International Squadron


1h 27m 1941

Brief Synopsis

A hotshot flyer endangers his colleagues in the Royal Air Force as they fly against the Nazis.

Film Details

Also Known As
Flight Patrol
Genre
Romance
War
Adaptation
Release Date
Oct 11, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the play Ceiling Zero by Frank Wead (New York, 10 Apr 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,780ft

Synopsis

American flying ace Jimmy Grant is a daredevil when it comes to flying airplanes, but when his friend, Royal Air Force Squadron Leader Charles Wyatt, encourages him to join the International Squadron of the RAF, Jimmy turns him down flat, saying that he intends to stay safe at home. Faced with a breach-of-promise suit, however, Jimmy agrees to deliver a new American-designed airplane to the RAF and leaves for Europe with his mechanic, "Omaha" McGrath. Over the airport, a heavy fog rolls in, and Charlie advises Jimmy to bail out of his plane, but Jimmy manages to land safely. The pilots who make up the squadron come from everywhere in Europe that the Nazis have invaded. The international crew even includes Americans such as Jimmy's friend, Lt. Rog Wilkins. Jimmy tries to interest his two friends in a night on the town, but both Charlie and Rog are now happily married and have no interest in chasing women. Left to his own devices, Jimmy pursues Jeanette, the young French woman who is assigned as his driver. While they are having dinner, the city is bombed by the Germans. Impressed by British courage and pluck and moved by the death of a child, Jimmy joins the RAF. Military discipline does not completely curb Jimmy's independent streak. During an air patrol, Jimmy's grandstanding results in the downing of a German bomber, but also causes the death of an RAF flyer. Only Charlie's intervention saves Jimmy from dismissal. Jimmy fails to take this lesson to heart, however, and when a dinner with Jeanette interferes with his patrol duty, he asks Rog to substitute for him. Even though Rog is exhausted by twenty uninterrupted hours of duty, he agrees and is shot down. After Rog dies, Jimmy wants to quit, but Charlie convinces him that it is his duty to continue Rog's job. Later Michele Edmé, Jeanette's boyfriend, draws the lot for a difficult mission. Jimmy, who believes he should be the one to risk his life, knocks Michele unconscious and takes the flight. Jimmy successfully completes the bombing mission, but is attacked by German planes before he can return home. After shooting down several planes, Jimmy is himself shot down and crashes to his death. At the airbase the squadron drinks a toast in tribute to him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Flight Patrol
Genre
Romance
War
Adaptation
Release Date
Oct 11, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the play Ceiling Zero by Frank Wead (New York, 10 Apr 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,780ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film begins with the following written dedication and quotation: "To the men of the Royal Air Force...and to those exiled flyers who still fight for their homelands in England's skies...this story is respectfully dedicated. 'Never before in the field of human conflict have so many, owed so much, to so few....'-Winston Churchill."
       The film's working title was Flight Patrol. News items in Hollywood Reporter add the following information about the production: Both Dennis Morgan and Humphrey Bogart tested for parts in the film. Footage of actual fighting between British Spitfires and German Messerschmitts and Heinkels and a London air raid were shot by technicians from Warner Bros.' Teddington studios in London and shipped to the United States for inclusion in the film. This was the last film of actor James Stephenson, who died soon after the film finished shooting. A press release dated April 16, 1941 identifies technical advisor Byron Kennerly as a pilot officer in the Eagle Squadron of the RAF. Lothar Mendes is listed as director in the early Hollywood Reporter production charts and, although Lew Seiler is credited on the screen, both Film Daily and New York Times reviews give directing credit to Mendes. Frank Wead's play was also the basis for the 1936 Warner Bros.' film Ceiling Zero, starring James Cagney and Pat O'Brien and directed by Howard Hawks (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.0640).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1941

Released in United States 1941