Guy Hamilton


Director
Guy Hamilton

About

Birth Place
Paris, FR
Born
September 16, 1922

Biography

Born and raised in France, British director Guy Harrison learned his craft as an assistant director apprenticing with the likes of Julien Duvivier ("Anna Karenina" 1948), Carol Reed ("The Fallen Idol" 1948, "Outcast of the Islands" 1951), Orson Welles ("The Third Man" 1949) and John Huston ("The African Queen" 1951). A competent craftsman, he showed early promise with "Manuela/The The St...

Family & Companions

Naomi Chance
Wife
Actor.
Kerima
Wife
Actor. Starred in "An Outcast of the Islands".

Biography

Born and raised in France, British director Guy Harrison learned his craft as an assistant director apprenticing with the likes of Julien Duvivier ("Anna Karenina" 1948), Carol Reed ("The Fallen Idol" 1948, "Outcast of the Islands" 1951), Orson Welles ("The Third Man" 1949) and John Huston ("The African Queen" 1951). A competent craftsman, he showed early promise with "Manuela/The The Stowaway Girl" (1957) and "A Touch of Larceny" (1961), both of which he co-scripted. But time revealed him to be at his best with spy movies such as the underrated "Funeral in Berlin" (1966) and his four James Bond pictures. Hamilton helmed the superb "Goldfinger" (1964) and reteamed with Sean Connery's Bond for "Diamonds Are Forever" (1971). In 1973 and 1974, he guided Roger Moore through his paces in Moore's first attempts at playing 007 in "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun." Hamilton's work in the series demonstrated clearly the director's economy and cynical wit. Following his Bond run, he tackled Agatha Christie, directing two adaptations, "The Mirror Crack'd" (1980), set in contemporary times and featuring Angela Lansbury as Miss Marple, and the period Hercule Poirot mystery "Evil Under the Sun" (1982), which featured dazzling Egyptian locations. Hamilton returned to the action genre with the pleasant, if derivative, "Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins..." (1985), with Fred Ward. For the first time in close to three decades, he co-wrote the script for his final directing project (to date), the comedy "Sauf votre respect/Try This One for Size" (1989).

Life Events

1939

Apprenticed at Victorine Studios in Nice

1940

First credit, as fourth asssitant director on Julien Duvivier's "Untel pere et fils/The Heart of a Nation"

1940

Served in Royal Navy during WWII

1948

Reteamed with Duvivier as assistant director for Venetian location scenes of "Anna Karenina"

1948

Was assistant director to Carol Reed on "The Fallen Idol"

1950

Served as Orson Welles' AD on "The Third Man"

1951

Assisted John Huston on "The African Queen" and Reed on "Outcast of the Islands"

1952

Feature directing debut, "The Ringer"

1955

First screenplay credit, "The Colditz Story"; also directed

1957

Directed and co-scripted "Manuela", presenting a more penetrating view of sexual attraction than the British cinema usually allowed

1959

Took over "The Devil's Disciple" on short notice from Alexander Mackendrick

1961

Scored with ingenious comedy, "A Touch of Larceny"

1964

Helmed first James Bond film, "Goldfinger"

1971

Directed Sean Connery's return to Bond in "Diamonds Are Forver"

1973

Helmed first of Roger Moore's bond films "Live and Let Die"

1974

Fourth and last Bond picture, "The Man with the Golden Gun"

1980

First of two Agatha Christie adaptations, "The Mirror Crack'd", featuring Angela Lansbury as Miss Marple

1982

Helmed an all-star cast in "Evil Under the Sun", adapted from a Christie Hercule Poirot novel

1985

Directed "Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins...", a bubble-gum action-adventure yarn based on the popular "Destroyer" books by Richard Sapir and Warren Murphy

1989

Last feature to date, "Try This One For Size"

Videos

Movie Clip

Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Who Is Your Floor? In Amsterdam, James Bond (Sean Connery), pretending to be jewel smuggler Peter Franks, engages the real one (Joe Robinson) in a muscular brawl in an elevator, with Tiffany (Jill St. John), whom we believe is buying his subterfuge, observing in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Goldfinger (1964) - