The Three Musketeers


2h 5m 1948
The Three Musketeers

Brief Synopsis

Athletic adaptation of Alexandre Dumas' classic adventure about the king's musketeers and their mission to protect France.

Photos & Videos

The Three Musketeers (1948) - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
The Three Musketeers (1948) - Movie Poster
Angela Lansbury - Publicity Stills

Film Details

Also Known As
Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Nov 26, 1948
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 19 Nov 1948; New York opening: 20 Nov 1948
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Cheviot Hills, California, United States; Pasadena--Busch Gardens, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Les trois mousquetaires by Alexandre Dumas, père (Paris, 1844).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

In 1625, D'Artagnan, an eager young swordsman living in the small village of Gascon, France, sets out for Paris to seek a better life. In Paris, D'Artagnan meets Treville, the captain of King Louis XIII's musketeers, and asks to join Aramis, Porthos and Athos, the king's best musketeers, by whom he had been good-naturedly fooled on the road to Paris. Treville initially rejects D'Artagnan's request, but D'Artagnan later secures his place with the elite musketeers after fighting a series of duels and proving himself to be an expert swordsman. Soon after joining the musketeers, D'Artagnan learns that Cardinal Richelieu, the king's first minister, is secretly betraying the king and is determined to wage war against England. Treville is aware of Richelieu's betrayal but warns D'Artagnan that the king's position is tenuous and that D'Artagnan must not humiliate or provoke Richelieu's men. One day, Monsieur Bonacieux, D'Artagnan's landlord, asks D'Artagnan to look after his goddaughter Constance while he is away on a journey. Bonacieux tells D'Artagnan that Constance, who is one of the queen's maids, is in constant danger and that she is being followed by Richelieu's men. Before leaving on his journey, Bonacieux shows D'Artagnan a secret door in the apartment floor through which he may spy on Constance. When D'Artagnan sees Constance for the first time, he falls instantly in love with her. Late at night, after hearing screams from the apartment below, D'Artagnan dashes downstairs to rescue Constance and single-handedly fights off several of Richelieu's men. D'Artagnan is badly beaten in the fight but he quickly forgets his injuries when Constance gives him a small kiss. He then professes his love for Constance and they seal their love with a real kiss. Later, D'Artagnan follows Constance to her secret rendezvous with the English Duke of Buckingham. In a fit of jealousy, D'Artagnan challenges the duke to a duel, but the duel is called off when D'Artagnan learns that the furtive meeting has been arranged to deliver the duke to Queen Anne, with whom he is engaged in a secret affair. Before the duke returns to England, Anne gives him a keepsake of twelve large, perfectly matched diamond studs, which the king has given her as a gift. When Richelieu learns from one of his agents that Anne gave the studs to the duke, he sends an accomplice, the beautiful Lady de Winter, to England to steal two of the diamonds so that he can expose the affair and force the king to consent to a war with England. Determined to prevent the affair from being exposed, Constance sends D'Artagnan to England to get the studs before Richelieu finds them. D'Artagnan promises to return with the jewels before the banquet at which the queen is expected to be wearing all her diamonds. D'Artagnan enlists the help of the other musketeers to get the jewels back, and as soon as they arrive in England they engage Richelieu's men in a battle. D'Artagnan arrives at the duke's estate too late, and discovers that two of the diamonds have already been stolen by Lady de Winter. While Lady de Winters set out to deliver the diamonds to Richelieu, the king's musketeers search for Athos, who, in a fit of depression over his past, has gotten violently drunk. Following several misadventures, the musketeers take exact duplicates of the missing gems, which have been made by the duke's jeweler, to France in time to deliver them to the Queen for the banquet. His scheme foiled, Richelieu exacts his revenge by arresting Constance and holding her captive. Richelieu refuses to release Constance until D'Artagnan consents to join forces with him as his lieutenant. When D'Artagnan refuses, Richelieu instructs Lady de Winter to use her persuasive charms to seduce him. The other musketeers later condemn D'Artagnan for consorting with Lady de Winter in order to continue his romance with Constance. D'Artagnan, however, insists that he is merely trying to win Lady de Winter's confidence to find out where Constance is being held. D'Artagnan devises an elaborate scheme to trick Lady de Winter into revealing Constance's whereabouts, but he later undermines his own scheme when he succumbs to Lady de Winter's charms and reveals his plan. Meanwhile, the queen's aides find and release Constance and deliver her to D'Artagnan's quarters. A hasty wedding is arranged between D'Artagnan and Constance before Constance is sent to Buckingham for safety. Soon after, the war between France and England breaks out, and Lady de Winter follows D'Artagnan to England, determined to exact revenge against him for tricking her. Warned of Lady de Winter's treachery, the Duke arrests her and places her under Constance's supervision. When D'Artagnan learns of the arrest, he races to the Duke's estate, hoping to prevent a tragedy. He arrives too late, however, as Lady de Winter has killed both Constance and the Duke. The musketeers eventually find Lady de Winter, who it is revealed, was once married to Athos, and after delivering her to the executioner, they fight off the last of Richelieu's men and bring the war to an end.

Cast

Lana Turner

Lady de Winter

Gene Kelly

D'Artagnan

June Allyson

Constance [Bonacieux]

Van Heflin

Athos

Angela Lansbury

Queen Anne

Frank Morgan

King Louis XVIII

Vincent Price

Richelieu

Keenan Wynn

Planchet

John Sutton

The Duke of Buckingham

Gig Young

Porthos

Robert Coote

Aramis

Reginald Owen

Treville

Ian Keith

Rochefort

Patricia Medina

Kitty

Richard Stapley

Albert

Byron Foulger

Bonacieux

Sol Gorss

Jussac

Richard Simmons

Count DeWardes

Robert Warwick

D'Artanan, Sr.

Wm. "bill" Phillips

Grimaud

Albert Morin

Bazin

Norman Leavitt

Mousqueton

Marie Windsor

Dark-eyed woman

Ruth Robinson

Mother

Dickie Dubins

Brother

Charles Bates

Brother

David Bair

Brother

Tom Tyler

Traveler

Michael Kostrick

Traveler

William Tannen

Traveler

Wheaton Chambers

Traveler

Gordon Clark

Musketeer

Gregg Barton

Musketeer

Tom Stevenson

Subaltern

Reginald Sheffield

Subaltern

Leonard Penn

Companion

Fred Coby

Companion

Kirk Alyn

Friend

John Holland

Friend

David Bond

Friend

Noel Howard

Richelieu guard

Roland Hughston

Richelieu guard

Allen Pinson

Richelieu guard

Bert Lebaron

Richelieu guard

William Edmunds

Landlord

Irene Seidner

Landlord's wife

Francis Mcdonald

Fisherman

Jack Stoney

Fisherman

Wilson Benge

Valet

Alec Harford

Valet

Frank J. Marlo

Guard

William Norton Bailey

Guard

Carl Saxe

Guard

Gil Perkins

Guard

Jeff York

Officer

Paul Kruger

Officer

Vernon Downing

Officer

Paul Maxey

Major domo

Arthur Hohl

Host at Dragon Rouge

Paul Newlan

Musketeer guard

David Thursby

Innkeeper

Jean Louis Heremans

Cardinal guard

Jack Shea

Sentry

Douglas Evans

British officer

Mickey Simpson

Executioner

Redmond Doms

Jack Owen

Photo Collections

The Three Musketeers (1948) - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes of MGM's The Three Musketeers (1948), starring Gene Kelly, June Allyson, and Van Heflin.
The Three Musketeers (1948) - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Three Musketeers (1948). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Angela Lansbury - Publicity Stills
Here are several stills of Angela Lansbury, taken to help publicize The Three Musketeers (1948). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Nov 26, 1948
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 19 Nov 1948; New York opening: 20 Nov 1948
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Cheviot Hills, California, United States; Pasadena--Busch Gardens, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Les trois mousquetaires by Alexandre Dumas, père (Paris, 1844).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

1948

Articles

The Three Musketeers (1948)


Swashbuckler, according to Merriam Webster, is a flamboyant soldier, adventurer or daredevil. If there were a section in Webster's Dictionary for Swashbuckling films, George Sidney's 1948 version of The Three Musketeers would have to be at the top of the list. Made at MGM, the Rolls Royce of movie studios at the time, The Three Musketeers has a star-studded cast that includes sexy Lana Turner, June Allyson, Angela Lansbury, Van Heflin, Vincent Price, Gig Young, and the electrifying Gene Kelly (whose character and performance are synonymous with the term swashbuckling).

The Three Musketeers was an extremely personal project for Kelly for two reasons. The first was the fact that he was recreating the character (D'Artagnan) played by his favorite star (Douglas Fairbanks) in his favorite movie (the 1921 version of The Three Musketeers). Kelly was later quoted in Tony Thomas' The Films of Gene Kelly: Song and Dance saying "I loved playing this part. As a boy I idolized Fairbanks, Sr. and I raised myself to be a gymnast." The second reason is that Kelly was hoping his performance in The Three Musketeers would convince MGM to let him do a musical version of Edmond Rostand's Cyrano De Bergerac.. Regardless of his energetic performance in The Three Musketeers, the studio brass wouldn't go for a musical Cyrano even though Kelly pestered them for years about it.

Not all the cast members were as thrilled as Kelly to do The Three Musketeers. June Allyson, in her autobiography June Allyson, revealed how uncomfortable she felt playing Constance Bonacieux. " . . .I wanted out of the picture. I never felt comfortable doing a period piece. . .I looked at myself in my sweeping robes and was not convincible that anyone was going to believe me as Lady Constance." Lana Turner also had a few problems accepting her role as Lady De Winter. According to her autobiography Lana: The Lady, the Legend, the Truth, Lana Turner refused to do the movie because she didn't have a starring role. MGM combated her refusal with a stern suspension. After negotiations and a rewriting of the script, Lana Turner agreed to do the film. But when all was said and done, the movie was a box office success and became an instant classic.

Director: George Sidney
Producer: Pandro S. Berman
Screenplay: Robert Ardrey (based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas)
Cinematography: Robert H. Planck
Editor: George Boemler, Robert Kern
Art Direction: Malcolm Brown, Cedric Gibbons
Music: Herbert Stothart
Cast: Gene Kelly (D'Artagnan), Lana Turner (Lady de Winter), June Allyson (Constance Bonacieux), Van Heflin (Athos), Angela Lansbury (Queen Anne), Vincent Price (Cardinal Richelieu), Keenan Wynn (Planchet), Frank Morgan (King Louis XIII), Gig Young (Porthos)
C-126m. Close captioning. Descriptive Video.

by Rod Hollimon
The Three Musketeers (1948)

The Three Musketeers (1948)

Swashbuckler, according to Merriam Webster, is a flamboyant soldier, adventurer or daredevil. If there were a section in Webster's Dictionary for Swashbuckling films, George Sidney's 1948 version of The Three Musketeers would have to be at the top of the list. Made at MGM, the Rolls Royce of movie studios at the time, The Three Musketeers has a star-studded cast that includes sexy Lana Turner, June Allyson, Angela Lansbury, Van Heflin, Vincent Price, Gig Young, and the electrifying Gene Kelly (whose character and performance are synonymous with the term swashbuckling). The Three Musketeers was an extremely personal project for Kelly for two reasons. The first was the fact that he was recreating the character (D'Artagnan) played by his favorite star (Douglas Fairbanks) in his favorite movie (the 1921 version of The Three Musketeers). Kelly was later quoted in Tony Thomas' The Films of Gene Kelly: Song and Dance saying "I loved playing this part. As a boy I idolized Fairbanks, Sr. and I raised myself to be a gymnast." The second reason is that Kelly was hoping his performance in The Three Musketeers would convince MGM to let him do a musical version of Edmond Rostand's Cyrano De Bergerac.. Regardless of his energetic performance in The Three Musketeers, the studio brass wouldn't go for a musical Cyrano even though Kelly pestered them for years about it. Not all the cast members were as thrilled as Kelly to do The Three Musketeers. June Allyson, in her autobiography June Allyson, revealed how uncomfortable she felt playing Constance Bonacieux. " . . .I wanted out of the picture. I never felt comfortable doing a period piece. . .I looked at myself in my sweeping robes and was not convincible that anyone was going to believe me as Lady Constance." Lana Turner also had a few problems accepting her role as Lady De Winter. According to her autobiography Lana: The Lady, the Legend, the Truth, Lana Turner refused to do the movie because she didn't have a starring role. MGM combated her refusal with a stern suspension. After negotiations and a rewriting of the script, Lana Turner agreed to do the film. But when all was said and done, the movie was a box office success and became an instant classic. Director: George Sidney Producer: Pandro S. Berman Screenplay: Robert Ardrey (based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas) Cinematography: Robert H. Planck Editor: George Boemler, Robert Kern Art Direction: Malcolm Brown, Cedric Gibbons Music: Herbert Stothart Cast: Gene Kelly (D'Artagnan), Lana Turner (Lady de Winter), June Allyson (Constance Bonacieux), Van Heflin (Athos), Angela Lansbury (Queen Anne), Vincent Price (Cardinal Richelieu), Keenan Wynn (Planchet), Frank Morgan (King Louis XIII), Gig Young (Porthos) C-126m. Close captioning. Descriptive Video. by Rod Hollimon

Quotes

Trivia

'Taylor, Robert' and Ricardo Montalban and 'Greenstreet, Sidney' were originally cast as Athos, Aramis and Richelieu.

Lana Turner originally accepted a studio suspension in preference to playing Lady de Winter because she considered Milady a secondary character.

