Winton Hoch


Director Of Photography

Biography

Lab technician who contributed to the development of Technicolor before going on to become one of Hollywood's premier color cinematographers. Hoch is best known for his collaborations with director John Ford.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Necromancy (1972)
Director of Photography
The Green Berets (1968)
Director of Photography
Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964)
Director of Photography
Five Weeks in a Balloon (1962)
Director of Photography
Sergeants 3 (1962)
Director of Photography
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961)
Director of Photography
The Lost World (1960)
Director of Photography
The Big Circus (1959)
Director of Photography
This Earth Is Mine (1959)
Director of Photography
The Young Land (1959)
Director of Photography
Jet Pilot (1957)
Director of Photography
The Searchers (1956)
Photography
Mister Roberts (1955)
Director of Photography
A Star Is Born (1954)
Director of Photography
The Redhead from Wyoming (1953)
Director of Photography
Return to Paradise (1953)
Director of Photography
The Quiet Man (1952)
Director of Photography
Bird of Paradise (1951)
Director of Photography
Halls of Montezuma (1951)
Director of Photography
The Sundowners (1950)
Director of Photography
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Director of Photography
3 Godfathers (1949)
Director of Photography
Tulsa (1949)
Director of Photography
So Dear to My Heart (1949)
Director of Photography
Melody Time (1948)
Live action Photographer
Tap Roots (1948)
Director of Photography
Captains of the Clouds (1942)
Aerial Photographer
The Reluctant Dragon (1941)
Technicolor seq Director of Photographer
Dive Bomber (1941)
Director of Photography
Dr. Cyclops (1940)
Associate [camera]
Sweethearts (1938)
1st Camera
Walter Wanger's Vogues of 1938 (1937)
Technicolor Camera chief of prod

Post Production (Feature Film)

Joan of Arc (1948)
Technicolor Photographer

Cinematography (Short)

Over the Andes (1943)
Cinematographer
Rural Hungary (1939)
Cinematographer
Glimpses of Austria (1938)
Cinematographer
Rural Sweden (1938)
Cinematographer
Czechoslovakia on Parade (1938)
Cinematographer
Natural Wonders of the West (1938)
Cinematographer
Glimpses of New Brunswick (1938)
Cinematographer
Beautiful Budapest (1938)
Cinematographer
Land of the Incas (1937)
Cinematographer
Colorful Bombay (1937)
Cinematographer
Copenhagen (1937)
Cinematographer
Serene Siam (1937)
Cinematographer
Hong Kong "The Hub of the Orient" (1937)
Cinematographer
Picturesque South Africa (1937)
Cinematographer
Chile "Land of Charm" (1937)
Cinematographer
Stockholm "Pride of Sweden" (1937)
Cinematographer
India on Parade (1937)
Cinematographer
Rocky Mountain Grandeur (1937)
Cinematographer
Glimpses of Java and Ceylon (1937)
Cinematographer
Glimpses of Peru (1937)
Cinematographer
St. Helena and its "Man of Destiny" (1936)
Cinematographer
Colorful Islands Madagascar and Seychelles (1936)
Cinematographer
Yellowstone Park "Nature's Playground" (1936)
Cinematographer
Victoria and Vancouver Gateways to Canada (1936)
Cinematographer
Quaint Quebec (1936)
Cinematographer
Rio de Janeiro "City of Splendour" (1936)
Cinematographer
Beautiful Banff and Lake Louise (1935)
Cinematographer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Searchers, The (1956) - Let's Go Home Significant SPOILER here in a landmark picture, Natalie Wood as the mature Debbie is rescued from five years captivity by her adoptive brother Marty (Jeffrey Hunter) from the Comanche chief Scar (Henry Brandon), as his partner Ethan (John Wayne), leading an attack with Rev. Clayton (Ward Bond), appears determined to execute her, in John Ford’s The Searchers, 1956.
Searchers, The (1956) - We've Seen Scalps Before Big reveal here as Mexican trader Figueroa (Antonio Moreno) leads the title characters (John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter as Ethan and Martin) to meet Comanche chief Scar (Henry Brandon), who is suspected of holding kidnapped Debbie (who’s grown up to be Natalie Wood), and who brandishes a medal long ago given to the girl, in John Ford’s celebrated Western The Searchers, 1956.
Mister Roberts (1955) - Disharmony Aboard This Ship Henry Fonda, who won the Tony on Broadway in the same title role, takes a startling, indecent dressing down from James Cagney (the always-nameless “Captain,”), standing up for his crew (Ken Curtis et al) and his right to seek a transfer, in Mister Roberts, 1955, from Joshua Logan’s play, from the book by Thomas Heggen.
Mister Roberts (1955) - Is That Your Battleship? Henry Fonda (title character) joined by Jack Lemmon (in his Best Supporting Actor award-winning role) as scalawag Ensign Pulver, who’s ashore on a ruse, to visit the nurses he and the crew have been ogling with binoculars, met by Betsy Palmer as Lt. Girard and her team, in the “safe area of the Pacific,” April, 1945, in Mister Roberts, 1955.
Searchers, The (1956) - My, The Days Are Getting Shorter Piercing scream from Lucy (Pippa Scott) confirms director John Ford has moved into horror movie territory, as the Edwards family (Walter Coy, Dorotny Jordan, Robert Lyden, and Lana Wood, young sister of Natalie) detects the arrival of the raiding party in The Searchers, 1956.
Quiet Man, The (1952) - Begin At The Beginning John Ford’s Academy Award-winning direction opens with John Wayne arriving in an imaginary Irish town, Ward Bond narrating, Paddy O’Donnell, Web Overlander and Eric Gorman with greetings until Barry FitzGerald intervenes, in The Quiet Man, 1952, co-starring Maureen O’Hara.
Quiet Man, The (1952) - A Bold One You Are! Winton Hoch’s photography supports director John Ford’s expression of operatic passions in pastoral Ireland, as American Thornton (John Wayne, title character), enters the old family home he’s just bought, finding fiery Mary Kate (Maureen O’Hara) engaged, in The Quiet Man, 1952.
Quiet Man, The (1952) - See Here Little Man! Dannaher (Victor McLaglen) throws a tantrum, interrupting Michaeleen (Barry FitzGerald) and Thornton (John Wayne), who’s about to buy his old family home from widow Tillane (Mildred Natwick), though his sister Mary Kate (Maureen O’Hara) doesn’t object, in John Ford’s The Quiet Man, 1952.
Quiet Man, The (1952) - It's Only A Mirage Michaeleen (Barry FitzGerald) conveys Thornton (John Wayne) to Innisfree, explaining to narrating Fr. Lonergan (Ward Bond) that the big American from Pittsburgh was born there, when Mary Kate (Maureen O’Hara) first appears, early in John Ford’s The Quiet Man, 1952.
Green Berets, The (1968) - He Keeps Score Captain Coleman (Jason Evers) receives officer Nim (George Takei) after a patrol, who's then introduced to the new commander York (John Wayne, who also co-directed) and McDaniels (Edward Faulkner), in the Vietnam combat drama The Green Berets, 1968.
So Dear To My Heart (1948) - The Greatest Wealth Narration and vocal by John Beal, song by Irving Taylor and Ticker Freeman, story-book opening by Disney animators including Ub Iwerks and Josh Meador, and a quick look at the leading lad, Bobby Driscoll as Jerry, in the 1948 adaptation of the book by Sterling North, So Dear To My Heart.
So Dear To My Heart (1948) - Black As A Lump Of Coal Jerry (Bobby Driscoll) and hardworking Granny (Beulah Bondi) check to see if the lambs have been born, on her Indiana farm, and we meet the black sheep who will become the boy’s true pet-project, in Walt Disney’s live-action plus animation feature So Dear To My Heart, 1948.

Trailer

Bibliography