Buck Henry


Actor, Screenwriter
Buck Henry

About

Also Known As
Buck Henry Zuckerman
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
December 09, 1930

Biography

After limited success as a stage actor, writer Buck Henry established himself as a sketch writer and performer in 1960s television before writing scripts for some of cinema's most seminal films. Henry first found screen success on "The New Steve Allen Show" (ABC, 1961) and "That Was the Week That Was" (NBC, 1964-65) before joining forces with Mel Brooks to create "Get Smart" (NBC/CBS 196...

Family & Companions

Sally Henry
Wife
Met Henry when she was working as Mike Nichols' secretary.

Biography

After limited success as a stage actor, writer Buck Henry established himself as a sketch writer and performer in 1960s television before writing scripts for some of cinema's most seminal films. Henry first found screen success on "The New Steve Allen Show" (ABC, 1961) and "That Was the Week That Was" (NBC, 1964-65) before joining forces with Mel Brooks to create "Get Smart" (NBC/CBS 1965-1970), the popular and Emmy Award-winning screwball sitcom that lived a long fruitful life in syndication for generations. During the spy comedy's run, Henry wrote the script for Mike Nichols' iconic film, "The Graduate" (1967), which earned him his first Academy Award nomination. He continued to pen engaging films like "Catch-22" (1970) and "What's Up Doc?" (1972), while directing Warren Beatty in "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), only to find himself slipping with the unwatchable "First Family" (1980) and the routine Goldie Hawn comedy, "Protocol" (1984). Henry shifted focus from putting pen to paper in order to concentrate on performing, which included hosting "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ) over 10 times, while serving as a rotating host for the failed late night talker, "The Late Show" (NBC, 1984), and a recurring stint on "Falcon Crest" (CBS, 1981-1990). Henry regained his stature as one of Hollywood's top screenwriters with "To Die For" (1995), only to get pulled into the disaster known as "Town & Country" (2001), which showed that his career had as many moments of sharp disappointment as it did of unadulterated genius.

Born on Dec. 9, 1930 in New York City, Henry was raised by his father, Paul Zuckerman, an Air Force general and stockbroker, and his mother, Ruth Taylor, a former silent film actress who starred as Lorelei Lee in the silent version of "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1928), among other films. Having been introduced to Broadway plays by his parents when he was four years old, Henry became interested in the performing arts at an early age. At 15 years old, while attending the then-all boys Choate School, he made his professional acting debut in a Broadway production of "Life with Father," which a year later went on a tour of theaters in Brooklyn, Long Island and the Bronx. After his schooling at Choate, Henry earned his bachelor's degree in English literature, a senior fellowship in writing, and a spot writing for the university's humor magazine, the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern. Following his graduation, he joined the Army during the Korean War, though instead of seeing action, he toured Germany with the Seventh Army Repertory Company performing in a play he also wrote and directed.

While living hand-to-mouth in Manhattan, Henry's life took a fortuitous turn after he joined the Premise, an improvisational group that performed in the West Village. Thanks to the troupe's popularity, Henry became a cast member of "The New Steve Allen Show" (ABC, 1961), which led to landing an agent and appearing on "The Garry Moore Show" (CBS, 1950-1967). Following his short stint with Moore, Henry was a writer and performer on "That Was the Week That Was" (NBC, 1964-65), a satirical sketch program based on a BBC show that also served as a precursor to the more famous and long-running "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ). Going from writer and performer to show creator, Henry made what may well have been his most lasting contribution to pop culture when he created along with Mel Brooks the Emmy Award-winning sitcom, "Get Smart" (NBC/CBS 1965-1970), which featured Don Adams as Maxwell Smart, a bumbling spy barely tolerated by his cranky Chief (Edward Platt) and often aided by the more competent Agent 99 (Barbara Feldon). Known for its off-beat characters and gag gadgets, like Smart's shoe phone and the frustrating Cone of Silence, "Get Smart" lived a long life in syndication while spawning several movies, including a big budget remake in 2008 starring Steve Carell and Anne Hathaway.

