Anchors Aweigh


2h 23m 1945
Anchors Aweigh

Brief Synopsis

A pair of sailors on leave try to help a movie extra become a singing star.

Photos & Videos

Anchors Aweigh - Publicity Photos - Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly
Anchors Aweigh - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Anchors Aweigh - Complete Shooting Script

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jul 1945
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the short story "You Can't Fool a Marine" by Natalie Marcin in This Week (14 Feb 1943).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 23m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
12,542ft

Synopsis

After eight months at sea, sailors Clarence Doolittle and Joseph Brady are granted a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, California. Joe, an incorrigible philanderer, plans to see one of his sweethearts while on leave, and later offers the shy and bookish Clarence advice on how to meet women. Clarence and Joe set out to find their shore leave romances but their plans are soon thwarted by a police sergeant, who demands that they help him with an unusual situation involving a young boy named Donald Martin. The police sergeant explains that Donald has run away from home to join the Navy and refuses to tell the police where he lives. Joe and Clarence easily win Donald's trust and agree to escort him home, where he lives with his widowed aunt, Susan Abbott. While Joe is eager to avoid any further involvement with the young boy, Clarence falls in love with Susan and promises to return the following day. When Joe and Clarence return to Susan's, they meet Bertram Kraler, a man Susan hopes will introduce her to the famous maestro José Iturbi. As Susan dresses for her date, Joe, convinced that Bertram is a new suitor who will only get in the way of Clarence's romantic pursuit of Susan, scares Bertram away by suggesting that Susan is a notorious Navy sweetheart. When Susan learns what Joe has done, she breaks down in tears and believes that her chances at breaking into show business are doomed. Joe tries to comfort Susan but only makes matters worse for himself when he tells her that Clarence and Iturbi are good friends and that he can arrange an audition for her. With her faith in Joe and Clarence restored, Susan takes them to a Mexican restaurant and sings a song for them. While Joe dances with Susan, Clarence meets a friendly waitress, whom he nicknames "Brooklyn," after their hometown. Realizing that he must honor Joe's promise to Susan for an audition with Iturbi, Clarence tries unsuccessfully to meet with Iturbi at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. Meanwhile, Joe, who has become quite fond of Donald and Susan, tells Donald's classmates a story about his experience in a mythical kingdom populated by animals: In the kingdom, Joe discovers that the animals that live there are sad because their mouse king has prohibited them from singing. Determined to help the animals, Joe visits their unhappy king and shows him the beauty of song and dance. Joe's story concludes with the king repealing his edict and allowing the animals to sing. As a new romance develops between Clarence and Brooklyn, Joe falls in love with Susan. One day, Susan has a chance encounter with Iturbi and discovers that Joe and Clarence have been deceiving her and do not really know Iturbi. Feeling embarrassed and betrayed, Susan breaks down in tears. Iturbi, however, understands her situation and arranges a screen test for her. The test is a great success, and Iturbi soon presents Susan at one of his shows. Before returning to his ship, Joe makes amends with Susan, and Clarence and Brooklyn embrace.

