Ginger and Fred


2h 6m 1986
Ginger and Fred

Brief Synopsis

A song-and-dance team are reunited for a nostalgic television special.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fellini's Ginger and Fred, Ginger & Fred, Ginger et Fred
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Foreign
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Fr3 Films Productions; Rai-Tv Channel 1; Roissy Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Recorded Releasing Company; Sacis
Location
Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Synopsis

At one time, Amelia Bonetti and Pippo Botticella were a famous song and dance team who gained success by recreating the dance routines of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Eventually, they gave up on becoming the Fred and Ginger of Italy and broke up the act. Many years have gone by and Amelia has had little success with her other occupations, so she is thrilled to land a guest-starring role on a TV variety show and immediately calls Pippo to appear with her. But Amelia finds that Pippo has lost his resemblance to Astaire over the years.

Cast

Marcello Mastroianni

Pippo Botticella--

Franco Fabrizi

Television Program Host

Giulietta Masina

Amelia Bonetti--

Frederick Von Ledenburg

Admiral Aulenti

Augusto Poderosi

Transvestite

Martin Maria Blau

Assistant Producer

Jacques Henry Lartigue

Brother Gerolamo--Flying Priest

Toto Mignone

Toto

Ezio Marano

Writer--Intellectual

Antoine Saint Jean

Bandaged Man--Absentee

Frederich Von Thun

Kidnapped Industrialist

Antonio Ivorio

Television Inspector

Barbara Scoppa

Pretty Journalist

Elisabetta Flumeri

Journalist

Salvatore Billa

Gable Double

Ginestra Spinola

Clairvoyant--Mother Of Ghost

Stefania Marini

Continuity Girl

Francesco Casale

Mobster

Gianfranco Alpestre

Kidnapped Lawyer

Filippo Ascione

Pianist

Elena Cantarone

Nurse

Cosima Chiusoli

Unfrocked Priest'S Fiancee

Claudio Ciocca

Television Cameraman

Sergio Ciulli

Clairvoyant'S Son--Son Of Ghost

Roberto Desandro

2nd Hotel Porter

Vittorio Debisogno

Television Director

Fabrizio Fontana

Honorable Tartina

Laurentina Guidotti

Production Secretary

Giorgio Iovine

1st Hotel Porter

Danica La Loggia

Kidnapped Mother

Isabelle Therese Laporte

Television Program Hostess

Luigi Leoni

Mayor

Luciano Lombardo

Spretato--Unfrocked Priest

Mariele Loreley

Journalist

Elena Magoia

Literary Critic

Franco Marino

Impresario Nanetti

Mario Misul

Editor

Jurghen Morhofer

Rock Guitarist

Pippo Negri

Underpants Inventor

Antoinetta Patriarca

Mrs Silvestri

Nando Pucci Negri

On-Set Assistant Director

Luigi Rossi

Super-Decorated Man

Franco Trevisi

Carabinieri Captain

Patty Vailati

Patty The Secretary

Narcisio Vicario

Television President

Hermann Weiskopf

Professor Kare Rulph Noiburg

Crew

Fabio Ancillai

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Fausto Ancillai

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Gianni Arduini

Assistant Director

Filippo Ascione

Assistant Director

Nino Baragli

Editor

Daniela Barbiani

Assistant Director

Dario Bellini

Titles

Eugenio Cappuccio

Assistant Director

O G Caramazza

Other

Adriano Carboni

Makeup

Rino Carboni

Makeup (Chief)