Branching out on his own, Henry was the sole creator of "Captain Nice" (NBC, 1967), a short-lived sitcom about a mild-mannered chemist (William Daniels) who becomes a mild-mannered superhero in a pajama costume knit by his mother. Despite the show's short stay on the air, Henry's fans long remembered the goofy comedy. Also that year, he made an auspicious feature debut as a screenwriter with "The Graduate" (1967), the iconic comedy-drama about an adrift college graduate (Dustin Hoffman) who engages in a May-December affair with family friend Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft), only to find himself falling in love with her daughter (Katharine Ross). Aside from being a big box office hit, "The Graduate" spoke to the members of a disaffected generation by giving life to otherwise inchoate feelings of alienation and frustration. Ably performed by Hoffman, Bancroft and Ross, and scored by Paul Simon, it became one of the seminal films of the late 1960s alongside "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967) and "Easy Rider" (1969), ushering in a cycle of youth-oriented motion pictures that rejuvenated a moribund American film industry hurt by the splintering of the studio system. "The Graduate" also earned several Academy Award nominations, including one for Henry - who made a cameo appearance as a hotel clerk in the film - for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Sticking to the big screen, Henry adapted "Candy" (1968), Terry Southern's sex farce about an innocent young woman (Ewa Aulin) who is completely unaware of her own sexual power. Following a small role in the World War II comedy "The Secret War of Harry Frigg" (1968), he teamed with "Graduate" director Mike Nichols to write "Catch-22" (1970), an uneven adaptation of Joseph Heller's satirical look at the absurdity of armed conflict as seen through the eyes of a war-weary bombardier (Alan Arkin). Henry made an appearance as the sadistic and humorless Lieutenant Colonel Korn. After writing the Barbra Streisand vehicle "The Owl and the Pussycat" (1970), he had a starring role as Dr. Manos in "Is There Sex After Death?" (1971), a satirical sex comedy about the making of a documentary about sex. Also that year, Henry co-starred in Milos Foreman's American debut, "Taking Off" (1971), a comedy-drama about two parents (Henry and Lynn Carlin) who resort to smoking pot while searching the East Village for their runaway daughter (Linnea Heacock). Returning to his natural forte, Henry wrote the script for "What's Up Doc?" (1972), Peter Bogdonovich's screwball comedy about four identical plaid overnight bags and the four owners (Ryan O'Neal, Barbra Streisand, Mabel Albertson and Michael Murphy) who get them mixed up.

Turning to the more unfamiliar territory of political thriller, Henry adapted "The Day of the Dolphin" (1973) for director Mike Nichols, which depicted a group of dolphins who help a brilliant scientist (George C. Scott) foil a plot to assassinate the president. Meanwhile, Henry began hosting "Saturday Night Live," appearing on the show 10 times from 1976-1980 - a record that was later surpassed by Steve Martin. Over the four years, he became kind of an honorary cast member, playing a variety of recurring characters, including a sadistic stunt coordinator, a pedophilic babysitter and a frequent costumer to a deli operated by a crazed Samurai (John Belushi) - the latter of which led to Henry receiving a head injury on live TV thanks to Belushi's wild chopping with his samurai sword. Back on the big screen, Henry co-starred opposite David Bowie in "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (1976), which he followed with his debut as both a producer and director with "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), which starred Warren Beatty as the star quarterback of the Los Angeles Rams, who dies on the verge of playing the Super Bowl, but receives a new chance on life when he occupies the body of an about-to-be-murdered businessman. Meanwhile, he went back to creating television with the sci-fi comedy "Quark" (NBC, 1978), which failed to duplicate his early success in the medium.