Cast

Frank Sinatra

Clarence Doolittle

Kathryn Grayson

Susan Abbott

Gene Kelly

Joseph Brady

José Iturbi

Himself

Dean Stockwell

Donald Martin

Pamela Britton

Girl from Brooklyn

"rags" Ragland

Police sergeant

Billy Gilbert

Café manager

Henry O'neill

Admiral Hammond

Carlos Ramirez

Carlos

Edgar Kennedy

Police captain

Grady Sutton

Bertram Kraler

Leon Ames

Admiral's aide

Sharon Mcmanus

Little girl beggar

James Flavin

Radio cop

James Burke

Studio cop

Henry Armetta

Hamburger man

Chester Clute

Iturbi's assistant

Alex Callam

Commander

Billy Nelson

Sailor

Frank Mitchell

Sailor

Allen Ray

Sailor

Harry Barris

Sailor

John James

Sailor

Jerry Shane

Sailor

John Cannon

Sailor

Eddie Hall

Sailor

Sam Finn

Sailor

Wally Cassell

Sailor

Douglas Cowan

Sailor

Henry Daniell

Sailor

Phil Hanna

Sailor

William "bill" Phillips

Sailor

Tom Trout

Sailor

Arthur Walsh

Sailor

Esther Michelson

Hamburger woman

Lottie Harrison

Telephone operator

Frank Marlowe

Shore patrol officer

Lee Phelps

Cop

Robert E. O'connor

Cop

Forbes Murray

Man on street

William Forrest

Movie director

Ray Teal

Assistant movie director

Milton Kibbee

Bartender

Virginia Engels

Woman with cop

Don Garner

Soldier

Garry Owen

Soldier

Steve Brodie

Soldier

Paul Regan

Marine

Joe Haworth

Marine

Marjorie Wood

U.S.O. mother

Jane Green

U.S.O. mother

Claire Whitney

U.S.O. mother

Netta Packer

U.S.O. mother

Naomi Scher

Waitress

Romere Darling

Waitress

Connie Starr

Waitress

Connie Montoya

Waitress

Gloria Hope

Receptionist

Peggy Maley

Lana Turner double

Lester Dorr

Assistant director

Jack Luden

Assistant director

Bob Homans

Old cop

Sondra Rodgers

Iturbi's secretary

Milton Parsons

Bearded man

Renie Riano

Studio waitress

Jack Harvey

Admiral extra

Joe Bernard

Old doorman

Paulita Arviza

Cashier in café

Elinor Troy

Tall woman

Mimi Aguglia

Old lady

Ben Heiderman

Mexican cook

Joe Dominguez

Man in café

Nolan Leary

Milkman

Charles Coleman

Butler

Ralph Dunn

Cop at the Hollywood Bowl

Frank Darien

Janitor at the Hollywood Bowl

J. Lockard Martin

Giant

James Carlisle

Test director

Ruth Lee

Kindergarten teacher

Thomas Quinn

Bea Nigro

Crew

Ray Austin

Composer

Vera Bloom

Composer

Charles Boyle

Director of Photography

Johannes Brahms

Composer

Earl Brent

Kathryn Grayson's vocal Arrangements

Earl Brent

Composer

Sammy Cahn

Composer

Jesus Castillón

Composer

Mark Davis

Matte paintings Camera

Jack Dawn

Makeup created by

Kay Dean

Associate

Peter P. Decker

Music mixer

B. G. Desylva

Composer

Jack Donohue

Dance Director

Randall Duell

Art Director

Adrienne Fazan

Film Editor

Oscar Felix

Composer

James Z. Flaster

Unit mixer and re-rec Effects mixer

Chet Forrest

Composer

Rudolf Friml

Composer

Jacob Gade

Composer

Cedric Gibbons

Art Director

Irving Glassberg

2nd Camera

Henri Jamblam Herpin

Composer

Irene

Costumes

Henri Jaffa

Associate (Color)

Natalie Kalmus

Technicolor Color Consultant

Gene Kelly

Dance seq created by

Standish J. Lambert

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Isobel Lennart

Screenwriter

Lamberto Leyva

Composer

Franz Liszt

Composer

R. Lovell

Composer

Jay Marchant

Production Manager

Freddy Martin

Composer

M. J. Mclaughlin

Music mixer

Joseph Meyer

Composer

Alfred Hart Miles

Composer

Warren Newcombe

Matte paintings

Joe Pasternak

Producer

Richard Pefferle

Associate (Sets)

Robert Planck

Director of Photography

Carol Raven

Composer

George Rhein

Assistant Director

Thomas Richards

Film Editor

Matos Rodriguez

Composer

Harold Rome

Composer

Gioacchino Antonio Rossini

Composer

William J. Saracino

Music mixer

Douglas Shearer

Recording Director

Robert W. Shirley

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Newell Sparks

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Herbert Stahlberg

Music mixer

William Steinkamp

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Michael Steinore

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Cesare Sterbini

Composer

Georgie Stoll

Music Director

Axel Stordahl

Orchestration

Jule Styne

Composer

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Composer

John A. Williams

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Edwin B. Willis

Set Decoration

Bobby Worth

Composer

Bob Wright

Composer

Charles A. Zimmerman

Composer

Photo Collections

Anchors Aweigh - Publicity Photos - Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly
Here is a group of publicity stills from Anchors Aweigh (1945), featuring Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Anchors Aweigh - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a number of photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Anchors Aweigh (1945). Look for stars Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, and Kathryn Grayson, director George Sidney, and even MGM cartoon stars Tom & Jerry!
Anchors Aweigh - Complete Shooting Script
Here is a copy of the complete shooting script (158 pages) for MGM's Anchors Aweigh (1945), written by Isobel Lennart. This a version dated 6/8/44 - the different colored pages indicate revisions made during the scripting process.
Anchors Aweigh - reissue Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for Anchors Aweigh (1945). Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater. This pressbook was prepared for the 1955 reissue.

