My Favorite Wife


1h 28m 1940
My Favorite Wife

Brief Synopsis

A shipwrecked woman is rescued just in time for her husband's re-marriage.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
May 17, 1940
Premiere Information
Louisville, KY premiere: 2 May 1940
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

After being shipwrecked on an island off the coast of Indonesia for seven years, Ellen Arden returns home on the very day that her husband Nick has had her declared dead so that he can marry Bianca Bates. After learning from her sympathetic mother-in-law that Nicky has left for Yosemite on his honeymoon, Ellen flies off to the honeymoon lodge, the same one, in fact, where she and Nicky spent their own honeymoon. When Nick sees Ellen just as he enters the lodge elevator with Bianca, he can't believe his eyes, but soon discovers that his beloved Ellen has returned. After his initial elation at having Ellen back, however, he is soon confronted with the reality that he now has two wives. Although he admits to Ellen that he never really loved Bianca, whom he met on the boat on the way back from searching for Ellen, Nicky cannot bring himself to tell Bianca that she is a lame duck. Instead, he thinks of a variety of excuses why he must leave their honeymoon suite and not behave as a bridgegroom should. Bianca is certain that there is something wrong with Nicky, especially when they return home and he refuses to tell his children, Tim and Chinch, that Bianca is their stepmother. Ellen decides to torment him by masquerading as a friend of the family from the South. After Bianca goes to bed with a headache and calls her mother to complain about Nicky's eratic behavior, Nicky receives a late-night visit from an insurance investigator representing the company which paid Ellen's life insurance policy. He indirectly learns from the man that Ellen was not alone in her seven year ordeal, but was kept company by Stephen Burkett. He also learns that after their rescue, crew members of the Portuguese freighter that picked up the pair reported that he called her "Eve" and she called him "Adam." Nicky confronts Ellen about Stephen, whom she had neglected to mention, but she dismisses Stephen as a harmless old man. Now crazy with jealousy, Nicky decides to find Stephen, whom Ellen said would be residing at the Y.M.C.A., and, much to Nicky's chagrin, he discovers Stephen to be an athletic Adonis who is staying at the Pacific Club. Meanwhile, not knowing that Nicky has located Stephen, Ellen finds a mousey shoe salesman whom she thinks would be a perfect alter ego and passes him off to Nicky as her island companion. Pretending not to suspect anything, Nicky then takes Ellen to lunch at the Pacific Club, where he and Stephen finally meet face-to-face. The embarassed Ellen takes an unintended plunge into the club's pool, requiring Nicky to go home and get some clothes for her. As Nicky goes through Ellen's closets looking for a suitable outfit, Bianca sends in a psychiatrist whom she has called in to straighten him out. Just when the befuddled Nicky is trying to explain his actions to Bianca and the psychiatrist, however, the police arrive and arrest him for bigamy. In court, Nicky's domestic conundrum is finally exposed as he, Bianca, Ellen and Stephen try to sort out the complicated details of the case to the judge. After various unsatisfactory explanations are offered, the judge finally grants Bianca an annulment, and she happily leaves after socking Nicky. The judge then has to declare Ellen legally alive, reversing his former decision that she was legally dead, and decides to take the matter under consideration. With all of the strain of the last few days, Nicky declares that he needs time to think. Irked by her husband's lack of commitment, Ellen decides to go away and think as well, leaving Stephen to return to the island alone. Finally, Nicky decides to drive Ellen and the children, who still do not know that she is their real mother, to their old mountain cabin. He plans to leave, but the roads are closed and he is forced to spend the night. After the children happily reveal that they know Ellen is their mother, and after Mrs. Arden telephones Ellen to say that the judge has declared her legally alive and her marriage is intact, Ellen says goodnight to Nicky and tells him to sleep in the attic. Several attempts to sleep in Ellen's bedroom prove fruitless, and she tells him to take a sixty-day cruise and come back around Christmas. After hearing considerable noise coming from the attic, Ellen is soon surprised when Nicky enters the room in a Santa Claus suit and wishes her a Merry Christmas.

