Millard Kaufman


Screenwriter

About

Also Known As
Sally Stubblefield
Birth Place
Baltimore, Maryland
Born
March 12, 1917
Died
March 14, 2009
Cause of Death
Heart Failure

Biography

An Oscar®-nominated screenwriter and co-creator of the cartoon character Mr. Magoo, Millard Kaufman was a former newspaperman who began writing for films after distinguished service in the Marines during World War II. His Oscar® nominations came for two MGM films, Take the High Ground! (1953), a drama about Army basic training starring Richard Widmark; and Bad Day at Black Rock ...

Biography

An Oscar®-nominated screenwriter and co-creator of the cartoon character Mr. Magoo, Millard Kaufman was a former newspaperman who began writing for films after distinguished service in the Marines during World War II. His Oscar® nominations came for two MGM films, Take the High Ground! (1953), a drama about Army basic training starring Richard Widmark; and Bad Day at Black Rock (1955), a superb Western suspense film starring Spencer Tracy as a one-armed veteran facing mysterious enemies in a small desert town.

Kaufman wrote the screenplay for Ragtime Bear (1949), the first animated short to feature Mr. Magoo, a character modeled in part on Kaufman's uncle. "My uncle had no problem with his eyes," he once said. "He simply interpreted everything that came his way in his own particular manner."

Kaufman was born in 1917 in Baltimore, Md., and before moving to MGM had a couple of screenplays produced at minor-league studios. At United Artists, he fronted for blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo on the film noir classic Gun Crazy (1950). He later insisted that the Writers Guild take his name off the credits and show Trumbo as the true author.

Kaufman spent a decade at MGM, where he was known as a reliable script doctor in addition to writing his own screenplays. Highlights at that studio included Raintree County (1957), with Kaufman serving as associate producer in addition to condensing Ross Lockridge, Jr.'s epic novel into a comprehensible and often moving screenplay; and Never So Few (1959), an adaptation of the Tom T. Chamales novel about O.S.S. operatives in World War II Burma, starring Frank Sinatra, Gina Lollobrigida and Steve McQueen.

After leaving MGM Kaufman wrote screenplays for Allied Artists' Convicts Four (1962), a prison drama starring Ben Gazzara; and Living Free (1972), Columbia Pictures' sequel to Born Free (1966) which focuses on the cubs of the original film's lioness. He also did some television work and, at age 90, published his first novel, A Bowl of Cherries. A second novel, Misadventure, was published posthumously in March 2010.

Kaufman, who was married and had three children, died in 2009. One of his screenplays, The Big Blow, is scheduled to be released as a film in 2011.

by Roger Fristoe

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Johnny Got His Gun (1971)
Director
Convicts 4 (1962)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

Enola Gay (1980)
Screenplay
The Nativity (1978)
Screenplay
The Klansman (1974)
Screenwriter
Living Free (1972)
Screenwriter
Johnny Got His Gun (1971)
Screenwriter
The Horsemen (1971)
Screenwriter
The Fixer (1968)
Screenwriter
Hawaii (1966)
Screenwriter
The Sandpiper (1965)
Screenwriter
The War Lord (1965)
Screenwriter
Lonely Are the Brave (1962)
Screenwriter
Convicts 4 (1962)
Screenwriter
The Last Sunset (1961)
Screenwriter
Exodus (1960)
Screenwriter
Spartacus (1960)
Screenwriter
Never So Few (1959)
Screenwriter
Terror in a Texas Town (1958)
Original Screenplay
Cowboy (1958)
Screenwriter
The Green-Eyed Blonde (1957)
Screenwriter
Raintree County (1957)
Screenwriter
The Green-Eyed Blonde (1957)
Writer
The Boss (1956)
Original story and Screenplay
Bad Day at Black Rock (1955)
Screenwriter
Roman Holiday (1953)
Story
Take the High Ground! (1953)
Story and Screenplay
Aladdin and His Lamp (1952)
Screenwriter
My Man and I (1952)
Contract Writer
He Ran All the Way (1951)
Screenwriter
The Prowler (1951)
Screenwriter
Unknown World (1951)
Original Screenplay
Emergency Wedding (1950)
Story
Gun Crazy (1950)
Screenwriter
Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945)
Screenwriter
Jealousy (1945)
Based on an Original idea by
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944)
Screenwriter
A Guy Named Joe (1944)
Screenwriter
Tender Comrade (1944)
Writer
The Remarkable Andrew (1942)
Screenwriter
I Married a Witch (1942)
Contract Writer
Accent on Love (1941)
Original Story
You Belong to Me (1941)
Based on the story by
Curtain Call (1940)
Screenwriter
Kitty Foyle (1940)
Screenwriter
A Bill of Divorcement (1940)
Screenwriter
We Who Are Young (1940)
Original Screenplay
Half a Sinner (1940)
Original Story
The Lone Wolf Strikes (1940)
Story
Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence (1939)
Screenwriter
Career (1939)
Screenwriter
Sorority House (1939)
Screenwriter
The Flying Irishman (1939)
Screenwriter
Five Came Back (1939)
Screenwriter
Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence (1939)
Original Story
The Kid from Kokomo (1939)
Original Story
A Man to Remember (1938)
Screenwriter
Fugitives for a Night (1938)
Screenwriter
Paradise for Three (1938)
Contr to Screenplay const
Everybody Sing (1938)
Contr to dial
That Man's Here Again (1937)
Contr to trmt
The Devil's Playground (1937)
Screenwriter
Thoroughbreds Don't Cry (1937)
Script polishing
Love Begins at Twenty (1936)
Screenwriter
Road Gang (1936)
Screenwriter
Tugboat Princess (1936)
Story

Producer (Feature Film)