Furio Castelli

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Stefano Cecchini

Graphics

Gianfranco Coduti

Associate Producer

Massimo Dearossi

Makeup

Tonino Delli Colli

Director Of Photography

Adonella Derossi

Makeup

Fernanda Derossi

Makeup

Ugo Derossi

Editor

Danilo Donati

Costumes

Federico Fellini

From Story

Federico Fellini

Screenwriter

Dante Ferretti

Art Direction

Dante Ferretti

Set Design

Giovanni Fiore Coltellacci

Camera Operator

Renato Francola

Makeup

Alberto Grimaldi

Producer

Miro Grisanti

Titles

Ennio Guarnieri

Director Of Photography

Tonino Guerra

Screenwriter

Tonino Guerra

From Story

Raymond Leplont

Associate Producer

Tullio Lullo

Production Supervisor

Mario Maldesi

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Roberto Mannoni

Associate Producer

Aldo Marchiori

Camera Operator

Sergio Marcotulli

Sound Recording Mixer

Franco Marino

Production Supervisor

Walter Massi

Associate Producer

Ruggero Mastroianni

Editor

Gino Millozza

Other

Fabio Palmisano

Synchronization

Tullio Pinelli

Screenwriter

Nicola Piovani

Musical Comment

Adriano Pischiutta

Special Effects

Nazzareno Plana

Set Design

Tommaso Quattrini

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Massimo Rinchiusi

Synchronization

Fernando Rossi

Production Supervisor

Donato Salone

Music Consultant

Luigi Sergainni

Set Dresser

Giacomo Setaccioli

Graphics

Viero Spadoni

Production Supervisor

Carlo Tafani

Camera Operator

Alfredo Tibori

Makeup

Italo Tomassi

Set Dresser

Tony Ventura

Choreography

Anke Zindler

Assistant Director

Videos

Movie Clip

Ginger And Fred (1986) -- (Movie Clip) Are We In Such Bad Shape? Escaping the inescapably Federico Fellini-esque backstage scene of the low-rent Roman TV nostalgia special, the principals (the director’s wife Giullietta Masina as Amelia, a.k.a. Ginger and Marcello Mastroianni as Pippo, a.k.a. “Fred”) with their old friend Toto (Mignoli), assume their costumes and continue their reacquaintance, in Ginger And Fred, 1986.
Ginger And Fred (1986) -- (Movie Clip) Keep Rome Clean Opening in routine circumstances at a train station in Rome, Giulietta Masina in her last performance directed by her husband, arriving to a modest reception, as Federico Fellini’s authorship emerges, especially in pork-oriented advertising, in the well-received Ginger And Fred, 1986, also starring Marcello Mastroianni, Barbara Scoppa the reporter in the van.
Ginger And Fred (1986) -- (Movie Clip) I Don't See The Resemblance On the first evening in the modest Rome hotel, Amelia (Giulietta Masina, the director’s wife, stage name “Ginger,”) remains in good spirits, awaiting the corny TV special and her still-absent partner “Fred,” Martin Maria Blau the disinterested assistant director, in Federico Fellini’s Ginger And Fred, 1986.
Ginger And Fred (1986) -- (Movie Clip) It's Like A Landing Strip Still not discouraged that her old partner hasn’t turned up for the TV variety show in Rome, Amelia, (a.k.a. “Ginger,” Giulietta Masina, wife of the director Federico Fellini) manages to be charitable when she discovers he (Marcello Mastroianni, his first scene, as Pippo, a.k.a. “Fred”) is her noisy neighbor, in Ginger And Fred, 1986.

Trailer

Film Details

Also Known As
Fellini's Ginger and Fred, Ginger & Fred, Ginger et Fred
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Foreign
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Fr3 Films Productions; Rai-Tv Channel 1; Roissy Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Recorded Releasing Company; Sacis
Location
Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Articles

Ginger and Fred - GINGER AND FRED


Ginger and Fred (1986) was one of the last films made by cinema's unchallenged master of grotesque caricature, Federico Fellini. After a long career of brilliantly marching out spiritual, economic, and social charlatans for our scrutiny, it made sense that Fellini would finally get around to taking aim at that towering repository of all-encompassing phoniness - television. Paradoxically enough - and after years of begging from advertisers - he decided to shoot Ginger and Fred shortly after helming his first TV commercial! (Pretentious cineastes can at least be thankful that he rejected an offer to direct a Boy George video around the same time.)

Ginger and Fred tells the story of Amelia (Giulietta Masina, Fellini's real-life wife) and Pippo (Marcello Mastroianni) two aging, second-tier hoofers who used to go by the stage names of "Fred and Ginger." Years past their primes, and having completely lost contact with each other, they're invited to participate in a televised variety show that will include such "acts" as a priest who has married and will kiss his new bride on the air, a troupe of dancing midgets, a transvestite who offers sexual favors to horny prison inmates, and an inventor who eats his new-and-improved edible panties off of a model. (Any resemblance to the Fox network is purely coincidental...if not visionary.)

Amelia and Pippo try to rehearse, but it becomes clear that Pippo is an alcoholic who has only shown up for the quick money. Amelia grows less and less enthusiastic as the freak show nears; both Fred and Ginger seem unsure of whether they want to participate. The two will become nothing more than cogs in a bizarre, belittling ritual, exactly the sort of thing that Fellini could orchestrate in high style. Still, he knew how to tap very real human emotions amidst the foolishness.

