Living on Velvet


1h 20m 1935
Living on Velvet

Brief Synopsis

A guilt-ridden pilot finds a new outlook on life when he falls for a society girl.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Mar 2, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Productions Corp.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

After pilot Terry Parker survives a plane crash that kills his sister, father and mother, he believes he is living on borrowed time. Unable to take anything seriously, he continually gets into trouble. His friend, Walter Pritcham, known as Gibraltar for his steady nature, rescues him from one debacle and brings him to a party. Terry catches the eye of Amy Prentiss and they fall in love at first sight. When Terry realizes that she is Gibraltar's girl, he tries to step aside, but Gibraltar, caring only for Amy's happiness, reunites them. Despite the misgivings of Amy's aunt Martha, she and Terry marry and Gibraltar gives them a house in the country on Long Island, arranging to buy some worthless stock for a high price in order to loan them money without hurting Terry's pride. Terry is unable to get a job until he hits on the idea of flying commuters into New York. Amy, however, believes that Terry will never act responsibly and leaves him. Although Gibralter advises her to return to Terry, Amy feels that he is better off without her. Then Terry crashes his car and Amy and Gibraltar rush to his side. Terry and Amy realize how much they love each other and vow never to part.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Mar 2, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Productions Corp.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Articles

Living On Velvet


The trailer for Living On Velvet (1935) proclaims "With the consent of Miss Kay Francis, we are privileged to show you pages from her diary", wherein "Kay" extolls how excited she is to return to work after "four glorious months in Europe". The vacation part was true, but Francis's real diary was a bit more florid: shooting on this picture was delayed because Francis was on bedrest while recovering from an abortion after juggling at least five lovers on her European tour, including Maurice Chevalier. But this movie - about a devil-may-care pilot (George Brent) in love with his best friend's girl (Francis) -- was the kind of ultra-continental women's picture Francis could do with one hand tied behind her back, with lots of sitting in chic cafes and wearing glamorous gowns -- and outrageous hats -- like no one else could. (Even co-star Brent's taste for practical jokes couldn't get Francis to flub her lines, even if one "dunking" scene took four hours to shoot because of his shenanigans.) Critics thought the plot was silly but praised Francis, whose life kept on being very exciting in 1935, with lots more to write about in her diary.
Living On Velvet

Living On Velvet

The trailer for Living On Velvet (1935) proclaims "With the consent of Miss Kay Francis, we are privileged to show you pages from her diary", wherein "Kay" extolls how excited she is to return to work after "four glorious months in Europe". The vacation part was true, but Francis's real diary was a bit more florid: shooting on this picture was delayed because Francis was on bedrest while recovering from an abortion after juggling at least five lovers on her European tour, including Maurice Chevalier. But this movie - about a devil-may-care pilot (George Brent) in love with his best friend's girl (Francis) -- was the kind of ultra-continental women's picture Francis could do with one hand tied behind her back, with lots of sitting in chic cafes and wearing glamorous gowns -- and outrageous hats -- like no one else could. (Even co-star Brent's taste for practical jokes couldn't get Francis to flub her lines, even if one "dunking" scene took four hours to shoot because of his shenanigans.) Critics thought the plot was silly but praised Francis, whose life kept on being very exciting in 1935, with lots more to write about in her diary.

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Variety notes that although portions of the film were supposed to take place in Patchogue on Long Island, the mountains seen in the background are not indigenous to Long Island. According to the copyright synopsis, the film originally was to end with George Brent's character dying in the automobile crash. According to modern sources, Warren William's character was to win the girl after Brent's character's death, but as William's contract was about to end, Jack Warner awarded the romance to Brent's character. Modern sources add the following credits: Assistant Director Lew Borzage, Lee Katz and John Gates. According to modern credits, a working title was Tragedy with Music.