Earl Baldwin


Biography

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

Juke Box Rhythm (1959)
Screenwriter
South Sea Woman (1953)
Adaptation
Lullaby of Broadway (1951)
Writer
Africa Screams (1949)
Original story and Screenplay
Make Mine Laughs (1949)
Screenwriter
Texas, Brooklyn & Heaven (1948)
Adaptation
Breakfast in Hollywood (1946)
Original story and Screenplay
Hold That Blonde (1945)
Screenwriter
Greenwich Village (1944)
Screenwriter
Irish Eyes Are Smiling (1944)
Screenwriter
Pin Up Girl (1944)
Screenwriter
The Navy Comes Through (1942)
Adaptation
Unholy Partners (1941)
Screenwriter
Honeymoon for Three (1941)
Screenwriter
Brother Orchid (1940)
Screenwriter
She Couldn't Say No (1940)
Screenwriter
The Man Who Talked Too Much (1940)
Screenwriter
Brother Rat and a Baby (1940)
Contr to Screenplay const and dial
My Love Came Back (1940)
Screenwriter
Invisible Stripes (1939)
Contr to trmt
Off the Record (1939)
Screenwriter
The Roaring Twenties (1939)
Contr to Screenplay const
A Slight Case of Murder (1938)
Screenwriter
Gold Diggers in Paris (1938)
Screenwriter
Cowboy from Brooklyn (1938)
Screenwriter
Going Places (1938)
Dial
Ever Since Eve (1937)
Screenwriter
Cain and Mabel (1936)
Contr to Screenplay const
The Irish in Us (1935)
Screenwriter
Go into Your Dance (1935)
Screenwriter
Devil Dogs of the Air (1935)
Screenwriter
A Very Honorable Guy (1934)
Screenwriter
Wonder Bar (1934)
Screenplay and Adapted
6 Day Bike Rider (1934)
Story and Screenplay
Here Comes the Navy (1934)
Screenwriter
Havana Widows (1933)
Screenwriter
Wild Boys of the Road (1933)
Screenwriter
Blondie Johnson (1933)
Story and Screenplay
The Crash (1932)
Screenwriter
The Tenderfoot (1932)
Adaptation
Life Begins (1932)
Screenplay Adapted
Doctor X (1932)
Screenwriter
The Mouthpiece (1932)
Adapted and dial
Central Park (1932)
Screenwriter
The Tip-Off (1931)
Screenplay and dial
The Naughty Flirt (1931)
Screenplay Adapted
The Big Shot (1931)
Screenplay and dial
Sweet Mama (1930)
Screenwriter
The Widow From Chicago (1930)
Screenwriter
College Lovers (1930)
Story
The Widow From Chicago (1930)
Story
The Widow From Chicago (1930)
Dial
Sweet Mama (1930)
Dial
Red Hot Rhythm (1929)
Scen
The Broadway Melody (1929)
Titles
Red Hot Rhythm (1929)
Dial
The Sophomore (1929)
Dial
Brotherly Love (1928)
Scen
On ze Boulevard (1927)
Titles

Producer (Feature Film)

Ever Since Eve (1937)
Producer
Gold Diggers of 1937 (1936)
Associate Producer
Miss Pacific Fleet (1935)
Supervisor

