Samuel Hoffenstein


Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
Russia
Born
October 09, 1890
Died
October 06, 1947

Biography

During his Hollywood career, Samuel Hoffenstein wrote a variety of screenplays. Hoffenstein began his writing career for film with such titles as the Phillips Holmes crime adaptation "An American Tragedy" (1931). He was nominated for an Academy Award for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" in 1932. After receiving this honor, Hoffenstein wrote scripts for the Charles Laughton dramatic adaptation ...

Biography

During his Hollywood career, Samuel Hoffenstein wrote a variety of screenplays. Hoffenstein began his writing career for film with such titles as the Phillips Holmes crime adaptation "An American Tragedy" (1931). He was nominated for an Academy Award for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" in 1932. After receiving this honor, Hoffenstein wrote scripts for the Charles Laughton dramatic adaptation "White Woman" (1933) and "Song of Songs" (1933). Toward the end of his career, Hoffenstein wrote "Flesh and Fantasy" (1943) with Charles Boyer. Hoffenstein was most recently credited in the drama "Give My Regards to Broadway" (1948) with Dan Dailey. He followed this recognition with scripts for "Sentimental Journey" (1946) and the Charles Boyer comedy "Cluny Brown" (1946). Hoffenstein passed away in October 1947 at the age of 57.

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

Give My Regards to Broadway (1948)
Screenwriter
The Homestretch (1947)
Contract Writer
Carnival in Costa Rica (1947)
Original Screenplay
Cluny Brown (1946)
Screenwriter
Sentimental Journey (1946)
Screenwriter
Laura (1944)
Screenwriter
Phantom of the Opera (1943)
Screenwriter
Flesh and Fantasy (1943)
Screenwriter
His Butler's Sister (1943)
Original Screenplay
Tales of Manhattan (1942)
Original stories and Screenplay by
The Loves of Edgar Allan Poe (1942)
Screenwriter
That Night in Rio (1941)
Additional Dialogue
The Great American Broadcast (1941)
Contract Writer
Lydia (1941)
Screenplay and dial
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941)
Contract Writer
The Wizard of Oz (1939)
Contract Writer
Bridal Suite (1939)
Screenwriter
The Great Waltz (1938)
Screenwriter
Conquest (1937)
Screenwriter
Desire (1936)
Screenwriter
Piccadilly Jim (1936)
Contr to dial
Love Before Breakfast (1936)
Contract Writer
Two in a Crowd (1936)
Contract Writer
The Voice of Bugle Ann (1936)
Screenwriter
Two for Tonight (1935)
Contr to trmt
Paris in Spring (1935)
Screenwriter
Enchanted April (1935)
Screenwriter
Marie Galante (1934)
Contr to Screenplay const
The Fountain (1934)
Dial
Change of Heart (1934)
Additional Dialogue
All Men Are Enemies (1934)
Screenplay and dial
Wharf Angel (1934)
Screenwriter
The Song of Songs (1933)
Screenwriter
White Woman (1933)
Screenwriter
Sinners in the Sun (1932)
Screenwriter
The Miracle Man (1932)
Dial
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1932)
Screenwriter
Love Me Tonight (1932)
Screenwriter
Once a Lady (1931)
Screenwriter
An American Tragedy (1931)
Screenwriter

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

An American Tragedy (1931) — (Movie Clip) We’ll Have To Be More Careful We’ve just learned that his near-forgotten employee-girlfriend is pregnant, as Clyde (Phillips Holmes), the poor-relation climber hired to a modest position at his wealthy uncle’s factory, joins his decidedly smitten and bold society flame Sondra (Frances Dee) at the lake, director Josef Von Sternberg working at Lake Arrowhead, San Bernardino National Forest, in the first feature from the Theodore Dreiser novel, An American Tragedy, 1931.
Laura (1944) - I'm A Natural Born Suspect Betrothed Shelby (Vincent Price), whom we've just met, and snooty columnist friend Waldo (Clifton Webb) are composed as they visit, with cop McPherson (Dana Andrews), the home of the murdered title character (Gene Tierney), with the famous theme introduced, in Otto Preminger's Laura, 1944.
Laura (1944) - She Had Something About Her Beginning his debriefing of cop McPherson (Dana Andrews) about his relations with the victim, prissy columnist Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb) describes his first meeting with the murdered title character (Gene Tierney), her first appearance on screen, in Otto Preminger's Laura, 1944.
Laura (1944) - Sharecroppers, No Doubt Columnist Waldo (Clifton Webb) spying on the murdered title character (Gene Tierney) in flashback, resuming narration for cop McPherson (Dana Andrews), moving on to her first meeting with Shelby (Vincent Price), facilitated by cook Louise (Kathleen Howard), in Otto Preminger's Laura, 1944.
Great Waltz, The (1938) - Johann Strauss II And His Immortal Melodies Opening MGM’s schmaltzy story of Strauss and Vienna, Fernand Gravet is introduced in the lead role, tangling with his employer (Sig Rumann), his in-laws to-be (Bert Roach, Greta Meyer) and his finaceè (Luiser Rainer), in The Great Waltz, 1938.
Great Waltz, The (1938) - The Performance Is Not Over! Johann Strauss (Fernand Gravet), in Vienna ca. 1849, leads his waltz orchestra, at the casino run by Donnmayer (Herman Bing), his fianceè (Luise Rainer) and family the only audience until opera stars Schiller (George Houston) and Donner, (Miliza Korjus, the Polish soprano in her only Hollywood film) arrive, in MGM’s The Great Waltz, 1938
Great Waltz, The (1938) - There'll Come A Time Carla Donner (a fictional character, played for MGM by Polish soprano Miliza Korjus) has introduced un-credentialed Johann Strauss II (Fernand Gravet) to Vienna society, the song a Strauss compositoin with an original lyric by Oscar Hammerstein II, in The Great Waltz, 1938.
Cluny Brown (1946) - She's Cold, Conceited And Callous At the cocktail party, we meet pre-War Londoners Betty (Helen Walker), Andrew (Peter Lawford) and John (Michael Dyne), lamenting Hitler, discovering Belinski (Charles Boyer), mistaking him for a famous professor and introducing a key misunderstanding in Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown, 1946.
Cluny Brown (1946) - I Know A Lot About Sinks Opening scene from Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown, 1946, features Hilary Ames (Reginald Gardner) describing his plumbing dilemma and the arrival of philospher Adam Belinski (Charles Boyer).
Cluny Brown (1946) - Why Girls Leave Home Cluny (Jennifer Jones) parts with Uncle Arn (Billy Bevan) for her new domestic service job then meets Colonel Duff-Graham (Sir C. Aubrey Smith) on the journey in Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown, 1946.
Cluny Brown (1946) - Shall We Have A Go At It? Provocative amateur plumber Cluny (Jennifer Jones) arrives to the delight of socialite Ames (Reginald Gardiner) and philosopher Belinski (Charles Boyer) in Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown, 1946.
Cluny Brown (1946) - I'm Going To Have A Puppy Lady Alice (Margaret Bannerman) and Sir Henry (Reginald Owen) mistake their new maid Cluny (Jennifer Jones) for a guest in Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown, 1946, from a Margery Sharp novel.

Bibliography