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jul 1945
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the short story "You Can't Fool a Marine" by Natalie Marcin in This Week (14 Feb 1943).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 23m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
12,542ft

Award Wins

Best Music Original Dramatic Score

1946

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1945
Gene Kelly

Best Cinematography

1945
Robert Planck

Best Picture

1945

Best Song

1945

Articles

Anchors Aweigh - Anchors Aweigh


Anchors Aweigh (1945), a quintessential Forties song and dance extravaganza about two sailors on leave in Hollywood, remains the penultimate example of the MGM confectionery machine at its peak. The seamless team chemistry of Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly proved so sensational that the duo would be paired in two subsequent (and legendary) Metro releases, Take Me Out to the Ballgame and, most notably, On the Town (both 1949). Their reel camaraderie paralleled their real lifetime friendship, an enthusiasm evident in every frame they share together. For Sinatra, a devout movie buff, co-starring at MGM was a dream come true - and this picture, showing him as a girl-shy gob in love, firmly cemented him as a member of the studio's more-stars-than-there-are-in-Heaven club. Importantly, it was the singer's first appearance in Technicolor - and the sight of Ol' Blue Eyes'...well, blue eyes brought untold millions of "oohs," "ahhs," and sighs of "Frankie!" from the ever growing female public, many of whom returned to their respective Bijous two, five and even ten times to see the movie.

Aside from the spectacular Technicolor (whose radiant bright hues turned Southern California into a kaleidoscopic paradise), Anchors Aweigh was expertly helmed by George Sidney, beginning his feature film tenure after apprenticing in the studio's shorts department. Sinatra, never one to forget a key player in his career, heartily approved when Sidney was slated to direct Pal Joey in 1957.

Of course Gene Kelly was no slouch either - nor was female lead Kathryn Grayson or the cute little urchin playing her kid brother, Dean Stockwell. Kelly's imaginative dances, resulting in the masterful live action/animation set piece, wherein the star cuts a veritable rug with MGM's cartoon luminary Jerry the Mouse, is probably the most famous sequence in the picture.

In The Films of Gene Kelly by Tony Thomas, Kelly recalls the origin of this dance which took two months to complete: "Stanley Donen and I sat around for a couple of days trying to think of something and after one long period of silence Stanley suggested, "How about doing a dance with a cartoon?" This was it. The MGM brass didn't think it could be done, but [producer Joe] Pasternak went to bat for us and got a budget of $100,000, to do it as an independent production, warning us that it likely would not appear in the movie. Stanley and I went to Walt Disney, to get his advice and possibly hire some of his men to work for us. But this wasn't possible because the Disney studio was so busy it couldn't accept any extra work. Disney was himself experimenting with live action and animation at that time although he had nothing as difficult in mind as what we hoped to do. But he gave us his blessings, and the fact that Disney considered the idea feasible helped us persuade the MGM cartoon department to do the job. I get all the credit for this, but it would have been impossible for me without Stanley, he worked with the cameraman and called the shots in all these intricate timings and movements. It wasn't easy for the cameraman - he was being asked to photograph something that wasn't there."

Indeed, the Jerry the Mouse/Gene Kelly dance is a unique novelty but it is probably the magnificent Jule Styne/Sammy Cahn songs (including "What Makes the Sunset" and "I Begged Her") that the flick's legions of fans take closest to heart. A top favorite is "I Fall in Love Too Easily"; as sung by a lonely Sinatra in the empty Hollywood Bowl, the ballad, in its elegant simplicity, remains one of the movie musical's greatest moments.

