Spring Is Here


1h 8m 1930
Spring Is Here

Brief Synopsis

A young woman is torn between the nice guy her father likes and the bad boy he doesn't.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Apr 13, 1930
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Spring Is Here by Owen Davis, Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers (New York, 11 Mar 1929).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,386ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Peter Braley, the blustering father of Betty, disapproves of her affection for Steve Alden, whom Betty favors in preference to Terry Clayton, another suitor, and he loses all patience with her on discovering she has returned home at 5 a. m. with Steve. Discouraged, Terry is advised by Mary Jane, Betty's 18-year-old sister, to make Betty jealous; and on the first opportune occasion, he reveals unsuspected ability in capturing the attention of susceptible women, making sure that Betty is aware of it. Although Betty's jealousy is aroused, she carries through, but when her father banishes Alden from his house and he returns to elope with Betty, Terry intervenes and carries her off himself.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Apr 13, 1930
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Spring Is Here by Owen Davis, Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers (New York, 11 Mar 1929).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,386ft (8 reels)

Articles

Spring is Here -


Before Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald, the screen's great operetta team was Alexander Gray and Bernice Claire, a pair of musical theatre performers who co-starred in three features, all in 1930. This adaptation of a popular Rodgers and Hart show is the only one to survive, with the earlier No, No Nanette and the later The Song of the Flame mostly lost. Claire stars as an heiress torn between the millionaire playboy (Lawrence Gray, no relation) who thrills her and the more serious millionaire playboy (the other Gray) her father (Ford Sterling) wants her to marry. Complicating matters are a younger sister (Inez Courtney) who wants A. Gray for her own and a daffy mother (Louise Fazenda) whose advice might help if it made any sense. As happened so often, Hollywood only kept a few of the songs from the original, with Claire and Alexander Gray dueting charmingly on the popular "Yours Sincerely" and a reprise of "With a Song in My Heart." The other songs were provided by Sam Lewis, Joe Young and Harry Warren, and one "Cryin' for the Carolines," actually became a modest hit. But that wasn't enough to help the film. Released during a glut of musical pictures, it lost money.

By Frank Miller
Spring Is Here -

Spring is Here -

Before Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald, the screen's great operetta team was Alexander Gray and Bernice Claire, a pair of musical theatre performers who co-starred in three features, all in 1930. This adaptation of a popular Rodgers and Hart show is the only one to survive, with the earlier No, No Nanette and the later The Song of the Flame mostly lost. Claire stars as an heiress torn between the millionaire playboy (Lawrence Gray, no relation) who thrills her and the more serious millionaire playboy (the other Gray) her father (Ford Sterling) wants her to marry. Complicating matters are a younger sister (Inez Courtney) who wants A. Gray for her own and a daffy mother (Louise Fazenda) whose advice might help if it made any sense. As happened so often, Hollywood only kept a few of the songs from the original, with Claire and Alexander Gray dueting charmingly on the popular "Yours Sincerely" and a reprise of "With a Song in My Heart." The other songs were provided by Sam Lewis, Joe Young and Harry Warren, and one "Cryin' for the Carolines," actually became a modest hit. But that wasn't enough to help the film. Released during a glut of musical pictures, it lost money. By Frank Miller

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