Photo Collections

My Favorite Wife - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from RKO's My Favorite Wife (1940), directed by Garson Kanin and starring Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, and Randolph Scott.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
May 17, 1940
Premiere Information
Louisville, KY premiere: 2 May 1940
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1940

Best Score

1940

Best Writing, Screenplay

1941

Articles

My Favorite Wife


Based on Lord Tennyson's poem, "Enoch Arden," My Favorite Wife (1940) once again pairs Irene Dunne and Cary Grant in a romantic farce. The two first appeared together in The Awful Truth (1937), a classic screwball comedy directed by Leo McCarey. Working with Sam and Bella Spewack on the original story, McCarey intended to direct My Favorite Wife, but prior to filming he was involved in a very serious car accident, forcing him to relinquish his directorial responsibilities. Instead, McCarey tapped screenwriter Garson Kanin to direct and the prominent scenarist rose to the occasion quite successfully. McCarey was able to produce the movie, enjoying continued involvement in his pet project, and along with the Spewacks, received Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay for their work. My Favorite Wife also received Oscar nominations for Best Score (Roy Webb) and Best Art Direction (Van Nest Polglase and Mark-Lee Kirk).

The movie was one of six films based on Tennyson's poem. McCarey originally planned the film for Jean Arthur under the working title, Woman Overboard, but she was committed to other projects (she eventually made a film - Too Many Husbands (1940) - which had a similar plot). Other versions of "Enoch Arden" include D.W. Griffith's film of the same name, which premiered in 1911. Another version, Something's Got to Give, went into production in 1962 with Marilyn Monroe but was never completed since the actress dropped out during filming (it was her final film project). Shortly afterward, Doris Day and James Garner were cast in a remake entitled Move Over, Darling (1963).

The original premise of "Enoch Arden" concerns a married man who is shipwrecked on a deserted island. Over the passage of time, his wife, presuming he is dead, decides to move on with her life and takes another lover. Eventually, her missing spouse is rescued and makes his way home only to discover that his wife has remarried.

In My Favorite Wife, the roles are reversed and it is Ellen Arden (Dunne), who has been lost at sea. After seven years, Nick (Grant) has become romantically involved with Bianca (Gail Patrick) and made her his wife. It is on the couple's honeymoon that Nick sees his long lost wife for the first time. Frantic and understandably baffled, he shuffles between his two spouses in a futile effort to prevent wife number two from meeting wife number one. As if the situation isn't confounding enough, Nick soon learns that his wife was not marooned on the island alone. There was one other survivor, a handsome bachelor named Stephen Burkett (Randolph Scott), who is actively courting Ellen.

The pairing of Grant and Dunne as the conflicted couple is particularly inspired in this version of the story. The duo worked on only three films together, but developed a friendship that endured for decades. Of her onscreen partner, Dunne wrote, "I appeared with many leading men. But working with Cary Grant was different from working with other actors - he was much more fun! I think we were a successful team because we enjoyed working together tremendously, and that pleasure must have shown through onto the screen."

Director: Garson Kanin
Producer: Leo McCarey
Screenplay: Sam Spewack, Bella Spewack (based on a story by Leo McCarey, Sam Spewack and Bella Spewack and a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson).
Cinematography: Rudolph Mate
Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase, Mark-Lee Kirk
Music: Roy Webb
Cast: Irene Dunne (Ellen Arden), Cary Grant (Nick Arden), Randolph Scott (Stephen Burkett), Gail Patrick (Bianca), Ann Shoemaker (Ma Arden), Scotty Beckett (Tim Arden), Mary Lou Harrington (Chinch Arden).
BW-89m. Closed captioning.

