Glenda Jackson


Actor
Glenda Jackson

About

Also Known As
Glenda May Jackson
Birth Place
Cheshire, England, GB
Born
May 09, 1936

Biography

RADA-trained Glenda Jackson was shaped by her work with the Royal Shakespeare Company which she joined in 1964 and specifically by director Peter Brook's experimental Theatre of Cruelty season that year and its Antoine Artaud-influenced improvisational games. She won acclaim for her chilling performance as an asylum inmate portraying Danton's murderer Charlotte Corday in the 1965 London ...

Family & Companions

Roy Hodges
Husband
Former theater director, art gallery owner. Married in 1958; divorced in 1976; met while Jackson was performing with the Crewe repertory theater and he was stage manager c. 1957.
Andy Phillips
Companion
Lighting designer. Together from 1975 until c. 1991.

Bibliography

"Glenda Jackson: The Biography"
Chris Bryant, HarperCollins (1999)
"Glenda Jackson"
David Nathan (1984)

Notes

Glenda Jackson was named after the 1930s American film actress Glenda Farrell and after her grandmother May.

Jackson's former husband Roy Hodges is reputed to have said about her: "If she'd gone into politics she'd be prime minister; if she'd gone into crime she'd be Jack the Ripper."

Biography

RADA-trained Glenda Jackson was shaped by her work with the Royal Shakespeare Company which she joined in 1964 and specifically by director Peter Brook's experimental Theatre of Cruelty season that year and its Antoine Artaud-influenced improvisational games. She won acclaim for her chilling performance as an asylum inmate portraying Danton's murderer Charlotte Corday in the 1965 London and New York productions of "Marat/Sade," staged by Brook. And although she made a brief screen appearance as an extra in "This Sporting Life" (1963), her first significant film work was reprising the role of Corday in Brook's 1967 screen version of "Marat/Sade," perhaps auguring the many neurotics she has so brilliantly portrayed on stage and film.

Plain-featured but striking looking, with a gift for conveying blistering disgust or contempt with her curled lip, her clipped, almost spitting delivery and her cold stare, Jackson has nonetheless played a wide range of roles from queens, romantics, seductresses and sensualists to independent women and intellectuals; she has excelled at portraying high-strung, strong-willed and sexually rapacious women in notable films by such directors as Ken Russell ("The Music Lovers" 1971), John Schlesinger ("Sunday, Bloody Sunday" 1973) and Joseph Losey ("The Romantic Englishwoman" 1975).

Jackson won two Best Actress Oscars, for her roles in Russell's D.H. Lawrence adaptation, "Women in Love" (1970) and for her change of pace performance in Melvin Frank's light romantic comedy "A Touch of Class" (1973). She also won two Emmys for her portrait of Queen Elizabeth I from youth to old age on the series "Elizabeth R" (shown in the USA on PBS in 1972).

Jackson made an assured switch to middle-aged roles in the mid-1970s, beginning with the Hepburn-Tracy style comedy, "House Calls" (1978), opposite Walter Matthau. In 1992, Jackson won a seat in the British Parliament as a member of the Labour Party and retired from acting.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Doombeach (1990)
Miss
King of the Wind (1990)
Queen Caroline
The Rainbow (1989)
Anna Brangwen
Business As Usual (1988)
Babs Flynn
Salome's Last Dance (1988)
Beyond Therapy (1987)
Turtle Diary (1986)
Sakharov (1984)
Elena Bonner
The Return of the Soldier (1982)
Margaret Grey
Giro City (1982)
Sophie
And Nothing But the Truth (1982)
Sophie
An Act of Love: The Patricia Neal Story (1981)
Hopscotch (1980)
Health (1980)
Lost And Found (1979)
Patricia Brittenham
House Calls (1978)
Ann Atkinson
The Class of Miss MacMichael (1978)
Conor Macmichael
Stevie (1978)
Nasty Habits (1977)
The Incredible Sarah (1976)
Sarah Bernhardt
The Romantic Englishwoman (1975)
Hedda (1975)
Hedda
The Maids (1974)
Solange
The Triple Echo (1973)
Alice
The Nelson Affair (1973)
Lady Hamilton
A Touch Of Class (1973)
Vicki Allessio
Il Sorriso del Grande Tentatore (1973)
Sister Geraldine
The Boy Friend (1971)
Rita Monroe
Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971)
Alex Greville
Mary, Queen of Scots (1971)
Queen Elizabeth
The Music Lovers (1971)
Nina [Milyukova]
Women in Love (1970)
Gudrun Brangwen
Negatives (1968)
Vivien
Tell Me Lies (1968)
The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (1967)
Charlotte Corday

