Arthur Hiller


Director
Arthur Hiller

About

Also Known As
Alan Smithee
Birth Place
Edmonton, Alberta, CA
Born
November 22, 1923

Biography

Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller began in radio and, after a brief stint helming TV episodes in his homeland, moved to the USA where he quickly established himself directing both live and film series like "Playhouse 90" (CBS 1956-1960) "Gunsmoke" (CBS 1955-1975) and "Naked City" (ABC 1958-1963), for which he received a 1962 Emmy nomination. He made an auspicious feature debut at the ...

Family & Companions

Gwen Hiller
Wife
Married on February 14, 1948.

Notes

"Most startling of these gags, however, is an end-credits shot of Eszterhas and Arthur Hiller having a meal, with the latter asking the scribe, 'Why would you want me to direct?' We don't hear Eszterhas' answer." --from DAILY VARIETY review of "An Alan Smithee film: Burn, Hollywood Burn", October 3, 1997

Received honorary degree (L.H.D.) from London Institute of Applied Research in 1973

Biography

Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller began in radio and, after a brief stint helming TV episodes in his homeland, moved to the USA where he quickly established himself directing both live and film series like "Playhouse 90" (CBS 1956-1960) "Gunsmoke" (CBS 1955-1975) and "Naked City" (ABC 1958-1963), for which he received a 1962 Emmy nomination. He made an auspicious feature debut at the helm of the teen flick "The Careless Years" (1957), starring Dean Stockwell, but did not return to the big screen until 1963 with "Miracle of the White Stallions" and "The Wheeler Dealers." Although he worked in a variety of genres, from the dramatic "The Man in the Glass Booth" (1974) to the romantic "Love Story" (1970), Hiller showed his greatest facility with light comedy, working well with writers like Neil Simon ("The Out-of-Towners" 1970, "Plaza Suite" 1971), Andrew Bergman ("The In-Laws" 1979), Israel Horowitz ("Author! Author!" 1982) and Leslie Dixon ("Outrageous Fortune" 1987). However, two of his most acclaimed movies, "The Americanization of Emily" (1964) and the bleak satire "The Hospital" (1971), both scripted by Paddy Chayefsky, were notably dark films. No Hiller film did better at the box office than "Love Story," which was disparaged by many critics as sentimental and cloying, much as Erich Segal's best-selling novel had been. Hiller's late career was hampered by box-office duds like the gay-themed romantic drama "Making Love" (1982) and the Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor comedy "See No Evil, Hear No Evil" (1989). In an unfortunate case of life imitating art, Hiller and screenwriter Joe Eszterhas clashed during the filming of their film industry satire "An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn" (1997), leading the director to demand his name be taken off the final film, which was released to critical derision and commercial failure under the directorial pseudonym Alan Smithee. Hiller only directed one more film, the quickly forgotten comedy "National Lampoon's Pucked" (2006), starring rock icon Jon Bon Jovi. In addition to his work as a director, Hiller served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 1993 to 1997. Arthur Hiller died of undisclosed natural causes in Los Angeles on August 17, 2016 at the age of 92.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

National Lampoon's Pucked (2006)
Director
Burn, Hollywood, Burn (1997)
Director
Carpool (1996)
Director
The Babe (1992)
Director
Married To It (1991)
Director
Taking Care of Business (1990)
Director
See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989)
Director
Outrageous Fortune (1987)
Director
Teachers (1984)
Director
The Lonely Guy (1984)
Director
Romantic Comedy (1983)
Director
Author! Author! (1982)
Director
Making Love (1982)
Director
Nightwing (1979)
Director
The In-Laws (1979)
Director
Silver Streak (1976)
Director
W.C. Fields and Me (1976)
Director
The Man in the Glass Booth (1974)
Director
The Crazy World of Julius Vrooder (1974)
Director
Man of La Mancha (1972)
Director
Plaza Suite (1971)
Director
The Hospital (1971)
Director
Love Story (1970)
Director
The Out-of-Towners (1970)
Director
Popi (1969)
Director
The Tiger Makes Out (1967)
Director
Tobruk (1967)
Director
Promise Her Anything (1966)
Director
Penelope (1966)
Director
The Americanization of Emily (1964)
Director
Miracle of the White Stallions (1963)
Director
The Wheeler Dealers (1963)
Director
The Careless Years (1957)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Casting By (2013)
Lunch (2012)
Himself
Who is Norman Lloyd? (2007)
Himself
Lost in the Pershing Point Hotel (2000)
I Think I Cannes (1999)
Out of the Cold (1999)
The Land of the Free (1998)
Merchants of Venus (1997)
The Pitch (1996)
Himself
Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick (1995)
Himself
Beverly Hills Cop III (1994)
Roswell (1994)

Producer (Feature Film)

The Lonely Guy (1984)
Producer
The In-Laws (1979)
Producer
The Crazy World of Julius Vrooder (1974)
Producer
Man of La Mancha (1972)
Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

The Pitch (1996)
Other
Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick (1995)
Other
Terror in the Aisles (1984)
Other

Cast (Special)

Who Is Alan Smithee? (2002)
The O'Neals: The E! True Hollywood Story (2001)
Interviewee
Richard Pryor: Comic on the Edge (1996)

Cast (Short)

Action on the Beach (1964)
Himself

Life Events

1942

Served in Royal Canadian Air Force

1954

Started directing for CBC-Television

1957

First feature film, "The Careless Years"

1964

Collaborated with Paddy Chayefsky, directing his script, "The Americanization of Emily"

1970

Scored big hit with straightforward film adaptation of Erich Segal's novel "Love Story"; earned Best Director Academy Award nomination

