Lawrence Kasdan


Director, Screenwriter
Lawrence Kasdan

About

Also Known As
Lawrence Edward Kasdan
Birth Place
Miami Beach, Florida, USA
Born
January 14, 1949

Biography

Responsible for writing some of the biggest blockbusters in Hollywood history, screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan was also an accomplished director who specialized in helming poignant ensemble character dramas. Kasdan first broke into Hollywood with the script for "The Bodyguard" (1992), which he sold in 1976, only to watch it languish in so-called development hell for almost two decades. Mean...

Family & Companions

Meg Kasdan
Wife
Screenwriter. Married on November 28, 1971; born c. 1948; met while they were both students at the University of Michigan; co-wrote "Grand Canyon" (1991).

Biography

Responsible for writing some of the biggest blockbusters in Hollywood history, screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan was also an accomplished director who specialized in helming poignant ensemble character dramas. Kasdan first broke into Hollywood with the script for "The Bodyguard" (1992), which he sold in 1976, only to watch it languish in so-called development hell for almost two decades. Meanwhile, his script for "Continental Divide" (1981) captured the attention of Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, the latter of whom hired Kasdan to write "Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back" (1980), widely considered to be the best film in the franchise. He collaborated with Spielberg and Lucas again on "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981), a splashy action adventure that harkened back to the 1930s Saturday matinee serials. He next made his directorial debut with the steaming erotic noir, "Body Heat" (1981), after which he wrote the weaker, but nonetheless substantial "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi" (1983). Kasdan earned considerable acclaim for writing and directing "The Big Chill" (1983) before delivering a well-received update of the Western with "Silverado" (1985). After returning to form with "The Accidental Tourist" (1988) and "Grand Canyon" (1991), Kasdan fell prey to indulgence with the overly long "Wyatt Earp" (1994) and the widely panned "Dreamcatcher" (2003). Though he remained relatively inactive since those high-profile missteps, Kasdan's reputation as an exquisite craftsman built hope that he would one day again return to his previous form.

Born on Jan. 14, 1949 in Miami Beach, FL, Kasdan was raised in West Virginia by his father, Clarence, who was an electronics store manager in several cities, and his mother, Sylvia, an employment counselor. After earning his bachelor's degree in literature and his master's in education from the University of Michigan, Kasdan ditched his intention to become a teacher and found work as an advertising copywriter for W.B. Doner in Detroit. Despite deploring the advertising world, he plugged away for five years, even winning a Clio Award, and eventually found himself working for Doyle, Dane, Bernbach Advertisers in Los Angeles. Once there, Kasdan began writing screenplays while still working in advertising until he sold his first script, "The Bodyguard," in 1976. Though originally intended as a Steve McQueen vehicle, the script was trapped in development hell until 1992, when it became a hit release starring Whitney Houston and Kevin Costner. Meanwhile, his screenplay for what became "Continental Divide" (1981) - an old school homage to Spencer Tracy/Katherine Hepburn romantic comedies - caught the eye of director Steven Spielberg and led to an introduction to George Lucas.

Kasdan's career truly took off when he was hired by Lucas to write "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) after the original screenwriter, Leigh Brackett, died of cancer. Brackett had written a first draft before she passed, with Lucas penning a couple more drafts before turning over the project to Kasdan. The ultimate result was Kasdan penning what many felt was the best installment of the franchise, while in the larger scope "Empire" was hailed as an exquisite space opera that represented the very best of sci-fi cinema, in large part due to its possessing a darker tone than its predecessor. Kasdan soon became the go-to writer for Lucas and Spielberg, with producer and director tapping him to write "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981), Lucas' contemporary update of the Saturday matinee serials that introduced late-century Hollywood's most iconic heroes, Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford). For an entire week, Lucas, Spielberg and Kasdan spent full days discussing the story, the transcripts of which Kasdan used to write his first draft. Over the course of several more drafts, it became more and more refined, while Lucas and Spielberg battled Paramount Pictures over the budget. Upon release, the exciting action adventure - which followed Jones' quest to find the mythical Ark of the Covenant before the Nazis - was widely hailed by critics on its way to become a huge box office hit that spawned three sequels of inconsistent quality.

