

Lowell Chambers

Set Decorator

Joan E Chapman

Assistant Editor

Dan Chichester

Costumes

Harley Christensen

Electrician

Bill Cody

Production Assistant

Dick Collean

Camera Operator

Terry Collis

Transportation Coordinator

Vincent Cresciman

Art Director

Greg Curtis

Special Effects Assistant

Joe D'agosta

Casting

Cariline Davis-dyer

Script Supervisor

Wes Dawn

Makeup

Karen Day

Auditor

Jackson Degovia

Production Designer

Carlos Delarios

Sound

Julie Starr Dresner

Costumes

Captain John Early

Technical Advisor

Buddy L Edmondson

Stunts

Tom Elliott

Stunts

Juno J. Ellis

Sound Editor

Fred Elmes

Camera Operator

Buzz Feitshans

Assistant Camera Operator

Buzz Feitshans

Producer

Thomas L. Fisher

Special Effects

Cindy Folkerson

Stunts

Tom Furginson

On-Set Dresser

Ross Gallichotte

Set Designer

Ron Galloway

Property Master Assistant

Linda Gehring

Other

Tom Gehrke

Helicopter Pilot

Arthur Gelb

Graphic Designer

George Geren

Cable Operator

Noah Golden

Production Assistant

Adrian Gorton

Assistant Art Director

Walt Hadfield

Construction Coordinator

Clifford Happy

Stunts

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Denise Horta

Adr Editor

Chris Howell

Stunts

Sally Jackson

Casting

Terry Jackson

Stunts

Michael Jarvis

Location Manager

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Greg Jensen

Other

John R Jensen

Construction Coordinator

Soren Elung Jensen

Stunts

George Jenson

Art Department

Frank Jimenez

Sound Editor

Joe Kenworthy

Sound

Dana Kershner

Photography

Kevin King

Production Accountant

Michael J Kohut

Sound

F Mako Koiwai

Assistant Camera Operator

Terry Leonard

Unit Director

Terry Leonard

Stunt Coordinator

Elisabeth Leustig

Casting Associate

Steve Lippert

Other

George L. Little

Costume Supervisor

Bob Lockrow

Stunts

Harry Lojewski

Music Supervisor

Saralo Macgregor

Assistant

C J Maguire

Props

Lou Mann

Set Designer

Dale Martin

Special Effects

Anna Mcdonnell

Liaison

Michael H Mcgaughy

Stunts

Lola Mcnalley

Hair

Greig Mcritchie

Original Music

Jimmy Medearis

Stunts

John Milius

Screenplay

Jim Moffett

Other

Ray Moggio

Location Manager

Tom Moore

Assistant Editor

Bob Munson

Transportation Captain

Rick Neff

Camera Operator

Vic Nerone

Other

Barbara Niensen

Production Coordinator

Thom Noble

Editor

Lauren Palmer

Adr Editor

Dennis Parrish

Property Master

Basil Poledouris

Music

Tony Pono

Grip

Jim Porter

Electrician

Paul Power

Graphic Designer

Darrell Pritchett

Special Effects Assistant

Will Purcell

Special Effects Assistant

Tom Radelli

On-Set Dresser

Jeff Ramsey

Stunts

Glenn H Randall

Stunts

Larry Randles

Stunts

Ken Reed

Other

Fred Rexer

Technical Advisor

Kevin Reynolds

From Story

Kevin Reynolds

Story By

Kevin Reynolds

Screenplay

Ross Reynolds

Stunts

Keith Richins

Special Effects

Mike Ritt

Assistant Camera Operator

Aaron Rochin

Sound

Thomas Rosales Jr.

Stunts

Kerry Rossall

Stunts

Peter Samish

Set Designer

Darla Sather

Production Assistant

Elliot Schick

Unit Production Manager

Arne L Schmidt

Assistant Director

Curtis A Schnell

Set Designer

Mark Schultz

Grip

Ben R Scott

Stunts

John-clay Scott

Stunts

John Shannon

Photography

Michele Sharp

Sound Editor

Peggy Shinhoffen

Casting

Steve Shubin

Wardrobe Assistant

Jack Smalley

Original Music

Scott Smalley

Original Music

Carol Jean Smetana

Assistant Director

Frank J Sparks

Stunts

Baird Steptoe

Assistant Camera Operator

Mark Stivers

Other

Ted T Sugiura

Camera Operator

Bob Thorson

Auditor

James E Tocci

Set Designer

Ken Tosic

Electrician

Paul Vakay

Electrician

Joe Vinetz

Electrician

Ric Waite

Dp/Cinematographer

Ric Waite

Director Of Photography

Scott Wead

Helicopter Pilot

Michael D Weldon

Assistant Camera Operator

Don Whipple

Dolly Grip

Hal Whitby

Boom Operator

Dana White

Other

Stan Witt

Sound Editor

Clay Wright

Helicopter Pilot

Art Young

Wardrobe Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Röd Gryning
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Action
War
Release Date
1984
Production Company
George Geren
Location
New Mexico, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

Lane Smith (1936-2005)


Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976).

In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984).

Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993).

For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob.

by Michael T. Toole
Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976). In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984). Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993). For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob. by Michael T. Toole

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)


Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66.

O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate.

After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight.

O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979).

His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal.

by Michael T. Toole

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)

Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66. O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate. After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight. O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979). His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 10, 1984

Released in USA on video.

Completed shooting July 1984.

Released in United States Summer August 10, 1984