1971

Reunited with Chayefsky, directing "The Hospital"

1974

Picked up co-producing credit on "The Crazy World of Julius Vrooder" (also directed)

1979

Directed and co-produced Peter Falk comedy "The In-Laws"

1984

Produced and directed "The Lonely Guy", starring Steve Martin and Charles Grodin

1987

Helmed "Outrageous Fortune", starring Bette Midler and Shelley Long

1992

Tackled baseball legend, directing "The Babe", a biopic of George Herman 'Babe' Ruth

1997

Took his name off "An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn"; director's credit going to Alan Smithee

Videos

Movie Clip

Love Story (1970) - It's A New World Location shooting in the Bronx to represent her Rhode Island hometown, Jenny (Ali McGraw) introduces her fiancè Oliver (Ryan O’Neal), of the famous and affluent Barrett family, to her baker father (whom she calls Phil, John Marley), who immediately thinks he can mend fences in his family, in Love Story, 1970, directed by Arthur Hiller.
Love Story (1970) - I Think You're Scared Shooting around Harvard Yard in rain and snow, a favorite sequence from Erich Segal’s script, directed by Arthur Hiller, and a milestone in the relations between affluent Oliver (Ryan O’Neal) and working-class Jenny (Ali MacGraw) in Love Story, 1970, which became the sixth highest-grossing picture ever made.
Love Story (1970) - Open, I'm Smart And Poor Gazing at the Wollman Rink in Central Park and reflecting, with the first use of the hit theme by Francis Lai, Ryan O’Neal as Harvard blue-blood Oliver Barrett IV recalls his first meeting with Jenny (Ali MacGraw), from the Erich Segal screenplay (which he also adapted into the top selling novel of the same year), in the box office smash Love Story, 1970, directed by Arthur Hiller.
Love Story (1970) - Never Say Love If You Don't Mean It Following their first date (at his hockey game), Radcliffe gal Jenny (Ali MacGraw) with Harvard man Oliver (Ryan O’Neal) who returns to join his roommates (including Tommy Lee Jones, one of author Erich Segal’s models for Oliver’s character), then chatting outside Harvard Stadium, in Love Story, 1970.
Love Story (1970) - What Is It Your People Are In? Driving his MG TC-Midget up to the doors of the Phipps Estate (Old Westbury, Long Island, NY) Oliver (Ryan O’Neal) guides his less-affluent de-facto fianceè Jenny, from Rhode Island and Radcliffe, through a first meeting with his parents, Ray Milland (appearing in a film without his hairpiece, for the first time) and Katharine Balfour, in Love Story, 1970.
Wheeler Dealers, The (1963) - Surprise Becomes You Wall Street firm boss Bear (Jim Backus) is setting up his token female stock analyst Molly Thatcher (Lee Remick) to fail so he can fire her when he gives her a new assignment, and she meets visiting Texan client Henry Tyroon (James Garner), in The Wheeler Dealers, 1963.
Wheeler Dealers, The (1963) - The Very Dear Pig Still not clear the extent to which Texan Henry (James Garner) is playing the rube, but plenty with New York stock analyst Molly (Lee Remick) and roommate (Patricia Crowley), before what's officially a business dinner, the Maitre'd (Marcel Hillaire) victimized, in producer Martin Ransohoff's The Wheeler Dealers, 1963.
Wheeler Dealers, The (1963) - I Don't Lose, Mr. Feinberg We don't quite know the game oil-man Henry Tyroon (James Garner) is playing, except that he's come from Texas to NYC to hustle up some funds, as he meets cabbie Feinberg (Robert Strauss) at then-Idlewild airport, early in The Wheeler Dealers, 1963, co-starring Lee Remick.
Man Of La Mancha (1972) - It's All The Same! Sophia Loren in her first scene as "Aldonza," the "serving wench," hard to imagine another actress doing better, with It's All The Same by Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion, her own vocal, in Alberto Grimaldi's production of Man Of La Mancha, 1972.
Man Of La Mancha (1972) - A Monstrous Giant Fully into their fictional roles for the first time, Peter O'Toole (as Don Quixote) and James Coco (as Sancho Panza) in their defining assault on a windmill, in Man Of La Mancha, 1972, directed by Arthur Hiller.
Man Of La Mancha (1972) - By Edict Of The Inquisition From the opening sequence, Spaniards mocking their masters, a masked prisoner is Peter O'Toole, here playing the author Cervantes, supported by manservant James Coco, from Alberto Grimaldi's 1972 production of the hit Broadway musical, Man Of La Mancha.
Americanization Of Emily, The (1964) - I Need A Girl An American navy fixer in London, Charlie (James Garner) with his new driver Emily (Julie Andrews), consults with friend Sheila (Liz Fraser), then makes an offer, in The Americanization Of Emily, 1964, from Paddy Chayefsky's screenplay.

Trailer

Promo

Family

Harry Hiller
Father
Rose Hiller
Mother
Henryk Hiller
Son
Erica Hiller
Daughter
Associate producer. Associate producer of father's "Married To It" (1991); married sound mixer Kevin Carpenter in July 1999.

Companions

Gwen Hiller
Wife
Married on February 14, 1948.

Bibliography

Notes

"Most startling of these gags, however, is an end-credits shot of Eszterhas and Arthur Hiller having a meal, with the latter asking the scribe, 'Why would you want me to direct?' We don't hear Eszterhas' answer." --from DAILY VARIETY review of "An Alan Smithee film: Burn, Hollywood Burn", October 3, 1997

Received honorary degree (L.H.D.) from London Institute of Applied Research in 1973

Received honorary degree from University of Toronto in 1995.