Also that year, Kasdan finally realized his dream of becoming a director and made his debut with "Body Heat" (1981), a steamy erotic noir thriller about a smarmy Florida lawyer (William Hurt) seduced by a sultry woman (Kathleen Turner) into murdering her wealthy businessman husband. Without a doubt one of the sexiest thrillers released at the time, Kasdan's "Body Heat" was praised by critics and helped make the unknown Turner into a highly sought star. After "Continental Divide" was finally released with John Belushi in one of his last roles, Kasdan collaborated with Lucas on "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi" (1983), a script that was written well after the budget and models were in place. Initial concerns over whether or not star Harrison Ford would return to play Han Solo plagued the pre-production phase, with both star and writer agreeing that Solo should die as a result of self-sacrifice - an idea Lucas rejected. Arguably the weakest movie in the original trilogy, "Return of the Jedi" nonetheless was another massive box office success.

That same year, Kasdan directed his second feature, "The Big Chill" (1983), an ensemble drama that focused on a group of baby boomer college friends who reunite 15 years later for the funeral of a friend (Kevin Costner, whose limited scenes were cut.) Starring Glenn Close, William Hurt, Jeff Goldblum, JoBeth Williams, Kevin Kline and Meg Tilly, "The Big Chill" was both an artistic and commercial success, though it was compared to John Sayles' low-budget "The Return of the Secaucus Seven" (1980). While Sayles' film was a touching character study of friends lamenting the loss of their innocence, Kasdan's film came across as knee-jerk 1960s nostalgia, complete with Motown soundtrack. The film's success, however, paved the way for other Reagan-era movies that romanticized 1960s ideals in order to reach that most desirable demographic, the disillusioned hippie. Despite the film's trappings, "The Big Chill" earned Kasdan an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Kasdan went on to write and direct the Western saga, "Silverado" (1985), a fairly well-reviewed film that nonetheless suffered a bit from an overly complex narrative and flat characterizations. With the standard storyline of four outlaws (Kevin Kline, Scott Glenn, Kevin Costner and Danny Glover) banding together to take down a corrupt sheriff (Brian Dennehy), "Silverado" struggled to differentiate itself from other Westerns, though it was still favorably seen by audiences and critics.

With "The Accidental Tourist" (1988), based on Anne Tyler's quirky best-selling novel, Kasdan returned to his original form. The romantic drama focused on a travel writer (Hurt) who loses his son, separates from his wife (Kathleen Turner) and starts traveling the world, only to meet an unusual dog trainer (Geena Davis). Poignant and well-observed, "The Accidental Tourist" was the kind of intelligent, well-crafted work that Kasdan displayed earlier in his career, while featuring exemplary performances from the three leads, particularly Davis, who won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. For his efforts, Kasdan received a nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay as well as his first Best Picture nod. After directing Kevin Kline in the middling dark comedy, "I Love You to Death" (1990), Kasdan wrote and directed one of his most acclaimed films, "Grand Canyon" (1991), an ensemble drama about a group of forty-somethings struggling to address the issues of class, race and violence in Los Angeles. Dubbed by some as a "Big Chill for the '90s" and starring Danny Glover, Steve Martin, Mary McDonnell, Alfre Woodard, Mary-Louise Parker and Kevin Kline, "Grand Canyon" was a critical hit, but suffered from lackluster box office. Still, Kasdan earned another Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

Kasdan met with a considerably worse critical reception once "The Bodyguard" (1992) was finally released, though audiences paid no mind to reviews to the tune over $120 million at the box office, which was in part spawned by Whitney Houston's No. 1 single, "I Will Always Love You." Kasdan's next venture as auteur, "Wyatt Earp" (1994), which starred Costner in the title role, was overly long and rather indulgent exercise disguised as an epic biopic. Costner had previously been involved in another Earp Western, "Tombstone" (1993), but disagreed over the direction of the character and left the project to team with Kasdan. Released six months after "Tombstone," Kasdan's "Wyatt Earp" strikingly paled in comparison despite being a higher-profile and bigger-budgeted affair. Unfortunately, Kasdan did not fare any better with his next movie, "French Kiss" (1995), which became a success thanks to the comic savvy of stars Meg Ryan, Kline and Timothy Hutton, and the lush Paris scenery. While the world watched and wondered if he could recover the mastery of his best work, he next made rare acting appearances as Dr. Green in James L. Brooks' comedy "As Good As It Gets" (1997) and as a producer for "Home Fries" (1998), starring Drew Barrymore and Luke Wilson. His next project was the forgettable drama "Mumford" (1999) and the adaptation of Stephen King's novel, "Dreamcatcher" (2003), which was both maligned by critics and failed at the box office. Since the early millennium, Kasdan often worked as an uncredited script doctor on a number of studio pictures, while directing Kevin Kline in the low-budget comedy, "Darling Companion," which was shot in 2010.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Dreamcatcher (2003)
Director
Mumford (1999)
Director
French Kiss (1995)
Director
Wyatt Earp (1994)
Director
Grand Canyon (1991)
Director
I Love You To Death (1990)
Director
The Accidental Tourist (1988)
Director
Silverado (1985)
Director
The Big Chill (1983)
Director
Body Heat (1981)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