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Very Honorable Guy, A (1934) - I May Look Dumb In the opening scene we met goons Ponzetti and O’Hara (Harold Huber, Arthur Vinton) who had the idea to use the popular “Feet” Samuels (Joe E. Brown, title character) as a means to get to Hendrickson (George Pat Collins), who owes their gangster boss, and it goes plenty wrong, Lloyd Bacon directing, in A Very Honorable Guy, 1934, from a Damon Runyon story.
Shut My Big Mouth (1942) - Beautify West! Opening his first feature on his new Columbia contract after two years recovering from car-crash injuries, Joe E. Brown is visionary florist Wellington Holmes, heading west with sidekick Oglethorpe (Fritz Feld), soon pursued by Buckskin Bill (Victor Jory), Hank Bell and Earle Hodgins driving the stage, in Shut My Big Mouth, 1942.
Pin Up Girl (1944) - I Don't Tell Fibs! At this point we’ve no idea that Lorry (Betty Grable), most popular gal at the Missoula, Mo. USO, is given to fibbing, but we learn more when she catches the train with girlfriend Kaye (Dorothea Kent), early in the Twentieth Century-Fox musical Pin Up Girl, 1944.
Pin Up Girl (1944) - Don't Carry Tales Out Of School Miffed New York night club star Molly (Martha Raye) calls Lorry (Betty Grable, with pal Dorothea Kent, from Missouri) on her claim she starred in a just-closed Broadway show, so owner Joe E. Brown introduces her for a number by James V. Monaco and Mack Gordon, in Pin Up Girl, 1944.
Here Comes The Navy (1934) - He Don't Mean Liquor! Now shooting at the Naval Training Station in San Diego, James Cagney and Frank McHugh as recruits Chesty (who signed up just to settle a score with an officer) and Droopy tangle with some real officers recruited as actors, in Warner Bros.’ Here Comes The Navy, 1934.
Here Comes The Navy (1934) - Let's Have A Hot One! Their first-ever scene, in the first of nine features they made together, Pat O’Brien as Navy officer Biff (escorting Ida Darling et al) meets James Cagney as iron worker Chesty, with background shots from the Navy Yard at Bremerton, WA, Lloyd Bacon directing, opening Warner Bros.’ Here Comes The Navy, 1934.
Here Comes The Navy (1934) - Looks Too Much Like A Casket James Cagney, introduced as grimy Navy yard worker Chesty, becomes a dance-hall dandy in the next scene, personally financing the trophy he intends to win with spikey girlfriend Gladys (Dorothy Tree), Lloyd Bacon directing from a crafty original screenplay by Warner Bros. stalwarts Earl Baldwin and Ben Markson, in Here Comes The Navy, 1934.
Here Comes The Navy (1934) - Look At The Trim Lines! Now shooting on board the U.S.S Arizona, before it became the famous memorial at Pearl Harbor, swabbies Droopy (Frank McHugh) and Chesty (James Cagney), who joined the Navy to get even with officer Biff (Pat O’Brien), who stole a previous girlfriend, get their heads turned by Gloria Stuart, not yet knowing she’s Pat’s sister, in Here Comes The Navy, 1934.
Blondie Johnson (1933) - Not During Business Hours Arriving in the big city, having sworn to turn things around after her mom died upstate from sheer poverty, the so-far virtuous title character (Joan Blondell) tries some trickery on cabbie Red (Sterling Holloway), Ray Enright directing, early in Warner Bros.’ Blondie Johnson, 1933.
Blondie Johnson (1933) - Still Five Cents? Entrance of second-billed Chester Morris as Danny, entering the big-city speak’, noticing the title character (Joan Blondell) and sorta buying her sob story, not recognizing that the cabbie he calls (Sterling Holloway) is her scam partner on her first night in town, early in Blondie Johnson, 1933.
Blondie Johnson (1933) - Stop Being So Ambitious Having earned each other’s respect, Danny (Chester Morris) and new-in-town Blondie (Joan Blondell, in a role written for her by Warner Bros. stalwart Earl Baldwin) pitch his gangster boss Max (Arthur Vinton) on her plan to get a henchman out of a murder charge, then consider further options, in Blondie Johnson, 1933.
Blondie Johnson (1933) - In The Back Room Of A Drug Store Opening with some emotional wallop and Depression evocation, title character Joan Blondell, in her first starring part at Warner Bros., bounces off the welfare agency staff (Charles Dow Clark, Naomi Childers) then rushes home where a family friend (Sam Godfrey) has bad news, in Blondie Johnson, 1933.

Bibliography