by Mary Anne Melear

My Favorite Wife

My Favorite Wife

Based on Lord Tennyson's poem, "Enoch Arden," My Favorite Wife (1940) once again pairs Irene Dunne and Cary Grant in a romantic farce. The two first appeared together in The Awful Truth (1937), a classic screwball comedy directed by Leo McCarey. Working with Sam and Bella Spewack on the original story, McCarey intended to direct My Favorite Wife, but prior to filming he was involved in a very serious car accident, forcing him to relinquish his directorial responsibilities. Instead, McCarey tapped screenwriter Garson Kanin to direct and the prominent scenarist rose to the occasion quite successfully. McCarey was able to produce the movie, enjoying continued involvement in his pet project, and along with the Spewacks, received Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay for their work. My Favorite Wife also received Oscar nominations for Best Score (Roy Webb) and Best Art Direction (Van Nest Polglase and Mark-Lee Kirk). The movie was one of six films based on Tennyson's poem. McCarey originally planned the film for Jean Arthur under the working title, Woman Overboard, but she was committed to other projects (she eventually made a film - Too Many Husbands (1940) - which had a similar plot). Other versions of "Enoch Arden" include D.W. Griffith's film of the same name, which premiered in 1911. Another version, Something's Got to Give, went into production in 1962 with Marilyn Monroe but was never completed since the actress dropped out during filming (it was her final film project). Shortly afterward, Doris Day and James Garner were cast in a remake entitled Move Over, Darling (1963). The original premise of "Enoch Arden" concerns a married man who is shipwrecked on a deserted island. Over the passage of time, his wife, presuming he is dead, decides to move on with her life and takes another lover. Eventually, her missing spouse is rescued and makes his way home only to discover that his wife has remarried. In My Favorite Wife, the roles are reversed and it is Ellen Arden (Dunne), who has been lost at sea. After seven years, Nick (Grant) has become romantically involved with Bianca (Gail Patrick) and made her his wife. It is on the couple's honeymoon that Nick sees his long lost wife for the first time. Frantic and understandably baffled, he shuffles between his two spouses in a futile effort to prevent wife number two from meeting wife number one. As if the situation isn't confounding enough, Nick soon learns that his wife was not marooned on the island alone. There was one other survivor, a handsome bachelor named Stephen Burkett (Randolph Scott), who is actively courting Ellen. The pairing of Grant and Dunne as the conflicted couple is particularly inspired in this version of the story. The duo worked on only three films together, but developed a friendship that endured for decades. Of her onscreen partner, Dunne wrote, "I appeared with many leading men. But working with Cary Grant was different from working with other actors - he was much more fun! I think we were a successful team because we enjoyed working together tremendously, and that pleasure must have shown through onto the screen." Director: Garson Kanin Producer: Leo McCarey Screenplay: Sam Spewack, Bella Spewack (based on a story by Leo McCarey, Sam Spewack and Bella Spewack and a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson). Cinematography: Rudolph Mate Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase, Mark-Lee Kirk Music: Roy WebbCast: Irene Dunne (Ellen Arden), Cary Grant (Nick Arden), Randolph Scott (Stephen Burkett), Gail Patrick (Bianca), Ann Shoemaker (Ma Arden), Scotty Beckett (Tim Arden), Mary Lou Harrington (Chinch Arden). BW-89m. Closed captioning. by Mary Anne Melear

Cary Grant: The Signature Collection


Five Cary Grant DVD Debuts from Warner Home Video

Warner Home Video (WHV) is proud to celebrate Cary Grant's centennial with the Signature Collection DVD debut of five films from Hollywood's acclaimed screen legend whose gallantry and courtly charm spanned an illustrious career of 76 films. This collection includes Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer, My Favorite Wife, Destination Tokyo and Night and Day. Each of the DVDs includes the extra bonus features

. "Grant was indeed Hollywood's quintessential leading man," says George Feltenstein, WHH's Senior Vice President Classic Catalog. "Equally comfortable at comedy or drama, his popularity is unwavering and is still the standard by which romantic, sophisticated leading men are judged."

Once told by an interviewer "Everybody would like to be Cary Grant," Grant is said to have replied: "So would I." Born Archibald Leach in Bristol, England, on January 18, 1904, Grant left school at 14 to join the Bob Pender Troupe of knockabout comedians touring the English provinces. In 1920, Grant first came to America when the troupe appeared on Broadway in Good Times.

In 1933, Mae West picked Grant for She Done Him Wrong and I'm No Angel and his movie career was off and running. In the late '30s, Grant became one of the first stars to work as a "free agent," making films for multiple studios including MGM, Columbia and RKO. In 1936, he first teamed with Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor for Sylvia Scarlett, the initial film to fully demonstrate Grant's inspired comic flair. Among the films that followed were The Awful Truth, Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, Topper, Philadelphia Story, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace and None but the Lonely Heart, for which he won an Oscar® nomination. In 1970, the actor was given a special Academy Award® for career achievement.