In yet another paradox tied to this production, Ginger and Fred began its life as a concept for a TV movie. It was originally meant to be part of an anthology film in which Masina would play six different roles and be directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, Franco Zeffirelli, and Fellini himself. For his installment, Fellini created a character named Ginger, a sensitive former vaudeville dancer who became a grandmother and the owner of a small business. When Mastroianni agreed to play Ginger's over-the-hill partner, Fellini decided to turn the story into a feature film that would brutally dissect modern television. The final version is filled with ridiculous commercials, most of them for sausages, the implication being that the human participants in the TV show are nothing more than disposable products, pop cultural flotsam.

Fellini stated that he originally wanted to recapture "the essence of those old variety shows" that he saw when he was young, and that the story was to take place in "this labyrinth, enchanted palace of TV." This enchantment would not hold, of course. There were simply too many ripe targets waiting to be zapped.

Needless to say, the tube has grown even more Fellini-esque in recent years. Fellini was forever tapping into a more imposing zeitgeist than most audience members recognized on their own. During the filming of Ginger and Fred, critic Richard Corliss looked back on the director's storied career and noted: "What may once have looked like outrageous cartoons of sensuality and sacrilege have become, in retrospect, previews of a moral system spun wildly off its axis...his pictures celebrate what they criticize; they amount to a cautionary blueprint for survival in the Atomic Age."

In I, Fellini by Charlotte Chandler (Cooper Square Press), the director shared his own views on Ginger and Fred: "Our little picture was about people who worshiped Rogers and Astaire. The title Ginger and Fred was meant as a compliment, and I just could not believe it when I was told that Ginger Rogers had reacted with anger and was trying to stop the film from being shown. The damages being asked for were more than the cost of making the film. I never believed she was the one responsible. She must have listened to other people who said the film ridiculed her. Some critics even said I was making fun of Rogers and Astaire. I never mock what I do. I see what is funny about my subjects, but I never make fun of them. I laugh with my characters, not at them....The person who was really hurt was Giulietta, because she had so identified with Ginger, and the movie was really made because of Giulietta...In the Italy of the thirties, Ginger and Fred had comforted us, especially those of us who lived in the provinces. In the world of fascism, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers showed us that another life was possible, at least in America, that land of unimaginable freedom and opportunity."

Directed by: Federico Fellini
Screenplay: Federico Fellini, Tonino Guerra, and Tullio Pinelli
Producer: Heinz Bibo and Alberto Grimaldi Cinematography: Tonino Delli Colli and Ennio Guarnieri Editing: Nino Baragli
Music: Nicola Piovani
Production Design: Dante Ferretti
Costume Design: Danilo Donati
Principal Cast: Giulietta Masina (Amelia/Ginger), Marcello Mastroianni (Pippo/Fred), Franco Fabrizi (show host), Frederick Ledebur (Admiral), Augusto Poderosi (transvestite), Martin Maria Blau (producer’s assistant), Toto Mignone (Toto), Jacques Henri Lartigue (Flying Priest).
C-128m.