Richelieu is referred to as prime minister and almost all traces of him being a cardinal or a man of the church have been removed (although Jean Heremans is still credited as "Cardinal Guard").

Because of feared pressure from church groups, M-G-M changed Richelieu from a cardinal to a prime minister, even though his true clerical office had been shown in many other films without any repercussions.

Notes

The opening title card reads: "Metro-Goldwn-Mayer Presents Alexander Dumas' The Three Musketeers." A written onscreen prologue to the film reads: "In the year of Our Lord 1625, William Shakespeare was not long dead, America not long settled, and the calm of France not long for this world. A Gascon villager was preparing to go forth and shake that world till its teeth rattled." A December 1947 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that director George Sidney planned to shoot his own version of the film with a 16mm camera, alongside the studio's 35mm cameras, but no further information regarding a 16mm version has been found. A December 1947 article in New York Times indicates that a representative of the National Catholic Legion of Decency, an organization that monitored the interests of the Church in motion pictures, objected to the characterization of Cardinal Richelieu in M-G-M's planned adaptation of Dumas' story. In a letter to M-G-M producer Pandro S. Berman, the organization stated its objection to the cardinal being portrayed as a "worldly and unscrupulous man" and urged the studio to remove the character from the film. The New York Times article notes that Berman refused to remove the character from the film but promised he would use great caution in all sensitive matters pertaining to the story. Berman also indicated that "Constance," who is the married mistress of "D'Artagnan" in the novel, would be unmarried in the film version.
       A contemporary news item in Hollywood Reporter notes that Roy Rowland filled in as director of the film's screen tests in December 1947 while Sidney was recovering from an illness. A December 12, 1947 Los Angeles Times news item announced that Sydney Greenstreet and Sonya Tufts had been cast. Hollywood Reporter production charts include Frances Gifford in the cast, but she was not in the film. According to a January 1948 Hollywood Reporter news item, Lana Turner initially refused her assignment and was briefly suspended by M-G-M as a result. The picture marked Turner's first screen appearance in a color feature. While a February 1948 Daily Variety article put the final cost of the film at $4,000,000, it is more likely that the cost was closer to the $2,500,000 figure listed in modern sources. The Three Musketeers opened to mostly favorable reviews, with several reviewers commenting on the film's unusual tongue-in-cheek approach. The New York Times reviewer likened Turner's portrayal of "Lady de Winter" to a "company-mannered Mae West" and noted that "more glittering swordplay, more dazzling costumes, more colors or more of Miss Turner's chest have never been seen in a picture than are shown in this one." The film received an Academy Award nomination in the catagory of Best Cinematography.
       Modern sources relate the following information about that film: screenwriter Robert Ardry was displeased with Sidney's irreverent approach to the Dumas story and objected to the spoof elements that were added to the film. Robert Taylor and Ricardo Montalban were originally announced to play two of the musketeers, and Greenstreet was set to play the third. During Turner's suspension, M-G-M began a search for her possible replacement and, at one point, considered actress Alida Valli, who was then under contract to David O. Selznick. In her autobiography, June Allyson notes that she did not feel comfortable doing a period piece, and that she tried to get out of her assignment in the picture. A biography of Kelly noted that Belgian fencing champion Jean Heremans, who appears in the film as the cardinal's guard, taught Kelly how to fence. Kelly's biography also noted that during the filming of a bedroom scene, Kelly flung Turner onto a bed with such force that she fell to the ground and suffered a broken elbow. Some filming took place at Busch Gardens in Pasadena, and at the Cheviot Hill golf course near Culver City, CA. According to the New York Times obituary for stuntman Russell M. Saunders, Saunders acted as Kelly's stunt double in the film.
       Among the many film versions of Dumas' story are the 1914 Film Attractions Co. production, directed by Charles V. Henkel (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.4457); the 1921 Douglas Fairbanks production, directed by Fred Niblo (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.5665); the 1935 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. production, directed by Rowland V. Lee and starring Walter Abel, Paul Lucas and Margot Grahame (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.4618); Richard Lester's 1974 Twentieth Century-Fox production starring Michael York, Oliver Reed, Richard Chamberlain and Raquel Welch; and the 1993 Buena Vista release, directed by Stephen Herek and starring Charlie Sheen, Kiefer Sutherland, Chris O'Donnell and Rebecca de Mornay. According to a 1962 news item in Daily Variety, Gene Kelly was planning to play D'Artagnan again in a Carlo Ponti production entitled Cyrano and D'Artagnan. The film, which was to co-star Peter Sellers as Cyrano, was never made.