As Good As it Gets (1997)
Into The Night (1985)

Writer (Feature Film)

Star Wars: Episode IX (2019)
Writer (Uncredited)
Star Wars: Episode IX (2019)
Screenplay
Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)
Screenplay
Paradise Lost (2017)
Screenplay
Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)
Screenplay
Dreamcatcher (2003)
Screenplay
Mumford (1999)
Screenplay
Wyatt Earp (1994)
Screenplay
The Bodyguard (1992)
From Story
The Bodyguard (1992)
Screenwriter
The Bodyguard (1992)
Story By
Grand Canyon (1991)
Screenplay
The Accidental Tourist (1988)
Screenplay
Silverado (1985)
Screenplay
The Big Chill (1983)
Screenplay
Star Wars: Return of the Jedi (1983)
Screenplay
Body Heat (1981)
Screenwriter
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
Screenwriter
Continental Divide (1981)
Screenplay
Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
Screenplay

Producer (Feature Film)

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)
Executive Producer
In the Land of Women (2007)
Executive Producer
The TV Set (2006)
Executive Producer
Dreamcatcher (2003)
Producer
Mumford (1999)
Producer
Home Fries (1998)
Producer
Wyatt Earp (1994)
Producer
The Bodyguard (1992)
Producer
Grand Canyon (1991)
Producer
Jumpin at the Boneyard (1991)
Executive Producer
Immediate Family (1989)
Executive Producer
The Accidental Tourist (1988)
Producer
Cross My Heart (1987)
Producer
Silverado (1985)
Producer
The Big Chill (1983)
Executive Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

No Reservations (2007)
Other

Cast (Special)

Ted Danson: One Lucky Guy (2000)
Interviewee
Star Wars: The Magic and the Mystery (1997)
Wyatt Earp: Walk With a Legend (1994)
George Lucas: Heroes, Myths and Magic (1993)
The 13th Annual ACE Awards (1992)
Performer
The 18th Annual American Film Institute Life Achievement Award: A Salute to Sir David Lean (1990)
Performer

Articles

Body Heat (1981)


An atmospheric and steamy neo-noir, Body Heat (1981) is an impressive feature directorial debut by Lawrence Kasdan. Inspired by Kasdan’s love of film noir, specifically movies like The Big Sleep (1946), Out of the Past (1947) and The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Body Heat pays homage to the film noir style while boosting its sex appeal for a contemporary audience. The basic premise of a femme fatale and her lover plot to murder her wealthy husband was modelled from the noir Double Indemnity (1944). In Kasdan’s original screenplay, that premise takes on a whole new life with two new unsympathetic protagonists, a Florida setting and an unrelenting heatwave. William Hurt plays Ned Racine, a sleazy lawyer whose lust for a married woman lands him in hot water. Matty Walker, played by Kathleen Turner, is the object of his obsession and lures him into a plot to murder her investor husband Edmund (Richard Crenna).

Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting career was on the rise thanks to his collaborations with George Lucas on two of the original Star Wars movies and Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981). Kasdan took inspiration from his favorite filmmakers, John Sturges and Akira Kurosawa, as well as his favorite classic movies to update those styles of filmmaking with a fresh perspective. He presented his idea for Body Heat to Alan Ladd Jr., the head of 20th Century-Fox, who was interested in the project and put in on the books. When Ladd left the studio to start The Ladd Company, Kasdan’s script languished at Fox. According to the AFI, Fox dropped the project when a disagreement on casting couldn’t be resolved. Ladd was still interested in taking on Body Heat but felt that having a first-time director on the project would be a gamble. They reached an agreement that if Kasdan were to fail he would immediately be replaced by a more experienced director. George Lucas secretly signed on as guarantor, offering to pay a fee if Kasdan went over budget.