by Paul Tatara

Ginger And Fred - Ginger And Fred

Ginger and Fred - GINGER AND FRED

Ginger and Fred (1986) was one of the last films made by cinema's unchallenged master of grotesque caricature, Federico Fellini. After a long career of brilliantly marching out spiritual, economic, and social charlatans for our scrutiny, it made sense that Fellini would finally get around to taking aim at that towering repository of all-encompassing phoniness - television. Paradoxically enough - and after years of begging from advertisers - he decided to shoot Ginger and Fred shortly after helming his first TV commercial! (Pretentious cineastes can at least be thankful that he rejected an offer to direct a Boy George video around the same time.) Ginger and Fred tells the story of Amelia (Giulietta Masina, Fellini's real-life wife) and Pippo (Marcello Mastroianni) two aging, second-tier hoofers who used to go by the stage names of "Fred and Ginger." Years past their primes, and having completely lost contact with each other, they're invited to participate in a televised variety show that will include such "acts" as a priest who has married and will kiss his new bride on the air, a troupe of dancing midgets, a transvestite who offers sexual favors to horny prison inmates, and an inventor who eats his new-and-improved edible panties off of a model. (Any resemblance to the Fox network is purely coincidental...if not visionary.) Amelia and Pippo try to rehearse, but it becomes clear that Pippo is an alcoholic who has only shown up for the quick money. Amelia grows less and less enthusiastic as the freak show nears; both Fred and Ginger seem unsure of whether they want to participate. The two will become nothing more than cogs in a bizarre, belittling ritual, exactly the sort of thing that Fellini could orchestrate in high style. Still, he knew how to tap very real human emotions amidst the foolishness. In yet another paradox tied to this production, Ginger and Fred began its life as a concept for a TV movie. It was originally meant to be part of an anthology film in which Masina would play six different roles and be directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, Franco Zeffirelli, and Fellini himself. For his installment, Fellini created a character named Ginger, a sensitive former vaudeville dancer who became a grandmother and the owner of a small business. When Mastroianni agreed to play Ginger's over-the-hill partner, Fellini decided to turn the story into a feature film that would brutally dissect modern television. The final version is filled with ridiculous commercials, most of them for sausages, the implication being that the human participants in the TV show are nothing more than disposable products, pop cultural flotsam. Fellini stated that he originally wanted to recapture "the essence of those old variety shows" that he saw when he was young, and that the story was to take place in "this labyrinth, enchanted palace of TV." This enchantment would not hold, of course. There were simply too many ripe targets waiting to be zapped. Needless to say, the tube has grown even more Fellini-esque in recent years. Fellini was forever tapping into a more imposing zeitgeist than most audience members recognized on their own. During the filming of Ginger and Fred, critic Richard Corliss looked back on the director's storied career and noted: "What may once have looked like outrageous cartoons of sensuality and sacrilege have become, in retrospect, previews of a moral system spun wildly off its axis...his pictures celebrate what they criticize; they amount to a cautionary blueprint for survival in the Atomic Age." In I, Fellini by Charlotte Chandler (Cooper Square Press), the director shared his own views on Ginger and Fred: "Our little picture was about people who worshiped Rogers and Astaire. The title Ginger and Fred was meant as a compliment, and I just could not believe it when I was told that Ginger Rogers had reacted with anger and was trying to stop the film from being shown. The damages being asked for were more than the cost of making the film. I never believed she was the one responsible. She must have listened to other people who said the film ridiculed her. Some critics even said I was making fun of Rogers and Astaire. I never mock what I do. I see what is funny about my subjects, but I never make fun of them. I laugh with my characters, not at them....The person who was really hurt was Giulietta, because she had so identified with Ginger, and the movie was really made because of Giulietta...In the Italy of the thirties, Ginger and Fred had comforted us, especially those of us who lived in the provinces. In the world of fascism, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers showed us that another life was possible, at least in America, that land of unimaginable freedom and opportunity." Directed by: Federico Fellini Screenplay: Federico Fellini, Tonino Guerra, and Tullio Pinelli Producer: Heinz Bibo and Alberto Grimaldi Cinematography: Tonino Delli Colli and Ennio Guarnieri Editing: Nino Baragli Music: Nicola Piovani Production Design: Dante Ferretti Costume Design: Danilo Donati Principal Cast: Giulietta Masina (Amelia/Ginger), Marcello Mastroianni (Pippo/Fred), Franco Fabrizi (show host), Frederick Ledebur (Admiral), Augusto Poderosi (transvestite), Martin Maria Blau (producer’s assistant), Toto Mignone (Toto), Jacques Henri Lartigue (Flying Priest). C-128m. by Paul Tatara

Ginger and Fred - Marcello Mastroianni & Giulietta Masina in Federico Fellini's GINGER AND FRED on DVD


For anyone who loves old movies, the names Ginger and Fred automatically mean Rogers and Astaire, the most fabulously gifted dance team in Hollywood history. But for admirers of Federico Fellini, the names also mean Amelia Bonetti and Pippo Botticella, an Italian dance team that's a lot less gifted, to put it mildly. They're the heroes of Fellini's comedy-drama Ginger and Fred, released in 1986 and available on DVD from Warner Bros. Home Video.

Ginger and Fred are the stage names used by Amelia and Pippo in their act, where they mimic the American originals as well as they can, like the music-hall equivalent of a tribute band. They made a living this way in their younger days, but that was long ago, and at the beginning of Fellini's movie they're about to see each other for the first time more than twenty years. The occasion is a TV show focusing on imitators and look-alikes, so they'll be sharing the stage with everyone from "Bette Davis" to "Marcel Proust."

Amelia's reunion with Pippo was arranged after her agent talked her into accepting the TV show's invitation to appear on its Christmastime program, and much of the film's poignant humor comes from the fact that neither of them is sure this is a good idea. They clicked with audiences in bygone decades, but it's far from certain they can remember their old moves, to say nothing of gracefully pulling them off.