Notably, Grant appeared in four of Alfred Hitchcock's best films, including the romantic thrillers North by Northwes with Eva Marie Saint; Notorious opposite Ingrid Bergman; Suspicion opposite Joan Fontaine and To Catch A Thief with Grace Kelly. Seemingly growing more handsome and charming as he got older, Grant retained his star status into the 1960s, appearing in such box-office hits as Operation Petticoat and Charade. He retired from the screen in 1966, but spent the next twenty years in the public eye, as a board member for companies such as Faberge, MGM and Hollywood Park. Despite constant offers, Grant refused to return to the screen, although he did consent to a series of retrospective Q&A evenings across America with his beloved fans. He enjoyed the experiences immeasurably, as did the audiences. It was in Davenport, Iowa while rehearsing for one of these "in-person" events that Cary Grant suffered a sudden stroke and died on November 29, 1986.

The Films in Cary Grant: The Signature Collection

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Goodbye city life; hello Connecticut, with plenty of laugh stops along the way. This movie classic - named by AFI as one of America's 100 Funniest Movies - about the frustrations and joys of building and owning a home features Grant as a New York ad exec who's taken on the task of building a house from the ground up. Will he lose everything, including his sanity, or become a happy suburban homeowner? Myrna Loy, as his extremely patient wife and Melvyn Douglas join in the fun.

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House will have the following extra content:
· Two Radio Productions:
- October 10, 1949 LUX Radio Theatre Broadcast starring Grant and Irene Dunne
- June 9, 1950 Screen Directors Playhouse Broadcast starring Grant and (his then-wife) Betsy Drake
· "The House of Tomorrow" Classic M-G-M Tex Avery Cartoon
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer - 1947 Academy Award® winner for Best Original Screenplay (by Sidney Sheldon), the film stars Cary Grant with Myrna Loy and a teen-aged Shirley Temple. In this very entertaining romantic comedy, Grant plays Richard Nugent, a bachelor minding his own business who finds a love-sick girl (Shirley Temple) asleep on his couch. The older sister of the teen is a Judge (Myrna Loy), and she "sentences" Nugent to go out with the bobby-soxer until she is no longer infatuated.

The extra features included on the DVD are:
· June 13, 1949 LUX Radio theatre Radio Production starring Grant and Temple
· "Little Tinker" Classic Tex Avery M-G-M cartoon
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

My Favorite Wife - Grant skillfully plays the romantic hunk and the comedic buffoon in this movie about marital mix-ups. Nick Arden (Grant) is on his way to the honeymoon suite with his new bride (Gail Patrick) when he runs into the wife (Irene Dunne) who was lost at sea and presumed dead seven years ago. The marriage knots have to be untied as the real Mrs. Arden steps up to claim her husband in this quirky romance filled with high jinks and big laughs.

My Favorite Wife will contain the following bonus content:
· Vintage M-G-M Robert Benchley short subject "Home Movies"
· December 7, 1949 Screen Director¿s Playhouse Radio Production starring Grant and Dunne
· Theatrical Trailer

Destination Tokyo - Grant is a military hero in this action-filled war drama. As Captain Cassidy, Grant pilots the U.S. submarine Copperfin through the dangerous waters of the enemy's front yard. Delmer Daves makes his directorial debut with this film that critics say remains "a classic war drama." This is the only military drama Grant made during World War II.

Destination Tokyo will contain these bonus features:
· Warner Bros. WWII short: "Gem of the Ocean"
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

Night And Day - Appearing in his first Technicolor motion picture, Grant portrays Cole Porter, the legendary, sophisticated songwriter whose life was marked by triumph and tragedy. He's joined by a superb cast including Alexis Smith, Jane Wyman, Eve Arden and Monty Woolley as himself. The film contains more than 20 of Porter's songs which have been enjoyed by many generations over the years. One of the film's most famous moments is Mary Martin re-creating her Broadway performance of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," the show-stopper that made her an overnight star. Even Cary gets into the act singing "You're the Top" with `40s chanteuse Ginny Simms. Interestingly, Hollywood is once again bringing Porter's life to the screen later this year, with Kevin Kline portraying the composer in Irwin Winkler's film "DeLovely."

The extra content in Night And Day will be:
· Vintage Warner Bros. Shorts: Desi Arnaz and His Orchestra and "Musical Movieland"
· Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in "The Big Snooze" a classic Looney Tunes cartoon
· Cole Porter Trailer Gallery

Each DVD will be presented in a format preserving the aspect ratio of its original theatrical exhibition and will include subtitles in English, French and Spanish. All except The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer are in Dual-Layer format.