It was obvious that there was little confidence in Kasdan’s abilities. This had an effect on him and eventually influenced how he made Body Heat. If this was going to be his only opportunity to direct a film, then he would employ every filmmaking technique, especially those from film noir, that he wanted to try. Knowing full well that having a male director and male cinematographer, Richard H. Kline, might steer the film into becoming just another male fantasy, Kasdan hired Carole Littleton as the film editor to get a female perspective, especially when it came to the many sex scenes.

Kasdan insisted on casting unknowns in order to give the audience an opportunity to discover great talent for the very first time. Every character was complex, intriguing and kept audiences guessing. Even minor characters had to have some sort of captivating quality. Casting the right people was essential. The role of Matty Walker was carefully modeled in the image of 1940s era Lauren Bacall, and Kathleen Turner fit the bill. She had the sultry voice, the figure and the charisma to play the part. However, there was resistance to casting Turner because she had no previous film acting experience. According to the Los Angeles Times, New York casting agents refused to let her audition. It was when she auditioned for another film entirely, All the Marbles (1981), that she caught the eye of casting agent Wally Nicita, who offered her the script. Turner did a test with actor William Hurt and the two had such great chemistry on screen that they were cast as the leads.

Other newcomers included Mickey Rourke, in an early film role as the film’s arsonist, and Ted Danson, in his second film role as lawyer Peter Lowenstein. Danson was a year out from his breakout role on the TV show Cheers (1982). His character provides comedic relief in the film, and he even performs a Fred Astaire-inspired dance sequence. Kim Zimmer, Kathleen Turner’s replacement on the soap opera The Doctors, was cast because of her striking resemblance to Turner, which provided an important plot twist. Richard Crenna was one of the few established actors. Coincidentally, he played insurance agent Walter Neff in the 1973 TV movie remake of Double Indemnity and was now playing the murder victim instead. 

Production for Body Heat got off to a rocky start. Filming was set to begin August 1980 on the Jersey Shore. However, due to a Screen Actors Guild strike, the production had to be moved to Lake Worth, Florida. The delays pushed back filming to November 1980 when Florida was experiencing an unusually cold winter. The crew implemented various elements to depict a heatwave, including adding steam, running fans, spraying actors with water and using other visual cues. In an interview for the Blu-ray release, Kathleen Turner said that she would hold an ice cube in her mouth shortly before shooting a scene so the condensation wouldn’t show on screen when she spoke. Despite the challenges, filming moved forward. The final scene was shot in Kauai, Hawaii, and additional retakes were completed at the Zoetrope Studios in Los Angeles.

Body Heat premiered August 28, 1981 and then nationwide to 730 theaters on September 18. It became the 33rd highest-grossing film of that year earning $24 million dollars. It won over many critics. Vincent Canby of The New York Times called it “the steamiest, most thoroughly satisfying melodrama about love, lust and greed to be seen since Billy Wilder's ‘Double Indemnity.’” Kasdan was lauded for his skills as a first-time director, which genuinely took him by surprise. Body Heat put William Hurt, Kathleen Turner and Ted Danson on the map and is recognized as one of the most enticing neo-noir of the 1980s.

Body Heat (1981)

Body Heat (1981)