The only definite thing is that however much they once looked like Rogers and Astaire, the resemblance has faded to zero. Amelia has become a well-preserved old lady, and Pippo isn't even well preserved. Seeing him rehearse is like watching a coronary itching to happen.

Although three writers are credited with the screenplay, including Fellini himself, Ginger and Fred doesn't have much of a plot. It's more of a mood piece than a conventional comedy-drama, relying on the charisma of its two excellent stars - Giuletta Masina as Amelia and Marcello Mastroianni as Pippo - and on the Felliniesque atmosphere, dreamlike and surreal, that underlies every scene. What story there is centers on Amelia's arrival in Rome, her first glimpses of Pippo in less-than-prime condition, his attempts to rekindle their old magic, and finally their rehearsals and the long-awaited show.

The movie's centerpiece is a lengthy scene where the show's assorted guests mingle in a large room at the TV station, producing zany confusion as they vie for attention and praise. Pippo tries valiantly to be the life of the party-his specialty is smutty little rhymes-but there's too much competition for the old guy to make much of a splash. In addition to its lively visual interest, this sequence is very prescient about the future of television; it's not much of a leap to see the likes of American Idol and The Anna Nicole Show being born in this strange assemblage of mostly untalented show-offs.

Given the film's dim view of television, it's mildly ironic that it was made for TV, with Radiotelevisione Italiana as one of the producers. Fellini always appreciated irony, though, and he was always flexible when an interesting challenge came along. He started his career as a neorealist, with pictures like the 1954 road movie La Strada and the great 1960 epic La Dolce Vita, then turned to the world of his own imagination in such '60s masterpieces as and the short Toby Dammit. He also made well-received documentaries in the late '60s and early '70s.

But after the nostalgic 1973 hit Amarcord, which was based on his "invented memories" of childhood, he appeared to lose touch with the richest parts of his talent. Of his late movies, from Casanova in 1976 to The Voice of the Moon in 1990, Ginger and Fred certainly has the widest appeal.

It may also be the most personal. Fellini must have realized that pictures like And the Ship Sails On and City of Women didn't have his former zing, and he may have identified with over-the-hill Pippo more than he cared to let on, carrying this into the movie itself. Mastroianni played his alter ego in , after all; Masina was Fellini's wife off the screen just as she's Pippo's partner in the film; and Fred could almost be a nickname for Federico.

Mastroianni provides the movie's most impressive performance, giving Pippo a subdued melancholy and all-but-faded allure that makes him the story's most well-rounded character. Masina has a natural charm that served her well in many Fellini films, and it remains strong here. Perhaps too strong, since Amelia is so effortlessly appealing that it's sometimes hard to remember she's a has-been. Then again, the real Ginger Rogers didn't see it that way-she found it so offensive that she sued the producers and distributors for false advertising and violating her privacy!

Fellini always saw the world - especially the Italian world - as a blend of boisterous circus, darkly amusing freak show, and wellspring of strange, exotic visions dredged up from memory and the unconscious. He explored these most exuberantly in introspective movies like and Amarcord, and he returns to them with more restraint in Ginger and Fred, helped by the sideshow ambience he finds everywhere from the TV studio to the nighttime Roman streets.

He gets first-rate assistance from his cinematographers, Tonino Delli Colli and Ennio Guarnieri, and from composer Nicola Piovani, whose music uncannily recalls the Nino Rota scores that enhance so many Fellini classics. Ginger and Fred isn't a great movie, but in its own quiet way it's Felliniesque to its bones. It's good have a well-produced DVD edition, although more extras than just the theatrical trailer would have been nice.

For more information about Ginger and Fred, visit Warner Video. To order Ginger and Fred, go to TCM Shopping.

by Mikita Brottman and David Sterritt

Ginger and Fred - Marcello Mastroianni & Giulietta Masina in Federico Fellini's GINGER AND FRED on DVD