As he entered into the next decade, Henry's writing declined drastically, both in quantity, and in the eye of some critics, in quality as well. The first sign of trouble came when he was the sole writer and director of the poorly received feature satire, "First Family" (1980), which cast Bob Newhart as a bumbling president, Madeline Kahn as his alcoholic wife and Gilda Radner as their oversexed daughter. After a small part in John Cassavetes' "Gloria" (1980), he was credited for creating the characters for "The Nude Bomb" (1980), a film version of "Get Smart" that saw Maxwell Smart (Adams) try to save the world from a bomb that will destroy all of mankind's clothing. He returned to the silver screen as the writer of "Protocol" (1984), an average-at-best comedy about a cocktail waitress (Goldie Hawn) who saves the life of a foreign dignitary (Richard Romanus), which leads to landing a job in the protocol department of the government. He later became a writer and cast member of "The New Show" (NBC, 1984), a failed attempt by "SNL" producer Lorne Michaels to bring a variety show to primetime.

While his screenwriting career began to wane, Henry's career as a character actor thrived. He began serving as a rotating host on "The Late Show" (Fox, 1986-88), the first-ever show produced by then-fledgling network, FOX, while also appearing in a three-episode arc on the popular primetime soap, "Falcon Crest" (CBS, 1981-1990). After playing the kindly priest who runs the mission at the local leper colony in "Tune in Tomorrow" (1990), he appeared as himself in Robert Altman's "The Player" (1992) during the film's opening sequence, where Henry pitches a sequel to "The Graduate" to studio executive Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins). Allegedly, the scene sparked real, but fleeting Hollywood interest in a "Graduate" sequel. Following a brief amusing turn as a dedicated weekend fisherman in "Short Cuts" (1993) and a small role in Gus Van Sant's rather dull road comedy "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues" (1994), Henry made a triumphant return to screenwriting with a well-received adaptation of Joyce Maynard's novel, "To Die For" (1995), a hard-edged satire on the nature of American celebrity. Starring Nicole Kidman as a beautiful, well-spoken woman fancying herself as an on-the-cusp news anchorwoman who will do anything - including killing her in-the-way husband (Matt Dillon) - in order to get famous.

Henry's return to screenwriting prominence was short-lived following roles in the romantic comedy "The Real Blonde" (1997), the drama about a dysfunctional Los Angeles Family, "I'm Losing You" (1998), and the failed adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut's classic "Breakfast of Champions" (1999), starring Bruce Willis. He wrote pages for the reshoot "Town & Country" (2001), after the original production wrapped amidst various problems, chief among them countless takes demanded by star Warren Betty. A disaster from start to finish, "Town & Country" - a lame attempt at making a screwball comedy - cost studio New Line Cinema to lose over $100 million. Ever since that debacle, Henry basically steered clear of writing for the screen in favor of acting. After appearing opposite Matthew Broderick and Alec Baldwin in the Hollywood satire "The Last Shot" (2004), Henry logged episodes of "Will & Grace" (NBC, 1998-2006) and "30 Rock" (NBC, 2006-13). Turning to the theater, he appeared with Holland Taylor in an off-off-Broadway production of Lisa Ebersole's "Mother" (2009), which rekindled his love affair for playing in the small older theaters of his early career.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

First Family (1980)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Casting By (2013)
A Fuller Life (2013)
Himself
It Came From Kuchar (2009)
Get Smart (2008)
American Swing (2008)
Himself
Pierre Rissient: Man of Cinema (2007)
The Last Shot (2004)
Town & Country (2001)
Breakfast of Champions (1999)
Curtain Call (1998)
The Story of X (1998)
Narrator
I'm Losing You (1998)
The Real Blonde (1997)
1999 (1997)
Mr Goldman
To Die For (1995)
Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron (1995)
Shotgun Freeway: Drives Thru Lost L.A. (1995)
Himself
Grumpy Old Men (1993)
Elliott Snyder
Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993)
Short Cuts (1993)
Gordon Johnson
Keep the Change (1992)
Mastergate (1992)
The Player (1992)
Himself
The Lounge People (1991)
The Linguini Incident (1991)
Cecil
Defending Your Life (1991)
Tune In Tomorrow (1990)
Rude Awakening (1989)
Dark Before Dawn (1988)
Charlie Stevens
Aria (1988)
Eating Raoul (1982)
Mr Leech
Gloria (1980)
First Family (1980)
Old Boyfriends (1979)
Art Kopple
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
Taking Off (1971)
Larry Tyne
Is There Sex After Death (1971)
Catch-22 (1970)
Lieutenant Colonel Korn
The Owl and the Pussycat (1970)
Man looking through Doubleday bookstore
The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968)
Stockade commandant
The Graduate (1967)
Room clerk
The Troublemaker (1964)
T. R. Kingston