An atmospheric and steamy neo-noir, Body Heat (1981) is an impressive feature directorial debut by Lawrence Kasdan. Inspired by Kasdan’s love of film noir, specifically movies like The Big Sleep (1946), Out of the Past (1947) and The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Body Heat pays homage to the film noir style while boosting its sex appeal for a contemporary audience. The basic premise of a femme fatale and her lover plot to murder her wealthy husband was modelled from the noir Double Indemnity (1944). In Kasdan’s original screenplay, that premise takes on a whole new life with two new unsympathetic protagonists, a Florida setting and an unrelenting heatwave. William Hurt plays Ned Racine, a sleazy lawyer whose lust for a married woman lands him in hot water. Matty Walker, played by Kathleen Turner, is the object of his obsession and lures him into a plot to murder her investor husband Edmund (Richard Crenna).Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting career was on the rise thanks to his collaborations with George Lucas on two of the original Star Wars movies and Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981). Kasdan took inspiration from his favorite filmmakers, John Sturges and Akira Kurosawa, as well as his favorite classic movies to update those styles of filmmaking with a fresh perspective. He presented his idea for Body Heat to Alan Ladd Jr., the head of 20th Century-Fox, who was interested in the project and put in on the books. When Ladd left the studio to start The Ladd Company, Kasdan’s script languished at Fox. According to the AFI, Fox dropped the project when a disagreement on casting couldn’t be resolved. Ladd was still interested in taking on Body Heat but felt that having a first-time director on the project would be a gamble. They reached an agreement that if Kasdan were to fail he would immediately be replaced by a more experienced director. George Lucas secretly signed on as guarantor, offering to pay a fee if Kasdan went over budget.It was obvious that there was little confidence in Kasdan’s abilities. This had an effect on him and eventually influenced how he made Body Heat. If this was going to be his only opportunity to direct a film, then he would employ every filmmaking technique, especially those from film noir, that he wanted to try. Knowing full well that having a male director and male cinematographer, Richard H. Kline, might steer the film into becoming just another male fantasy, Kasdan hired Carole Littleton as the film editor to get a female perspective, especially when it came to the many sex scenes.Kasdan insisted on casting unknowns in order to give the audience an opportunity to discover great talent for the very first time. Every character was complex, intriguing and kept audiences guessing. Even minor characters had to have some sort of captivating quality. Casting the right people was essential. The role of Matty Walker was carefully modeled in the image of 1940s era Lauren Bacall, and Kathleen Turner fit the bill. She had the sultry voice, the figure and the charisma to play the part. However, there was resistance to casting Turner because she had no previous film acting experience. According to the Los Angeles Times, New York casting agents refused to let her audition. It was when she auditioned for another film entirely, All the Marbles (1981), that she caught the eye of casting agent Wally Nicita, who offered her the script. Turner did a test with actor William Hurt and the two had such great chemistry on screen that they were cast as the leads.Other newcomers included Mickey Rourke, in an early film role as the film’s arsonist, and Ted Danson, in his second film role as lawyer Peter Lowenstein. Danson was a year out from his breakout role on the TV show Cheers (1982). His character provides comedic relief in the film, and he even performs a Fred Astaire-inspired dance sequence. Kim Zimmer, Kathleen Turner’s replacement on the soap opera The Doctors, was cast because of her striking resemblance to Turner, which provided an important plot twist. Richard Crenna was one of the few established actors. Coincidentally, he played insurance agent Walter Neff in the 1973 TV movie remake of Double Indemnity and was now playing the murder victim instead. Production for Body Heat got off to a rocky start. Filming was set to begin August 1980 on the Jersey Shore. However, due to a Screen Actors Guild strike, the production had to be moved to Lake Worth, Florida. The delays pushed back filming to November 1980 when Florida was experiencing an unusually cold winter. The crew implemented various elements to depict a heatwave, including adding steam, running fans, spraying actors with water and using other visual cues. In an interview for the Blu-ray release, Kathleen Turner said that she would hold an ice cube in her mouth shortly before shooting a scene so the condensation wouldn’t show on screen when she spoke. Despite the challenges, filming moved forward. The final scene was shot in Kauai, Hawaii, and additional retakes were completed at the Zoetrope Studios in Los Angeles.Body Heat premiered August 28, 1981 and then nationwide to 730 theaters on September 18. It became the 33rd highest-grossing film of that year earning $24 million dollars. It won over many critics. Vincent Canby of The New York Times called it “the steamiest, most thoroughly satisfying melodrama about love, lust and greed to be seen since Billy Wilder's ‘Double Indemnity.’” Kasdan was lauded for his skills as a first-time director, which genuinely took him by surprise. Body Heat put William Hurt, Kathleen Turner and Ted Danson on the map and is recognized as one of the most enticing neo-noir of the 1980s.

Life Events

1972

Worked as advertising copywriter for W B Doner and Company in Detroit, MI

1976

Sold first screenplay, "The Bodyguard"; remained unproduced until 1992 when it starred Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston; reportedly written as a Steve McQueen vehicle originally (date approximate)

1980

His screenplay for "Continental Divide" caught the attention of Steven Spielberg who introduced Kasdan to George Lucas; hired by Lucas to work on first screenplay filmed, "The Empire Strikes Back" (which Kasdan took over when screenwriter Leigh Brackett died)

1981

Penned "Raiders of the Lost Ark", the first installment of the Indiana Jones series, for producer Lucas and director Speilberg

1981

Directorial debut, "Body Heat"

1983

With Lucas, co-wrote the third installment of the "Star Wars" series, "The Return of the Jedi"