For anyone who loves old movies, the names Ginger and Fred automatically mean Rogers and Astaire, the most fabulously gifted dance team in Hollywood history. But for admirers of Federico Fellini, the names also mean Amelia Bonetti and Pippo Botticella, an Italian dance team that's a lot less gifted, to put it mildly. They're the heroes of Fellini's comedy-drama Ginger and Fred, released in 1986 and available on DVD from Warner Bros. Home Video. Ginger and Fred are the stage names used by Amelia and Pippo in their act, where they mimic the American originals as well as they can, like the music-hall equivalent of a tribute band. They made a living this way in their younger days, but that was long ago, and at the beginning of Fellini's movie they're about to see each other for the first time more than twenty years. The occasion is a TV show focusing on imitators and look-alikes, so they'll be sharing the stage with everyone from "Bette Davis" to "Marcel Proust." Amelia's reunion with Pippo was arranged after her agent talked her into accepting the TV show's invitation to appear on its Christmastime program, and much of the film's poignant humor comes from the fact that neither of them is sure this is a good idea. They clicked with audiences in bygone decades, but it's far from certain they can remember their old moves, to say nothing of gracefully pulling them off. The only definite thing is that however much they once looked like Rogers and Astaire, the resemblance has faded to zero. Amelia has become a well-preserved old lady, and Pippo isn't even well preserved. Seeing him rehearse is like watching a coronary itching to happen. Although three writers are credited with the screenplay, including Fellini himself, Ginger and Fred doesn't have much of a plot. It's more of a mood piece than a conventional comedy-drama, relying on the charisma of its two excellent stars - Giuletta Masina as Amelia and Marcello Mastroianni as Pippo - and on the Felliniesque atmosphere, dreamlike and surreal, that underlies every scene. What story there is centers on Amelia's arrival in Rome, her first glimpses of Pippo in less-than-prime condition, his attempts to rekindle their old magic, and finally their rehearsals and the long-awaited show. The movie's centerpiece is a lengthy scene where the show's assorted guests mingle in a large room at the TV station, producing zany confusion as they vie for attention and praise. Pippo tries valiantly to be the life of the party-his specialty is smutty little rhymes-but there's too much competition for the old guy to make much of a splash. In addition to its lively visual interest, this sequence is very prescient about the future of television; it's not much of a leap to see the likes of American Idol and The Anna Nicole Show being born in this strange assemblage of mostly untalented show-offs. Given the film's dim view of television, it's mildly ironic that it was made for TV, with Radiotelevisione Italiana as one of the producers. Fellini always appreciated irony, though, and he was always flexible when an interesting challenge came along. He started his career as a neorealist, with pictures like the 1954 road movie La Strada and the great 1960 epic La Dolce Vita, then turned to the world of his own imagination in such '60s masterpieces as 8½ and the short Toby Dammit. He also made well-received documentaries in the late '60s and early '70s. But after the nostalgic 1973 hit Amarcord, which was based on his "invented memories" of childhood, he appeared to lose touch with the richest parts of his talent. Of his late movies, from Casanova in 1976 to The Voice of the Moon in 1990, Ginger and Fred certainly has the widest appeal. It may also be the most personal. Fellini must have realized that pictures like And the Ship Sails On and City of Women didn't have his former zing, and he may have identified with over-the-hill Pippo more than he cared to let on, carrying this into the movie itself. Mastroianni played his alter ego in 8½, after all; Masina was Fellini's wife off the screen just as she's Pippo's partner in the film; and Fred could almost be a nickname for Federico. Mastroianni provides the movie's most impressive performance, giving Pippo a subdued melancholy and all-but-faded allure that makes him the story's most well-rounded character. Masina has a natural charm that served her well in many Fellini films, and it remains strong here. Perhaps too strong, since Amelia is so effortlessly appealing that it's sometimes hard to remember she's a has-been. Then again, the real Ginger Rogers didn't see it that way-she found it so offensive that she sued the producers and distributors for false advertising and violating her privacy! Fellini always saw the world - especially the Italian world - as a blend of boisterous circus, darkly amusing freak show, and wellspring of strange, exotic visions dredged up from memory and the unconscious. He explored these most exuberantly in introspective movies like 8½ and Amarcord, and he returns to them with more restraint in Ginger and Fred, helped by the sideshow ambience he finds everywhere from the TV studio to the nighttime Roman streets. He gets first-rate assistance from his cinematographers, Tonino Delli Colli and Ennio Guarnieri, and from composer Nicola Piovani, whose music uncannily recalls the Nino Rota scores that enhance so many Fellini classics. Ginger and Fred isn't a great movie, but in its own quiet way it's Felliniesque to its bones. It's good have a well-produced DVD edition, although more extras than just the theatrical trailer would have been nice. For more information about Ginger and Fred, visit Warner Video. To order Ginger and Fred, go to TCM Shopping. by Mikita Brottman and David Sterritt

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

The Country of Italy

Released in United States Spring March 28, 1986

Released in United States on Video September 1991

Released in United States Spring March 28, 1986

Released in United States on Video September 1991

Released in United States January 13, 1986 (World Premiere January 13, 1986.)

Released in United States January 13, 1986