Writer (Feature Film)

The Humbling (2014)
Screenplay
Get Smart's Bruce and Lloyd: Out of Control (2008)
Source Material
Get Smart (2008)
Source Material
Town & Country (2001)
Screenplay
To Die For (1995)
Screenplay
I Love N.Y. (1988)
Screenplay
Protocol (1984)
Screenplay
The Nude Bomb (1980)
Characters As Source Material
First Family (1980)
Screenplay
The Day of the Dolphin (1973)
Screenplay
What's Up, Doc? (1972)
Screenwriter
Catch-22 (1970)
Screenwriter
The Owl and the Pussycat (1970)
Screenwriter
Candy (1968)
Screenwriter
The Graduate (1967)
Screenwriter
The Troublemaker (1964)
Story
The Troublemaker (1964)
Screenwriter

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

American Swing (2008)
Other
Get Smart (2008)
Consultant
Lisa Picard Is Famous (2000)
Other
Shotgun Freeway: Drives Thru Lost L.A. (1995)
Other
The Player (1992)
Other
Get Smart, Again! (1989)
Other

Director (Special)

Hunger Chic (1989)
Director

Cast (Special)

AFI's 100 Years... 100 Laughs (2000)
15th Annual IFP/West Independent Spirit Awards (2000)
Luck, Trust & Ketchup: Robert Altman in Carver Country (1994)
Himself
Laughing Matters (1993)
Beauty Rest (1992)
Indecision '92: The Democratic National Convention (1992)
The Republic Pictures Story (1991)
Independent Spirit Awards (1991)
The Secret Life of 118 Green Street (1990)
Narrator
Edge (1990)
Saturday Night Live 15th Anniversary (1989)
Hunger Chic (1989)
The Man On Tv
Playboy's 25th Anniversary Celebration (1979)
That Was the Year That Was (1976)
Host
The George Segal Show (1974)
A Last Laugh at the 60's (1970)

Writer (Special)

The 74th Annual Academy Awards (2002)
Writer
That Was the Year That Was (1976)
Writer

Special Thanks (Special)

The 74th Annual Academy Awards (2002)
Writer
That Was the Year That Was (1976)
Writer

Misc. Crew (Special)

Luck, Trust & Ketchup: Robert Altman in Carver Country (1994)
Other

Life Events

1947

Broadway acting debut at age 16 in a minor role in "Life with Father"

1948

Acted in the touring company of "Life with Father"

1952

Served in the U.S. Army; during the Korean conflict toured Germany with the Seventh Army Repertory Company in a musical comedy that he wrote, directed and starred in

1954

Returned to civilian life

1960

Joined the off-Broadway improvisational theater company "The Premise"

1960

Moved to Hollywood (date approximate)

1961

Became a regular performer on the final season of "The Steve Allen Show"

1964

Feature debut, co-wrote story, co-scripted (with director Theodore J. Flicker) and acted in "The Troublemaker"

1964

Wrote for and appeared as a regular on "That Was the Week That Was" (NBC), a well-received American version of the classic British political satire series

1965

Breakthrough TV credit, co-created with Mel Brooks, scripted episodes and served two years (1965-67) as story editor on "Get Smart!" (NBC, CBS), the extremely popular spy spoof series starring Don Adams as Maxwell Smart and Barbara Feldon as Agent 99

