June Bride


1h 37m 1948
June Bride

Brief Synopsis

Two bickering reporters turn a small-town wedding into a battleground.

Film Details

Also Known As
Feature for June
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Adaptation
Release Date
Nov 13, 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 30 Oct 1948
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Feature for June by Eileen Tighe, Sarah Lorimer and Graeme Lorimer (copyrighted 15 Aug 1944).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

When foreign correspondent Carey Jackson returns to New York, he learns that his newspaper's Vienna office is being closed and that he is out of a job. The magazine's managing editor, Carleton Towne, offers him a substitute job on Home Life , a women's magazine owned by the same company, but Carey is not interested until he discovers that he would be working for editor Linda Gilman, with whom he was once in love. When Carey breaks the news to Linda, however, she refuses to hire him because she is still angry at him for leaving her three years earlier. They agree to talk matters over at dinner, and later, Carey unsuccessfully tries to rekindle their romance. Linda finally agrees to hire Carey on the condition that he will not think of her as a woman. The next morning, Carey and Linda leave for the Brinker home in Crestville, Indiana, where they are to set up a feature on the wedding of Jeanne Brinker, the eldest daughter, to Bud Mitchell. Although the feature will run in June, the magazine's deadline dictates that the wedding take place in March, so Linda's staff follows Carey and Linda a few days later to modernize the Mckinley-era decor of the Brinker house and make over the Brinkers, as well. Linda wants Carey to write a simple story of young love, but Carey keeps looking for an "angle." He believes that he has found it when he talks to Barbara, the younger daughter, who is known as Boo. Boo reveals that she has always been in love with Bud, but when Jeanne's former boyfriend Jim, Bud's older brother, joined the Army, Jeanne, who cannot stand to be without a man, made a play for Bud and is now going to marry him. Carey suggests that they ask an officer whom he knows to order Jim home for the wedding, but then thinks better of it, knowing that Linda will fire him if the wedding does not take place. Boo, however, secretly telephones Carey's friend and arranges for Jim to come home. Meanwhile, Carey gets extremely drunk on Mr. Brinker's cider, and during a sleigh ride, reconciles with Linda. When Jim arrives, an astonished Carey tries to get rid of him, but unaware of Boo's manipulations, Linda intervenes. Once they are back together, Jim and Jeanne elope. Carey tries to convince Linda that she now has an even better story, but before he can tell her about Boo and Bud, she fires him and adds that their relationship is also finished. When Boo complains to Carey that Bud still thinks of her as a little girl, he advises her to have the magazine's dress designer, Paula Winthrop, fit one of Jeanne's dresses on her. Carey then pretends to be interested in Boo in order to make Bud jealous, and soon Bud proposes to Boo. Having written their story, Carey returns to New York. In the excitement of the new wedding, Linda does not notice his departure, and when she later reads his story, she understands that he always knew the truth about the two couples. After the June issue is mocked up, Linda gives Towne her notice and then announces that she plans to go after Carey, not realizing that he is sitting in Towne's office and has heard every word. The couple is reconciled when Linda offers to follow Carey to Europe, toting his suitcases.

Film Details

Also Known As
Feature for June
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Adaptation
Release Date
Nov 13, 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 30 Oct 1948
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Feature for June by Eileen Tighe, Sarah Lorimer and Graeme Lorimer (copyrighted 15 Aug 1944).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

June Bride


Women's magazine editor Bette Davis and former flame Robert Montgomery find love again in June Bride (1948). As a foreign correspondent recently returned from Europe, Montgomery is hired to be Davis' assistant and must accompany her to cover a story - a typical middle class wedding in Indiana. But complications arise when Montgomery discovers the bride's sister is in love with the groom, while the bride herself seems to prefer the groom's brother.

Of course everything works out on screen, but activities behind the scenes did not go nearly so smoothly. Nor was there much love lost between screen lovers Davis and Montgomery.

June Bride was an important film for Bette Davis. She was coming off the lackluster drama Winter Meeting (1948) and longed to make a romantic comedy. From the beginning Davis wanted a Warner Bros. player like Dennis Morgan or Jack Carson for her co-star in June Bride. But director Bretaigne Windust and producer Henry Blanke talked her into Montgomery, promising he had more clout as a co-star and would help sell the movie. Later Blanke would admit to other motives for casting Montgomery. Apparently they believed the mid-forties Montgomery would make Davis look younger. Unfortunately, most agree it did not work. After watching the rushes, Blanke realized the effect was actually the opposite -- Davis made Montgomery look younger.

Montgomery, it seems, heartily enjoyed showing Davis up. In his close ups, Davis contended, Montgomery added elements that did not exist in the original scene. He would react to things Davis never did in her close ups (which were filmed first) and in doing so invalidate her performance entirely. Montgomery also had more experience with comedy than Davis did and never let her forget it with comments like, "Bette, my dear, this is not the court of Queen Elizabeth and certainly not the castle of Lady Macbeth."

The rivalry didn't end there. June Bride was filmed during the very close election race between Truman and Dewey. Davis was a Truman supporter. Montgomery backed the Republican Dewey. In fact, in 1947, Montgomery actually headed the Hollywood Republican Committee to elect Dewey. Polls were on Montgomery's side, predicting a Dewey win, but apparently Davis took issue with his smug confidence about the election's outcome. One scene in June Bride was actually filmed two ways to allow for a victory by either side. But based on the polls, the Dewey version of the scene was left in the original release print. The line was, "How can I convert this McKinley stinker into a Dewey modern?" Three days after the picture opened, Truman pulled off an upset and a rerelease print with the Truman substitution was rushed into theaters. Davis, naturally, sent Montgomery a gloating telegram.