1983

Executive produced first film "The Big Chill" (also director and co-screenwriter), earned first Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay

1985

Produced first film, "Silverado" (also director and co-writer)

1985

Played Second Detective in John Landis' "Into the Night"

1987

Produced first film that he did not direct or write, "Cross My Heart", directed by Armyan Bernstein

1988

Co-wrote, co-produced and directed "The Accidental Tourist", starring William Hurt, Geena Davis and Kathleen Turner; earned Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay

1989

Served as executive producer on first film he did not direct or script, "Immediate Family", directed by Jonathan Kaplan

1990

Directed first film that he did not co-write, "I Love You to Death"

1991

Produced, directed and co-wrote (with wife Meg) "Grand Canyon"; received fourth Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay

1992

His script for "The Bodyguard" finally produced as vehicle for Costner and Whitney Houston

1994

Produced, directed and co-scripted (with Dan Gordon) "Wyatt Earp", starring Costner in the title role

1995

Stage directing debut, John Patrick Shanley's "Four Dogs and a Bone"

1995

Helmed (only) "French Kiss", starring Meg Ryan (one of the producers), Kevin Kline and Timothy Hutton

1997

Portrayed Dr Green in James L Brooks' "As Good As It Gets"

1998

Produced "Home Fries", starring Drew Barrymore, Jake Busey and Shelley Duvall

Photo Collections

The Big Chill - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Big Chill (1983), starring Kevin Kline, JoBeth Williams, William Hurt, Glenn Close, and Jeff Goldblum. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Videos

Movie Clip

Big Chill, The (1983) -- (Movie Clip) Cold World Out There Together after the funeral of a college friend, Mary Kay Place is a lawyer, Jeff Goldblum a writer, Tom Berenger a TV actor, Kevin Kline and Glenn Close their hosts, Jobeth Williams and druggie William Hurt their pals, in Lawrence Kasdan's The Big Chill, 1983.
Big Chill, The (1983) -- (Movie Clip) I'm Still Evolving Arising the morning after the funeral of their college friend, Jobeth Williams and Tom Berenger go shopping, Glenn Close and Mary Kay Place sort clothes, and William Hurt, as recreational drug enthusiast Nick, finds one of them new-fangled video cameras, in Lawrence Kasdan's The Big Chill, 1983.
Big Chill, The (1983) -- (Movie Clip) I Told Him He Was Wasting His Life Rolling Stones' music from the church to the grave of their suicide-victim friend, mourners William Hurt and Mary Kay Place, Jeff Goldblum and Tom Berenger with Meg Tilly, Jobeth Williams with husband Don Galloway, who's not one of the crowd, early in Lawrence Kasdan's The Big Chill, 1983.
Big Chill, The (1983) -- (Movie Clip) This Is One Of Those Times After the music-driven opening in which all learn of the death by suicide of a college friend, gathering for the funeral are Kevin Kline, Tom Berenger, Jeff Goldblum, Meg Tilly, Glenn Close, Mary Kay Place, Jobeth Williams, James Gillis the preacher, in Lawrence Kasdan's The Big Chill, 1983.
Big Chill, The (1983) -- (Movie Clip) Ain't Too Proud To Beg Dining the evening after the funeral of suicide victim friend Alex, friends (Glenn Close, Jobeth Williams, Tom Berenger, Mary Kay Place, Kevin Kline, Jeff Goldblum, William Hurt, Meg Tilly) do the dishes to a Temptations' song, a popular scene from Lawerene Kasdan's The Big Chill, 1983.

Trailer

Family

Clarence Norman Kasdan
Father
Retail manager. Ran electronics stores in several cities.
Sylvia Sarah Kasdan
Mother
Employment counselor.
Mark Kasdan
Brother
Screenwriter. Co-wrote "Silverado" (1985) with Kasdan; also wrote "Criminal Law" (1988).
Jacob Kasdan
Son
Director, screenwriter, producer. Born c. 1974; appeared in several of his father's films; first feature "Zero Effect" (1998).
Jonathan Kasdan
Son
Screenwriter. Born c. 1980; appeared in several of father's films; staff writer on NBC series "Freaks and Geeks".

Companions

Meg Kasdan
Wife
Screenwriter. Married on November 28, 1971; born c. 1948; met while they were both students at the University of Michigan; co-wrote "Grand Canyon" (1991).

Bibliography