1966

Co-scripted the ABC special "The World of Mike Nichols"

1967

Breakthrough screenwriting credit, co-scripted (with Calder Willingham) "The Graduate"; first collaboration with director Mike Nichols; garnered an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay Adaptation

1967

TV producing debut, executive produced, created and wrote episodes of "Captain Nice", an NBC superhero spoof

1975

Reteamed with Mel Brooks to create "When Things Were Rotten," a short-lived spoof of Robin Hood on ABC

1976

Hosted and wrote for "That Was the Year That Was," an NBC special that satirically reviewed 1976

1978

Debut as film director and producer with "Heaven Can Wait" (with Warren Beatty), received an Oscar nomination for Best Direction

1978

Created "Quark," a short-lived sci-fi spoof starring Richard Benjamin on NBC

1980

Received a "from characters" credit on "The Nude Bomb," a feature version of "Get Smart!"

1980

First feature credit as sole screenwriter and sole director, "First Family"

1984

Became a writer and cast member of "The New Show" (NBC), producer Lorne Michaels' failed attempt to create a "Saturday Night Live"-like primetime show

1985

Wrote and acted in "Wake Me When I'm Dead," an episode of the 1985-86 revival of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (NBC)

1987

Appeared as a recurring character on three episodes of "Falcon Crest" (CBS), the popular primetime soap

1987

Served as a rotating host on "The Late Show," a late night talk show (and the first series produced for Fox)

1987

Last screenwriting credit for eight years, "I Love N.Y."

1991

Appeared as a correspondent on "Edge," a monthly magazine series covering American pop culture on PBS

1991

Served as Master of Ceremonies for the "10th Annual Independent Spirit Awards"

1992

Appeared in a cameo role as himself in Robert Altman's "The Player"

1993

Acted in Altman's "Short Cuts"; also featured in "Grumpy Old Men"

1994

Had a role in Gus Van Sant's misfire "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues"

1995

Wrote the screenplay for Van Sant's "To Die For"; acted in a supporting role

1997

Featured in "The Real Blonde"

1999

Starred on Broadway in "Art"

1999

Acted in the independent features "I'm Losing You" and "Breakfast of Champions"

1999

Voiced the character of Dadbert on an episode of the UPN animated series "Dilbert"

2000

Featured in Griffin Dunne's "Famous"; screened at Cannes

2001

Co-wrote the comedy feature "Town & Country," starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton as a couple with a troubled marriage; also acted

2004

Cast opposite Matthew Broderick and Alec Baldwin in the comedy "The Last Shot"

2005

Guest starred on "Will & Grace" (NBC)

2007

Landed a recurring guest appearance on "30 Rock" (NBC) as Liz Lemon's (Tina Fey) father Dick

2008

Credited with creating the characters for the feature film remake of "Get Smart," starring Steve Carell as Maxwell Smart and Anne Hathaway as Agent 99

2009

Starred off-Broadway opposite Holland Taylor in "Mother," a play by Lisa Ebersole

2011

Cast as Elka's (Betty White) love interest on TV Land sitcom "Hot in Cleveland"