Cast (Special)

The First Annual Comedy Hall of Fame (1993)
Performer
The House of Bernarda Alba (1991)
Bernarda Alba
A Murder of Quality (1991)
Strange Interlude (1988)
Man Made Famine (1986)
Narration
The Thames (1982)
Narrator

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

The Rise and Fall of Humpty Dumpty (1990)
Voice Of Princess

Life Events

1957

London stage debut in "All Kinds of Men"

1957

Made stage debut in "Separate Tables" at Worthing, England

1963

Film debut as an extra in a party scene (as one of a group singing "For he's a jolly good fellow") in "This Sporting Life"

1963

Joined Royal Shakespeare Company

1964

Appeared in Peter Brook's and Charles Marowitz's experimental Theatre of Cruelty season, sponsored by the RSC at LAMDA

1964

Played one of title character's girlfriends in London stage production of "Alfie"

1965

Broadway debut, "Marat/Sade"

1965

Made film acting debut in "Benefit of the Doubt," about the staging of the RSC production of the play "US" (directed by Peter Whitehead)

1965

Starred as Charlotte Corday in London premiere of "Marat/Sade"

1967

Reprised role of Charlotte Corday in the Peter Brook film of "Marat/Sade"

1974

Formed Bowden Productions with American producer Robert Enders after they made "The Maids" (1974), subsequently made "Hedda" (1975), "Nasty Habits" (1976), and "Stevie" (1978) together

1983

The Glenda Jackson Theatre opened in Hoylake

1992

Ran against Tory Conservative Oliver Letwin for a seat in the House of Commons as the Labour Candidate from the Hampstead and Highgate sections of London; won election

1997

Named minister of rail transport by Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair

1999

Resigned from her junior minister position and announced candidacy for the post of mayor of London; lost Labor primary to Frank Dobson

