Edmund L. Hartmann


Biography

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

The Sword of Ali Baba (1965)
Screenwriter
The Sword of Ali Baba (1965)
Story
Casanova's Big Night (1954)
Written for Screen by
Here Come the Girls (1953)
Screenwriter
The Caddy (1953)
Screenwriter
Here Come the Girls (1953)
Story
The Lemon Drop Kid (1951)
Screenwriter
My Favorite Spy (1951)
Screenwriter
Fancy Pants (1950)
Screenwriter
Sorrowful Jones (1949)
Screenwriter
The Paleface (1948)
Original Screenplay
Let's Live a Little (1948)
Screenwriter
Variety Girl (1947)
Original Screenplay
The Face of Marble (1946)
Original Story
The Naughty Nineties (1945)
Original Screenplay
Sudan (1945)
Original Screenplay
See My Lawyer (1945)
Screenwriter
Here Come the Co-Eds (1945)
Based on an Original story
Dangerous Partners (1945)
Adaptation
Ghost Catchers (1944)
Writer
The Scarlet Claw (1944)
Screenwriter
Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944)
Wrt for the Screenplay by
In Society (1944)
Screenwriter
Rhythm of the Islands (1943)
Additional Dialogue
Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1943)
Screenwriter
Hi' Ya, Chum (1943)
Original Screenplay
Lady Bodyguard (1943)
Screenwriter
Ride 'Em Cowboy (1942)
Original Story
Arabian Nights (1942)
Contr to dial and Special seq
True to the Army (1942)
Adaptation
San Francisco Docks (1941)
Original Screenplay
The Feminine Touch (1941)
Original Screenplay
Sweetheart of the Campus (1941)
Screenwriter
Keep 'Em Flying (1941)
Original Story
Diamond Frontier (1940)
Original Screenplay
Ma, He's Making Eyes at Me (1940)
Screenwriter
Black Friday (1940)
Contr to Screenplay const
South to Karanga (1940)
Original Screenplay
Enemy Agent (1940)
Screenwriter
Ex-Champ (1939)
Screenwriter
Two Bright Boys (1939)
Original Screenplay
Beauty for the Asking (1939)
Story
The Last Warning (1939)
Screenwriter
Big Town Czar (1939)
Screenwriter
Law of the Underworld (1938)
Screenwriter
The Last Express (1938)
Screenwriter
The Man Who Found Himself (1937)
Screenwriter
Hideaway (1937)
Screenwriter
Behind the Headlines (1937)
Screenwriter
China Passage (1937)
Screenwriter
Don't Get Personal (1936)
Story
The Big Noise (1936)
Story
Without Orders (1936)
Screenwriter
Wanted! Jane Turner (1936)
Screenwriter
Spring Tonic (1935)
Contr to trmt
Redheads on Parade (1935)
Contr to trmt
Helldorado (1934)
Contr on Special seq
Marie Galante (1934)
Contract Writer

Producer (Feature Film)

The Naughty Nineties (1945)
Producer
See My Lawyer (1945)
Producer
Ghost Catchers (1944)
Producer
In Society (1944)
Producer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Lemon Drop Kid, The (1951) - Damon Runyon Wrote Joining the prologue, citing Damon Runyon and meeting Bob Hope, title character, a.k.a. Sidney Milburn, hustling two greenhorns (Oliver Blake, Billie Bird) at a Florida track, the remake of the 1934 Lee Tracy version, The Lemon Drop Kid, 1951, also starring Jane Darwell and Lloyd Nolan.
Time Out For Rhythm (1941) - The Boogie-Woogie Man Quite the novelty number, after a time-lapse montage in which Rudy Vallee and Richard Lane have become big-time agents, a number sung by Pee Wee Hunt, with the Glen Gray (Casa Loma) Band, composition by Sammy Cahn and Saul Chaplin, Franz/Frank Planer on camera but no credit for special or photographic effects, in the Columbia variety vehicle Time Out For Rhythm, 1941.
Time Out For Rhythm (1941) - A-Twiddlin' My Thumbs Ann Miller, first-billed among many in a Columbia variety feature, crushes a Sammy Cahn-Saul Chaplin tune, dance by LeRoy Prinz, as the maid for a singer that agents Rudy Vallee and Allen Jenkins hope to lure back, in B>Time Out For Rhythm, 1941.
Feminine Touch, The (1941) - If Gorillas Had Puppies Jock Rubberlegs (Gordon Jones), growing a beard with the rest of the football team, has seized the opportunity to pick up Julie Hathaway (Rosalind Russell), pretty wife of his professor John (Don Ameche), who was summoned by the dean, and who’s writing a book on jealousy, early in The Feminine Touch, 1941.
Feminine Touch, The (1941) - He Can't Help Being Smart Professor John Hathaway (Don Ameche), who lost his job for refusing to give passing grades to athletes, and his wife Julie (Rosalind Russell) arrive at a New York publishing house to pitch his scholarly book on jealousy, and meet Kay Francis as the eager Miss Woods, in The Feminine Touch, 1941.
Feminine Touch, The (1941) - I Adore Difficult Women At a New York literary party, Julie (Rosalind Russell) is turning heads, approached by Sidney Blackmer, Henry Daniell and Van Heflin as publisher and host Morgan, who’s considering a book about jealousy, offered by her ex-professor husband John (Don Ameche), in The Feminine Touch, 1941.
Caddy, The (1953) - Let Mr. Hogan Shoot Part of the Jerry Lewis back-story, he’s San Francisco department store employee Harvey, who would be a golfer but for bad nerves, with girlfriend Lisa (Barbara Bates), meeting the real Ben Hogan, then his furious boss (Fred Clark), in the seventh Martin and Lewis star vehicle, The Caddy, 1953.
Caddy, The (1953) - I Get My Harpoon Gun! We’ve just learned that semi-hapless Harvey (Jerry Lewis) rents a room from the parents of his girlfriend Lisa (Barbara Bates), just gone to bed when her handsome but aimless brother Joe (Dean Martin) returns to San Francisco, thus their character’s first meeting, in The Caddy, 1953.
Caddy, The (1953) - That's Amore The very first staging of Dean Martin’s colossal hit and enduring signature song, by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks, at a San Francisco Italian birthday party for his character Joe, with his buddy (Jerry Lewis as “Harvey”) joining, though he didn’t on the record, in Paramount’s The Caddy, 1953.
Caddy, The (1953) - Anthony And Miller The opening device has Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis playing themselves, re-named Joe Anthony and Harvey Miller, a musical-comedy duo headlining the Paramount Theater in Times Square, song by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks, in their seventh feature as top-billed stars, from Paramount, The Caddy, 1953.
Face Of Marble, The (1946) - We Have Conquered Joining first scene for Dr. Randolph (John Carradine) and Cochran (Robert Shayne), who’ve found a body (Clark Kuney) near their coastal lab, revealing their well-intended mission, though the doc’s wife (Claudia Drake) seems worried, in the Monogram programmer The Face Of Marble, 1946.
Face Of Marble, The (1946) - Severe Brain Injury Happy cop Norton (Thomas E. Jackson) provides exposition on Elaine (Claudia Drake), wife of the scientist (not-seen John Carradine) he’s come to visit, as we learn that maid Maria (Rosa Rey) was behind the voodoo item delivered to assistant Cochran (Robert Shayne), in Face Of Marble, 1946.

Bibliography