To order Cary Grant: The Signature Collection, click here. Explore more Cary Grant titles here.

Cary Grant: The Signature Collection

Five Cary Grant DVD Debuts from Warner Home Video Warner Home Video (WHV) is proud to celebrate Cary Grant's centennial with the Signature Collection DVD debut of five films from Hollywood's acclaimed screen legend whose gallantry and courtly charm spanned an illustrious career of 76 films. This collection includes Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer, My Favorite Wife, Destination Tokyo and Night and Day. Each of the DVDs includes the extra bonus features. "Grant was indeed Hollywood's quintessential leading man," says George Feltenstein, WHH's Senior Vice President Classic Catalog. "Equally comfortable at comedy or drama, his popularity is unwavering and is still the standard by which romantic, sophisticated leading men are judged." Once told by an interviewer "Everybody would like to be Cary Grant," Grant is said to have replied: "So would I." Born Archibald Leach in Bristol, England, on January 18, 1904, Grant left school at 14 to join the Bob Pender Troupe of knockabout comedians touring the English provinces. In 1920, Grant first came to America when the troupe appeared on Broadway in Good Times. In 1933, Mae West picked Grant for She Done Him Wrong and I'm No Angel and his movie career was off and running. In the late '30s, Grant became one of the first stars to work as a "free agent," making films for multiple studios including MGM, Columbia and RKO. In 1936, he first teamed with Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor for Sylvia Scarlett, the initial film to fully demonstrate Grant's inspired comic flair. Among the films that followed were The Awful Truth, Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, Topper, Philadelphia Story, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace and None but the Lonely Heart, for which he won an Oscar® nomination. In 1970, the actor was given a special Academy Award® for career achievement. Notably, Grant appeared in four of Alfred Hitchcock's best films, including the romantic thrillers North by Northwes with Eva Marie Saint; Notorious opposite Ingrid Bergman; Suspicion opposite Joan Fontaine and To Catch A Thief with Grace Kelly. Seemingly growing more handsome and charming as he got older, Grant retained his star status into the 1960s, appearing in such box-office hits as Operation Petticoat and Charade. He retired from the screen in 1966, but spent the next twenty years in the public eye, as a board member for companies such as Faberge, MGM and Hollywood Park. Despite constant offers, Grant refused to return to the screen, although he did consent to a series of retrospective Q&A evenings across America with his beloved fans. He enjoyed the experiences immeasurably, as did the audiences. It was in Davenport, Iowa while rehearsing for one of these "in-person" events that Cary Grant suffered a sudden stroke and died on November 29, 1986. The Films in Cary Grant: The Signature Collection Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Goodbye city life; hello Connecticut, with plenty of laugh stops along the way. This movie classic - named by AFI as one of America's 100 Funniest Movies - about the frustrations and joys of building and owning a home features Grant as a New York ad exec who's taken on the task of building a house from the ground up. Will he lose everything, including his sanity, or become a happy suburban homeowner? Myrna Loy, as his extremely patient wife and Melvyn Douglas join in the fun. Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House will have the following extra content: · Two Radio Productions: - October 10, 1949 LUX Radio Theatre Broadcast starring Grant and Irene Dunne - June 9, 1950 Screen Directors Playhouse Broadcast starring Grant and (his then-wife) Betsy Drake · "The House of Tomorrow" Classic M-G-M Tex Avery Cartoon · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer - 1947 Academy Award® winner for Best Original Screenplay (by Sidney Sheldon), the film stars Cary Grant with Myrna Loy and a teen-aged Shirley Temple. In this very entertaining romantic comedy, Grant plays Richard Nugent, a bachelor minding his own business who finds a love-sick girl (Shirley Temple) asleep on his couch. The older sister of the teen is a Judge (Myrna Loy), and she "sentences" Nugent to go out with the bobby-soxer until she is no longer infatuated. The extra features included on the DVD are: · June 13, 1949 LUX Radio theatre Radio Production starring Grant and Temple · "Little Tinker" Classic Tex Avery M-G-M cartoon · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer My Favorite Wife - Grant skillfully plays the romantic hunk and the comedic buffoon in this movie about marital mix-ups. Nick Arden (Grant) is on his way to the honeymoon suite with his new bride (Gail Patrick) when he runs into the wife (Irene Dunne) who was lost at sea and presumed dead seven years ago. The marriage knots have to be untied as the real Mrs. Arden steps up to claim her husband in this quirky romance filled with high jinks and big laughs. My Favorite Wife will contain the following bonus content: · Vintage M-G-M Robert Benchley short subject "Home Movies" · December 7, 1949 Screen Director¿s Playhouse Radio Production starring Grant and Dunne · Theatrical Trailer Destination Tokyo - Grant is a military hero in this action-filled war drama. As Captain Cassidy, Grant pilots the U.S. submarine Copperfin through the dangerous waters of the enemy's front yard. Delmer Daves makes his directorial debut with this film that critics say remains "a classic war drama." This is the only military drama Grant made during World War II. Destination Tokyo will contain these bonus features: · Warner Bros. WWII short: "Gem of the Ocean" · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer Night And Day - Appearing in his first Technicolor motion picture, Grant portrays Cole Porter, the legendary, sophisticated songwriter whose life was marked by triumph and tragedy. He's joined by a superb cast including Alexis Smith, Jane Wyman, Eve Arden and Monty Woolley as himself. The film contains more than 20 of Porter's songs which have been enjoyed by many generations over the years. One of the film's most famous moments is Mary Martin re-creating her Broadway performance of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," the show-stopper that made her an overnight star. Even Cary gets into the act singing "You're the Top" with `40s chanteuse Ginny Simms. Interestingly, Hollywood is once again bringing Porter's life to the screen later this year, with Kevin Kline portraying the composer in Irwin Winkler's film "DeLovely." The extra content in Night And Day will be: · Vintage Warner Bros. Shorts: Desi Arnaz and His Orchestra and "Musical Movieland" · Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in "The Big Snooze" a classic Looney Tunes cartoon · Cole Porter Trailer Gallery Each DVD will be presented in a format preserving the aspect ratio of its original theatrical exhibition and will include subtitles in English, French and Spanish. All except The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer are in Dual-Layer format. To order Cary Grant: The Signature Collection, click here. Explore more Cary Grant titles here.