Director: George Sidney
Producer: Joe Pasternak
Screenplay: Isobel Lennart, Natalie Marcin
Cinematography: Robert Planck, Charles Boyle
Editor: Adrienne Fazan
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Randall Duell
Music: George Stoll, Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn
Cast: Frank Sinatra (Clarence Doolittle), Kathryn Grayson (Susan Abbott), Gene Kelly (Joseph Brady), Jose Iturbi (Himself), Dean Stockwell (Donald Martin), Rags Ragland (Police Sergeant).
C-140m. Close captioning.

by Mel Neuhaus
Anchors Aweigh  - Anchors Aweigh

Anchors Aweigh - Anchors Aweigh

Anchors Aweigh (1945), a quintessential Forties song and dance extravaganza about two sailors on leave in Hollywood, remains the penultimate example of the MGM confectionery machine at its peak. The seamless team chemistry of Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly proved so sensational that the duo would be paired in two subsequent (and legendary) Metro releases, Take Me Out to the Ballgame and, most notably, On the Town (both 1949). Their reel camaraderie paralleled their real lifetime friendship, an enthusiasm evident in every frame they share together. For Sinatra, a devout movie buff, co-starring at MGM was a dream come true - and this picture, showing him as a girl-shy gob in love, firmly cemented him as a member of the studio's more-stars-than-there-are-in-Heaven club. Importantly, it was the singer's first appearance in Technicolor - and the sight of Ol' Blue Eyes'...well, blue eyes brought untold millions of "oohs," "ahhs," and sighs of "Frankie!" from the ever growing female public, many of whom returned to their respective Bijous two, five and even ten times to see the movie. Aside from the spectacular Technicolor (whose radiant bright hues turned Southern California into a kaleidoscopic paradise), Anchors Aweigh was expertly helmed by George Sidney, beginning his feature film tenure after apprenticing in the studio's shorts department. Sinatra, never one to forget a key player in his career, heartily approved when Sidney was slated to direct Pal Joey in 1957. Of course Gene Kelly was no slouch either - nor was female lead Kathryn Grayson or the cute little urchin playing her kid brother, Dean Stockwell. Kelly's imaginative dances, resulting in the masterful live action/animation set piece, wherein the star cuts a veritable rug with MGM's cartoon luminary Jerry the Mouse, is probably the most famous sequence in the picture. In The Films of Gene Kelly by Tony Thomas, Kelly recalls the origin of this dance which took two months to complete: "Stanley Donen and I sat around for a couple of days trying to think of something and after one long period of silence Stanley suggested, "How about doing a dance with a cartoon?" This was it. The MGM brass didn't think it could be done, but [producer Joe] Pasternak went to bat for us and got a budget of $100,000, to do it as an independent production, warning us that it likely would not appear in the movie. Stanley and I went to Walt Disney, to get his advice and possibly hire some of his men to work for us. But this wasn't possible because the Disney studio was so busy it couldn't accept any extra work. Disney was himself experimenting with live action and animation at that time although he had nothing as difficult in mind as what we hoped to do. But he gave us his blessings, and the fact that Disney considered the idea feasible helped us persuade the MGM cartoon department to do the job. I get all the credit for this, but it would have been impossible for me without Stanley, he worked with the cameraman and called the shots in all these intricate timings and movements. It wasn't easy for the cameraman - he was being asked to photograph something that wasn't there." Indeed, the Jerry the Mouse/Gene Kelly dance is a unique novelty but it is probably the magnificent Jule Styne/Sammy Cahn songs (including "What Makes the Sunset" and "I Begged Her") that the flick's legions of fans take closest to heart. A top favorite is "I Fall in Love Too Easily"; as sung by a lonely Sinatra in the empty Hollywood Bowl, the ballad, in its elegant simplicity, remains one of the movie musical's greatest moments. Director: George Sidney Producer: Joe Pasternak Screenplay: Isobel Lennart, Natalie Marcin Cinematography: Robert Planck, Charles Boyle Editor: Adrienne Fazan Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Randall Duell Music: George Stoll, Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn Cast: Frank Sinatra (Clarence Doolittle), Kathryn Grayson (Susan Abbott), Gene Kelly (Joseph Brady), Jose Iturbi (Himself), Dean Stockwell (Donald Martin), Rags Ragland (Police Sergeant). C-140m. Close captioning. by Mel Neuhaus

Quotes

Trivia

For the most famous sequence in the film, Mickey Mouse was originally meant to be 'Kelly, Gene' 's dance partner. However, when Walt Disney refused to have his most famous character appear in an MGM film, Kelly turned to MGM's own animation studio and used Jerry Mouse of Tom and Jerry fame.

When the dance sequence with 'Kelly, Gene' and Jerry the Mouse was screened for MGM executives, someone noticed that although Gene Kelly's reflection shone on the floor during his dancing, Jerry's did not. So all the animators who worked on the sequence had to be rehired to go back in and draw Jerry's reflection on the floor as he was dancing.