Videos

Movie Clip

Owl And The Pussycat, The (1970) - Sit On Your Tire Director Herbert Ross, from Bill Manhoff’s play and Buck Henry’s screenplay, introduces his two leads, first Barbara Streisand as Manhattan streetwalker Doris, sheltering under the New York Post, and George Segal as bookworm Felix, toting Henry James, in The Owl And The Pussycat, 1970, Jacques Sanduescu their super.
Owl And The Pussycat, The (1970) - What's Your Last Name? Still on their epic first night together, both thrown out of the same building, now in his friend’s apartment, after their improbable tryst, bookworm Felix (George Segal) and hooker Doris (Barbra Streisand) find a whole new range of topics to argue, in The Owl And The Pussycat, 1970, from the Bill Manhoff play.
Owl And The Pussycat, The (1970) - You Rat Fink Fruitcake! First meeting between the principals, neighbors in the same apartment, after aspiring novelist Felix (George Segal) has called the management to alert them that Doris (Barbra Streisand) appears to be transacting prostitution, seen through his window, early in director Herbert Ross’ The Owl And The Pussycat, 1970.
What's Up, Doc? (1972) - I Don't Think Of You As A Woman In San Francisco for the musicology convention, Howard (Ryan O’Neal) from Iowa prepares with his fianceè Eunice (Madeline Kahn) to meet the philanthropist offering a big research grant, Peter Bogdanovich directing from the screenplay by Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton, in What’s Up, Doc?, 1972, starring Barbra Streisand.
What's Up, Doc? (1972) - We've Almost Got That Stammer Cured Already detained by rival Simon (Kenneth Mars), panicked musicologist Howard (Ryan O’Neal) meets Larrabee (Austin Pendleton), provider of the grant for-which they’re competing then, aided by Randy Quaid, finds mischievous Judy (Barbra Streisand) impersonating his fianceè, in What’s Up Doc, 1972.
What's Up, Doc? -- (1972) -- (Original Trailer) Director Peter Bogdanovich joins stars Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal for this full-on tongue in cheek trailer for the 1972 comedy hit What's Up, Doc?, also the feature debut of Madeline Kahn.
What's Up, Doc? (1972) - There Was A Plaid Overnight Case Opening with the storybook from the screenplay by Buck Henry, Robert Benton and David Newman, we meet Michael Murphy, followed by Phil Roth, then Ryan O’Neal and Madeline Kahn at San Francisco International, then Barbra Streisand, apparently by happenstance, in Peter Bodganovich’s hit rom-com, What’s Up, Doc?, 1972.
What's Up, Doc? (1972) - As Time Goes By Baffled musicologist Howard (Ryan O’Neal), ejected from his San Francisco hotel for hijinks the night before, winds up on the roof, and meets the perpetrator, the still-sexier Judy (Barbra Streisand), who has news about his grant, director Peter Bogdanovich with a big wink to Casablanca, in What’s Up Doc, 1972.
What's Up, Doc? (1972) - He Falls Down A Lot Sent by his bossy fianceè to fetch aspirin at the San Francisco hotel, nerdy musicologist Howard (Ryan O’Neal) has his first in-person encounter with Judy (Barbra Streisand), though we’ve no idea why she’s interested, early in Peter Bogdanovich’s What’s Up Doc, 1972.
First Family (1980) - Meet A Nice Tall Average Blonde Guy First scene for Madeline Kahn as first lady Constance Link, with Gilda Radner as daughter Gloria, who’s just been thwarted by the Secret Service in what is apparently one of many inept attempts at a tryst, in writer-director Buck Henry’s First Family, 1980, starring Bob Newhart as the president.
First Family (1980) - Not Fit To Suck On My Hat Very much a set piece, in the first scene for Harvey Korman as the American U.N. Ambassador, Maurice Sherbanee the Arab delegate, Bruce Kimmel the translator, writer-director Buck Henry romping, in his little-noticed political comedy First Family, 1980.
First Family (1980) - The President Is Not A Depraved Half-Wit Opening with Bob Newhart as president Manfred Link delivering a State Of The Union address, though from the oval office, William Sylvester the TV commentator, Roger Bowen the senator, Gilda Radner, whom we’ll learn is the president’s daughter, busted by the Secret Service, in writer-director Buck Henry’s First Family, 1980.

Trailer

Family

Ruth Taylor
Mother
Actor. Began as a Mack Sennett Bathing Beauty in comedy shorts; later played Lorelei Lee in the first screen adaptation of Anita Loos' "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1928).
Paul Zuckerman
Father
Air Force general, stockbroker.

Companions

Sally Henry
Wife
Met Henry when she was working as Mike Nichols' secretary.

Bibliography