2000

Appointed as advisor on homelessness by London mayor Ken Livingstone

Photo Collections

Women in Love - Movie Posters
Women in Love - Movie Posters

Videos

Movie Clip

Marat/Sade (1967) - We Ask Your Kindly Indulgence The necessarily unorthodox opening from the adaptation of the experimental play, Clifford Rose as Coulmier begins to explain the goings-on at the French asylum at Charenton, from the original play in German by Peter Weiss, adapted by Adrian Mitchell, directed by Peter Brook, from Marat/Sade, 1967.
Marat/Sade (1967) - Corday Waltz The Herald (Michael Williams) resumes narration, Glenda Jackson as the inmate playing the character Charlotte Corday, with a song from the play about the so-far mute revolutionary writer Marat (Ian Richardson), from director Peter Brook’s adaptation of the original play by Peter Weiss, Marat/Sade, 1967.
Marat/Sade (1967) - France Of Fifteen Years Ago Michael Wiliams as “The Herald” begins the actual performance by the inmates, including the introduction of Ian Richardson as Jean-Paul Marat and Glenda Jackson as Charlotte Corday, in director Peter Brook’s celebrated adaptation of his stage production, in Marat/Sade, 1967.
Romantic Englishwoman, The (1975) - By The Way I'm A Poet At home in England, cynical writer Lewis (Michael Caine), with his wife Elizabeth (Glenda Jackson, title character), raising the possibility of using her recent trip to a German spa as material for his novel, in Joseph Losey’s The Romantic Englishwoman, 1975, co-written by Tom Stoppard.
Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) - It's Always Bad Here Director John Schlesinger introducing London executive Alex (Glenda Jackson), ringing the same apartment co-star Peter Finch tried earlier, then calling a friend (Vivian Pickles), whose children she's agreed to watch, in Sunday Bloody Sunday, 1971, one of the romping kids the director's daughter Emma.
Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) - You Might've Been Killed! Divorced executive Alex (Glenda Jackson) and bisexual artist boyfriend Bob (Murray Head) directed by John Schlesinger, minding their friends' children in London's Greenwich Park, young Lucy (Kimi Tallmadge) causing a small disaster, in Sunday Bloody Sunday, 1971.
Hopscotch (1980) - Have Any Sausage? In Salzburg, semi-fugitive CIA officer Kendig (Walter Matthau) meets Isobel (Glenda Jackson), whom we soon learn is an ex-lover, returning to her villa, in Ronald Neame's spy-comedy Hopscotch, 1980.
Hopscotch (1980) - The Other Figaro Writing his threatened memoirs in Austria, renegade CIA man Kendig (Walter Matthau) shocks lover Isobel (Glenda Jackson), whereupon his boss (Ned Beatty) and ex-colleague (Sam Waterston) consult, in director Ronald Neame's Hopscotch, 1980.

Trailer

Family

Harry Jackson
Father
Bricklayer, brickmaker.
Joan Jackson
Mother
Barmaid, maid, shop assistant.
Daniel Hodges
Son
Born in 1969; father, Roy Hodges; on February 21, 1992 lost his left eye when a broken beer glass was shoved in his face after he stood up for two black men who were being taunted by whites in a south London pub.

Companions

Roy Hodges
Husband
Former theater director, art gallery owner. Married in 1958; divorced in 1976; met while Jackson was performing with the Crewe repertory theater and he was stage manager c. 1957.
Andy Phillips
Companion
Lighting designer. Together from 1975 until c. 1991.

Bibliography

"Glenda Jackson: The Biography"
Chris Bryant, HarperCollins (1999)
"Glenda Jackson"
David Nathan (1984)

Notes

Glenda Jackson was named after the 1930s American film actress Glenda Farrell and after her grandmother May.

Jackson's former husband Roy Hodges is reputed to have said about her: "If she'd gone into politics she'd be prime minister; if she'd gone into crime she'd be Jack the Ripper."

"She was a monster, frankly." --director Peter Eyre quote in "Glenda Jackson: The Biography" by Chris Bryant

"I hate the idea of acting being some kind of mystical process. It isn't. I mean you do as much as an individual can do; you clear the undergrowth, you get rid of the stuff that isn't useful, you discard the ideas that aren't right. You do everything you can, both physically and mentally, to be ready for something else to happen. That's what the performance is: is something else going to happen? I suppose there's a kind of mystery element in that, but I don't like the idea of it being entirely a process that is without any kind of guiding sense." --Glenda Jackson (quoted in David Nathan's 1984 biography, "Glenda Jackson")

Jackson's longtime agent Peter Crouch said of her: "I never thought she was going to be the easiest actress to promote. She has an individual quality which I reckoned was not going to appeal to everybody. But there is an enormous sex appeal. Something exudes from her like it does from a very healthy animal. She hasn't a high opinion of her own physical attractions. She once told me, 'I don't know why I keep getting all these scripts with nude scenes. I've got varicose veins, piano legs and no tits.' But the camera falls in love with her. A lighting cameraman once told me it was because she had 'wonderful lighting about the eyes' by which it turned out that he meant she had high cheek bones. So forget the ski-run nose and the snaggle tooth; the eyes are the things that matter in films." --From David Nathan's 1984 biography, "Glenda Jackson")

She received a honorary DLitt from Liverpool University (1978)

She was given the Women's Project's Exceptional Achievement Award (1988)

Jackson underwent an emergency appendectomy on October 23, 1999