Brown Holmes


Biography

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

My True Story (1951)
Screenwriter
Shed No Tears (1948)
Screenwriter
Leather Gloves (1948)
Screenwriter
Three Little Girls in Blue (1946)
Adaptation
Moon Over Miami (1941)
Screenwriter
Castle on the Hudson (1940)
Screenwriter
Sporting Blood (1940)
Contr to Screenplay const
Second Fiddle (1939)
Contract Writer
Blackmail (1939)
Added scenes
Hollywood Cavalcade (1939)
Story
Three Blind Mice (1938)
Screenwriter
The Crime of Doctor Hallet (1938)
Screenwriter
Goodbye Broadway (1938)
Contract Writer
The Crime of Dr. Hallett (1938)
Screenwriter
Top of the Town (1937)
Screenwriter
The Lady Fights Back (1937)
Screenwriter
Life Begins with Love (1937)
Screenwriter
The Man in Blue (1937)
Contract Writer
Oh, Doctor (1937)
Screenwriter
Marry the Girl (1937)
Contr to trmt
Ever Since Eve (1937)
Contr to dial
Satan Met a Lady (1936)
Screenwriter
Flying Hostess (1936)
Screenwriter
Snowed Under (1936)
Screenwriter
The Case of the Lucky Legs (1935)
Screenwriter
The Florentine Dagger (1935)
Additional Dialogue
We're in the Money (1935)
Screenwriter
The Case of the Curious Bride (1935)
Additional Dialogue
While the Patient Slept (1935)
Additional Dialogue
I Sell Anything (1934)
Screenwriter
Heat Lightning (1934)
Screenwriter
Dark Hazard (1934)
Screenwriter
The Avenger (1933)
Adaptation
The Stranger's Return (1933)
Screenwriter
Ladies They Talk About (1933)
Screenwriter
I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932)
Screenwriter
20,000 Years in Sing Sing (1932)
Screenwriter
The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)
Adaptation
Street of Women (1932)
Adapted and dial
Play Girl (1932)
Adapted and dial
The Maltese Falcon (1931)
Screenplay and dial

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Satan Met A Lady (1936) - You're In The Bag Run out of town by police brass in some city, slick private eye Warren William (going by the name Nash, in this instance) immediately ingratiates himself with well-heeled Mrs. Arden (Alison Skipworth) on the train, co-top billed Bette Davis, smartly outfitted by Orry-Kelly, eavesdropping, early in Warner Bros.’ second, and loosest adaptation of Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, Satan Met A Lady, 1936.
Satan Met A Lady (1936) - I Thought You Were Sleeping Back in town enjoying banter with the secretary Murgatroyd (Marie Wilson) of his long-ago partner Ames (Porter Hall), Shane (Warren William) acts gallant for new client Bette Davis as Miss Purvis (the Mary Astor role in the landmark 1941 version of Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon), not apparently realizing she’s been watching him, in Satan Met A Lady, 1936.
Satan Met A Lady (1936) - Without Any Phonus Balonus Having intercepted her, attempting to leave town, the morning after the murder of her maybe-accomplice and his detective partner, private eye Shane (Warren William) jousts with Valerie Purvis (Bette Davis), early in the second Warner Bros. adaptation of The Maltese Falcon, Satan Met A Lady, 1936.
Maltese Falcon, The (1931) - The Black Figure Of A Bird Otto Matieson plays a customer calling himself “Doctor” Cairo, in a less flamboyant performance that Peter Lorre’s in John Huston’s landmark 1941 re-make, Ricardo Cortez as Sam Spade, Una Merkel his excited assistant, in the first movie version of The Maltese Falcon, 1931.
Maltese Falcon, The (1931) - A Guy Named Thursby Still on the evening of the murder of his partner Archer, Sam Spade (Ricardo Cortez) receives two San Francisco cops he clearly knows well (J. Farrell MacDonald and Robert Elliot as Polhaus and Dundy), and learns that their client was also killed, but sharing little, in the 1931 version of The Maltese Falcon.
Maltese Falcon, The (1931) - Her Name's Wonderly Opening Hollywood’s first pass on Dashiell Hammett’s celebrated novel, Ricardo Cortez as a dandier Sam Spade of San Francisco, Una Merkel as his assistant Effie, eager to introduce a new client with an odd name (Bebe Daniels), Roy Del Ruth directing, in Warner Bros.’ The Maltese Falcon, 1931.
Ladies They Talk About (1933) - She Likes To Wrestle Cheesy process shot but new inmate Nan (Barbara Stanwyck) and veteran Linda (Lillian Roth) on fire, visiting Mrs. Arlington (Cecil Cunningham), Blondie (Helen Mann), Aunt Maggie (Maude Eburne) and a husky matron (Helen Dickson), in Ladies They Talk About, 1933.
Ladies They Talk About (1933) - Too Much Deaconing First scene for crusading newsman Slade (Preston Foster), then joining freshly busted, also guilty, Nan (Barbara Stanwyck), reminiscing as the D-A (Robert McWade) considers his options, in Ladies They Talk About, 1933.
Ladies They Talk About (1933) - Fresh Fish Like You Newly famous bank robber Nan (Barbara Stanwyck) strides into the cell block, an update from the reporter who put her away coming on the radio, as she faces down matron Noonan (Ruth Donnelly) and inmate Susie (Dorothy Burgess), in Ladies They Talk About, 1933.
Ladies They Talk About (1933) - A Man's Running Wild! Dolled-up Barbara Stanwyck making a phone call that turns out to be a diversion, then a past-his-prime bank guard (Harry Gibbon) is supposed to resist her asking to open up early, and her gang busts in, opening Ladies They Talk About, 1933, from a play by actress and one-time San Quentin inmate Dorothy Mackaye.
I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang (1932) - Hard Labor Jim (Paul Muni) learns about breaking rocks the hard way with some counsel from Bomber (Edward Ellis) and Sebastian (Everett Brown) in director Mervyn LeRoy's II Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang, 1932.
I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang (1932) - Where He Probably Belongs Landlady and casual girlfriend Marie (Glenda Farrell), arguably the only actor in the picture working on a par with star Paul Muni, turns on him, as now-successful prison escapee "Allen James," as he gets ready to move out in, Mervyn LeRoy's I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang, 1932.

Bibliography