Despite off screen tensions, the resulting film was a modest success that ensured Davis a new, four picture contract in 1949 and made her the highest paid woman in the United States, with a salary of $10,285 a week.

Producer: Henry Blanke
Director: Bretaigne Windust
Screenplay: Ranald MacDougall, Eileen Tighe (based on a play by Graeme Lorimer)
Cinematography:
Editing: Owen Marks
Music: David Buttolph
Art Direction: Anton Grot
Cast: Bette Davis (Linda Gilman), Robert Montgomery (Carey Jackson), Fay Bainter (Paula Winthrop), Betty Lynn (Boo Brinker), Tom Tully (Mr. Brinker), Barbara Bates (Jeanne Brinker), Jerome Cowan (Carleton Towne).
BW-97m. Closed captioning.

by Stephanie Thames
June Bride

June Bride

Women's magazine editor Bette Davis and former flame Robert Montgomery find love again in June Bride (1948). As a foreign correspondent recently returned from Europe, Montgomery is hired to be Davis' assistant and must accompany her to cover a story - a typical middle class wedding in Indiana. But complications arise when Montgomery discovers the bride's sister is in love with the groom, while the bride herself seems to prefer the groom's brother. Of course everything works out on screen, but activities behind the scenes did not go nearly so smoothly. Nor was there much love lost between screen lovers Davis and Montgomery. June Bride was an important film for Bette Davis. She was coming off the lackluster drama Winter Meeting (1948) and longed to make a romantic comedy. From the beginning Davis wanted a Warner Bros. player like Dennis Morgan or Jack Carson for her co-star in June Bride. But director Bretaigne Windust and producer Henry Blanke talked her into Montgomery, promising he had more clout as a co-star and would help sell the movie. Later Blanke would admit to other motives for casting Montgomery. Apparently they believed the mid-forties Montgomery would make Davis look younger. Unfortunately, most agree it did not work. After watching the rushes, Blanke realized the effect was actually the opposite -- Davis made Montgomery look younger. Montgomery, it seems, heartily enjoyed showing Davis up. In his close ups, Davis contended, Montgomery added elements that did not exist in the original scene. He would react to things Davis never did in her close ups (which were filmed first) and in doing so invalidate her performance entirely. Montgomery also had more experience with comedy than Davis did and never let her forget it with comments like, "Bette, my dear, this is not the court of Queen Elizabeth and certainly not the castle of Lady Macbeth." The rivalry didn't end there. June Bride was filmed during the very close election race between Truman and Dewey. Davis was a Truman supporter. Montgomery backed the Republican Dewey. In fact, in 1947, Montgomery actually headed the Hollywood Republican Committee to elect Dewey. Polls were on Montgomery's side, predicting a Dewey win, but apparently Davis took issue with his smug confidence about the election's outcome. One scene in June Bride was actually filmed two ways to allow for a victory by either side. But based on the polls, the Dewey version of the scene was left in the original release print. The line was, "How can I convert this McKinley stinker into a Dewey modern?" Three days after the picture opened, Truman pulled off an upset and a rerelease print with the Truman substitution was rushed into theaters. Davis, naturally, sent Montgomery a gloating telegram. Despite off screen tensions, the resulting film was a modest success that ensured Davis a new, four picture contract in 1949 and made her the highest paid woman in the United States, with a salary of $10,285 a week. Producer: Henry Blanke Director: Bretaigne Windust Screenplay: Ranald MacDougall, Eileen Tighe (based on a play by Graeme Lorimer) Cinematography: Editing: Owen Marks Music: David Buttolph Art Direction: Anton Grot Cast: Bette Davis (Linda Gilman), Robert Montgomery (Carey Jackson), Fay Bainter (Paula Winthrop), Betty Lynn (Boo Brinker), Tom Tully (Mr. Brinker), Barbara Bates (Jeanne Brinker), Jerome Cowan (Carleton Towne). BW-97m. Closed captioning. by Stephanie Thames

Quotes

I don't want to miss Boo's wedding. I've missed so many of my own.
- Rosemary
How are you fixed for money?
- Carleton Towne
As usual, I'm un-loaded.
- Carey Jackson
Oh no, don't! ...Give up, that is. It's very interesting. Nobody makes love like that in Indiana.
- Boo Brinker
By the way, our date *is* off, isn't it? When I didn't hear from you for three years, I leaped to that conclusion. You heel.
- Linda Gilman
You're being charming, reasonable and very boyish. Unless you've changed, that means you're about to drink someone's blood. Probably mine.
- Linda Gilman

Trivia

Notes

The film's working title was Feature for June. A November 29, 1947 Los Angeles Times news item notes that Paramount had also considered producing a film based on Eileen Tighe and Graeme Lorimer's play. Tighe was the editor of House and Garden magazine. According to a December 10, 1954 Hollywood Reporter news item, Tighe planned to make the play, which was never produced, into a musical with music and lyrics by Richard Kayne. This film marked Debbie Reynold's film debut. June Bride was released during the 1948 presidential elections, and according to modern sources, one line, delivered by Mary Wickes, was shot once as "How can I convert this McKinley stinker into a Dewey modern?" and a second time with "Truman" substituted for Dewey. The "Dewey" line was in the released version and when Harry S. Truman was unexpectedly elected president rather than Thomas E. Dewey, a revised reel was rushed to theaters. Bette Davis reprised her role in a August 29, 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring James Stewart. Irene Dunne and Fred MacMurray starred in a second Lux radio adaptation on December 28, 1953, and Marguerite Chapman and Jerome Thor starred in a Lux Video Theatre telecast of the story on August 25, 1955.