Quotes

Who are you?
- Judge Walter Bryson
Well, your honor...
- Steve
Oh, he was on the island with her. He's not important to this case.
- Nick Arden
I'll decide what's important to the case. What island?
- Judge Walter Bryson
The island where my wife stayed for seven years, your honor.
- Nick Arden

Trivia

The movie was inspired by Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem, Enoch Arden. Although it is not credited onscreen, the writers gave tribute to it by calling the main characters "Arden".

Notes

Although the film was based on a story by Samuel and Bella Spewack and Leo McCarey, it was very loosely inspired by Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem Enoch Arden in which a man who has been lost at sea for several years returns home to find that his wife believed him dead and remarried. According to information contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, J. R. McDonough, Vice President of RKO, was warned by the PCA to tone down scenes referring to a sexual relationship between "Ann" and "Burkett," as well as the suggestion in the final scene in which "Nick" tries to share "Ellen's" bed before his marriage has been declared annulled. The suggestiveness was toned down in both instances. The film's premiere was held in Louisville, KY, the hometown of star Irene Dunne. The film was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Art Direction, Best Original Score, and Best Original Story. In December 1940, the story was presented on the Lux Radio Theatre starring Laurence Olivier and Rosalind Russell. According to modern sources, Garson Kanin stepped in to direct portions of the film after Leo McCarey was involved in a near-fatal car accident. The story was to be remade by Fox in the spring of 1962 under the title Something's Got to Give. That production starred Marilyn Monroe and Dean Martin and was directed by George Cukor. Monroe was fired from the film for her frequent absences, however, and died shortly thereafter. All of the footage from that production was subsequently shelved and a new production was made by Fox in 1963 under the title Move Over Darling, directed by Michael Gordon and starring James Garner, Doris Day and Polly Bergen (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70; F6.3323). Some footage of the Monroe version was included in a 1991 Fox Television Network documentary on her.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video September 27, 1989

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1940

Broadcast in USA over TBS (colorized version) March 8, 1989.

Released in USA on video.

Remade as "Move Over, Darling" (1963) directed by Michael Gordon.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1940

Released in United States on Video September 27, 1989 (colorized version)