Notes

Anchors Aweigh marked Frank Sinatra's first film under his new contract with M-G-M, following his departure from RKO, and his motion picture dancing debut. Gene Kelly began his service in the Navy a short time after the film was completed. An October 1943 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that Eleanor Powell was originally set for the female lead, and that M-G-M later cast Marilyn Maxwell in the role. The same news item indicates that Jackie "Butch" Jenkins, Nancy Walker and Ben Blue were originally set for roles. According to an April 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item, Ann Miller was considered for a dancing role opposite Kelly. Various news items in Hollywood Reporter in 1943 and 1944 indicate that Jack Haley, Keye Luke and Phil Silvers were considered for roles, but they did not appear in the released film. Although their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed, contemporary news items and Hollywood Reporter production charts include the following actors in the cast: Jack Lambert, Ella Logan, Dean Murphy, January Gilbreath and Peter Whitehead. A December 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that Sara Berner "completed recording" on the film. Berner, a cartoon voice specialist, May have provided the voice of "Jerry the Mouse." Modern sources note that Sinatra's role was originally intended for actor Eddie Bracken, and that Elizabeth Taylor was considered for a starring role.
       The cartoon sequence in which Kelly enters a mythical kingdom is frequently shown in documentaries about film and film musicals. The experimental technique of combining live action with animation had been used since the 1920s but had not been used extensively until the 1945 Disney film The Three Caballeros (see below). The cartoon mouse featured in the Anchors Away sequence is "Jerry the Mouse" of the Tom and Jerry cartoon series. According to a December 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item, M-G-M formed a new cartoon unit of animators, writers and other specialists to handle the extra footage for the live-action and animation sequence. Modern sources note that Fred Quimby was one of the animators of the cartoon sequence, and that M-G-M had initially sought permission to use "Mickey Mouse" for the part of the mouse king. Disney, however, refused to allow "Mickey" to be used in the film. A biography of choreographer/director Stanley Donen indicates that Donen spent one year working on the "Jerry the Mouse" sequence, and that the picture was held from release until the sequence was completed.
       Hollywood Reporter production charts and a July 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item lists Thomas Richards as the film's editor, but only Adrienne Fazan is credited onscreen. In a 1947 interview, composer Jule Styne stated that the song "The Charm of You," which Sinatra sang to Pamela Britton in the film, was originally intended to be sung to Kathryn Grayson. The five songs composed by Styne and Sammy Cahn were written especially for the film. In addition to the songs listed above in Songs, the film contains an unidentified tango composed by Carmen Dragon, according to the Variety review. A 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that twenty-three musical numbers had been completed for the film. Musical numbers that were considered or recorded and that were not used in the final film include: "It Could Only Happen in Brooklyn," a duet planned for Sinatra and Britton, composed by Styne and Cahn; "I'll Be Waiting Here," a song planned for Britton, composed by Earl Brent; "Caro nome," from the opera Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi, and a selection from the opera Lucia di Lammermoor by Gaetano Donizetti, to be sung by Grayson; "Another Kiss," composed by B. G. DeSylva and Ted Grouya, to be sung by Sinatra and Grayson; "Loveland" by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane; "The Kid That I've Never Seen" by Herman Ruby, Bert Kalmar, Al Jolson and Harry Akst; "My Follies Girl," by Jolson and Akst; and "As I Recall," "When I Get to Town," "Love and I Went Waltzing" and "Don't Be Subtle, Don't Be Coy" by Styne and Cahn.
       Some filming took place on location at the Hollywood Bowl, in Los Angeles, CA CA, and at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, MD. Sinatra, Grayson and Kelly recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story, which aired on December 29, 1947. A Hollywood Reporter news item in January 1946 indicates that M-G-M planned a sequel to Anchors Aweigh entitled All Ashore, written by Columbia Pictures producer Robert Taplinger. The sequel was to reteam Sinatra, Kelly and Grayson under the direction of George Sidney. Although All Ashore was shelved in September 1946, a film bearing the same title, and with a similar story, was released by Columbia in 1952. The 1952 film was directed by Richard Quine and starred Mickey Rooney and Dick Haymes.
       Anchors Aweigh received an Academy Award for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, and was nominated for awards for Best Picture, Best Actor (Gene Kelly), Best Cinematography and Best Song ("I Fall in Love Too Easily").