Joe and Ethel Turp Call on the President


1h 10m 1939

Film Details

Also Known As
A Call on the President
Release Date
Dec 1, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "A Call on the President" by Damon Runyon in The Saturday Evening Post (21 Aug 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

When Jim Martin, Brooklyn's favorite postman, is arrested for tearing up a registered letter addressed to the widow Kitty Crusper, Joe and Ethel Turp take the matter up with the duly constituted authorities. However, when parish priest Bishop Bannon and Democratic Club president Pat Donegan claim they can do nothing because it is a federal matter, the Turps decide to call on the President. Taking the day off to drive to Washington, the Turps go to the White House, where the President, curious to know what the average person is thinking, agrees to see them. Joe and Ethel then tell him the story of their beloved postman, Jim, who, years earlier, fell in love with Kitty O'Brien: Jim is about to ask Kitty to marry him when he learns that she is already engaged to Henry Crusper. Devastated, Jim leaves to ride the railroad mail cars for twelve years until he learns that Henry has died, leaving Kitty alone to rear their young son Johnny. To help Kitty, Jim quits his railroad job and returns to his old mail route in Brooklyn. Even Jim's kindly influence is unable to help Johnny, the bad seed. The night that Kitty and Jim plan to announce their engagement, Johnny is involved in an armed holdup and blackmails Jim for money to leave town. After Johnny's departure, Kitty becomes ill, prompting Jim to forge letters to her, signed by Johnny. Every week for two years, Kitty receives a letter from her son until Jim opens the fateful registered letter from San Quentin, notifying her that Johnny died during an attempted escape. Knowing that the news will kill the frail Kitty, Jim destroys the letter and is arrested by the police for his deed. Back at the White House, the President takes pity on Jim, and when the Turps return home to Brooklyn, they discover that the mailman has been pardoned.

Film Details

Also Known As
A Call on the President
Release Date
Dec 1, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "A Call on the President" by Damon Runyon in The Saturday Evening Post (21 Aug 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this picture was A Call on the President. "The Turps" were regular characters in Damon Runyon's newspaper feature entitled The Brighter Side.