The Green-Eyed Blonde (1957)
Associate Producer
Raintree County (1957)
Associate Producer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Tender Comrade (1943) - Kind Of Red And Uncomfortable On their first night in their new shared house, WWII defense factory workers Jo (Ginger Rogers) and just-married Doris (Kim Hunter) share fairly intimate info, in Tender Comrade, 1943, featuring future blacklist targets Hunter, Mady Christians, writer Dalton Trumbo and director Edward Dmytryk.
Tender Comrade (1943) - You Made Me Love You Speedy path to a flashback getting top-billed Ginger Rogers, as Southern California wartime factory gal Jo, into a sexy outfit (with three, maybe four-inch heels in the back yard!), recalling the proposal by now-deployed Chris (Robert Ryan), in the home-front drama Tender Comrade. 1943.
Tender Comrade (1943) - You Have Very Small Ears Kind of a moment for Ruth Hussey (as Barbara, married to deployed Pete, who might well be a heel), with WWII California factory worker housemates, Kim Hunter, Patricia Collinge and Ginger Rogers (as newlywed Doris, Helen and Jo), about dating other men, in Tender Comrade. 1943.
Raintree County (1957) - Do I Shock You? Professor Stiles (Nigel Patrick) on a pre-graduation picnic, tells John (Montgomery Clift), Nell (Eva Marie Saint) and the class of their Indiana town's mythic roots, early in Raintree County, 1957, from the celebrated novel by Ross Lockridge Jr.
Raintree County (1957) - There's Mommy Now! In Indiana during the war, John Shawnessy (Montgomery Clift) and son Jim (Mickey Maga) greet mother Susanna (Elizabeth Taylor) returned from Indianapolis, who shortly suffers another breakdown, in the Civil War saga Raintree County, 1957.
Raintree County (1957) - These Damn Dolls Tumult in Indiana on the night of Lincoln's election, as John (Montgomery Clift) insults Garwood (Rod Taylor) then tries to rescue his troubled wife Susanna (Elizabeth Taylor) in Raintree County, 1957.
Raintree County (1957) - Better Put On My Pants The 4th of July footrace, with the professor (Nigel Patrick) backing John (Montgomery Clift) who is drunk for the first time, against "Flash" Perkins (Lee Marvin), Nell (Eva Marie Saint) and Susanna (Elizabeth Taylor) spectating, in Raintree County, 1957.
Raintree County (1957) - There Are No Neutrals! John (Montgomery Clift) chases down his erstwhile girlfriend Nell (Eva Marie Saint) in the Indiana woods and, as they try to reconcile, meets vigilantes seeking the professor, in the Civil War epic Raintree County, 1957.
Raintree County (1957) - Opening Credits After the Overture, with Nat "King" Cole singing the theme, the opening credits for director Edward Dmytryk's sprawling Civil War epic Raintree County, 1957, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift and Eva Marie Saint.
Gun Crazy (1949) - You Can Sure Scare Him Off Fresh from their bank robbery in western gear, Annie (Peggy Cummins) and Bart (John Dall) switch to a nerd look for their escape from Hampton, in Joseph H. Lewis' Gun Crazy, 1949.
Never So Few (1959) - Opening, In The Hills Of North Burma Handy cast I-D shots are featured in the opening to John Sturges' World War Two Burma adventure Never So Few, 1959, starring Frank Sinatra, Gina Lollobrigida, Peter Lawford and Steve McQueen.
Never So Few (1959) - Hiawatha Not something you see every day, Dean Jones (as "Norby") picking a fight with Charles Bronson (as Navajo "Danforth"), officiated by Frank Sinatra ("Reynolds") and directed by John Sturges, in the WWII Burmese jungle in Never So Few, 1959.

Trailer

Five Came Back - (Original Trailer) Lucille Ball plays the ultimate game of Survivor after a jungle plane crash in the thriller Five Came Back (1939).
Hawaii - (Original Trailer) Missionairies to the Hawaiian Islands fight nature, disease and their own passions in Hawaii (1966) starring Julie Andrews, Max von Sydow, and Richard Harris.
Fugitives for a Night - (Original Trailer) A faded star is suspected of killing a studio executive in Fugitives for a Night (1938) written by Dalton Trumbo (Roman Holiday, Spartacus).
Exodus - (Textless trailer) Paul Newman and Eva Marie Saint lead an all-star cast in Otto Preminger's epic about the formation of the modern state of Israel, Exodus (1960).
Last Sunset, The - (Original Trailer) A sheriff (Rock Hudson) finds the outlaw (Kirk Douglas) he's hunting leading a cattle drive and decides to help him before arresting him in Robert Aldrich's The Last Sunset (1961).
War Lord, The - (Original Trailer) Charlton Heston is a medieval knight who exercises his right to sleep with another man's bride on their wedding night in The War Lord (1965).
Road Gang - (Original Trailer) A reporter (Donald Woods) exposes corruption on a southern chain gang in Road Gang (1936).
Guy Named Joe, A -- (Re-issue Trailer) A downed World War II pilot (Spencer Tracy) becomes the guardian angel for his successor (Van Johnson) in love and war in A Guy Named Joe (1943).
Sandpiper, The - (Original Trailer) An Episcopal priest (Richard Burton) falls for a bohemian artist (Elizabeth Taylor) living in Big Sur in The Sandpiper (1965).
We Who Are Young - (Original Trailer) A man violates company policy by getting married in We Who Are Young (1940) starring Lana Turner.
Kid From Kokomo, The - (Original Trailer) A fight manager (Pat O'Brien) decides his client needs a family for publicity purposes in The Kid from Kokomo (1939).
Never So Few - (Black-and-white Trailer) A U.S. military troop takes command of a band of Burmese guerillas during World War II in Never So Few (1959).

Bibliography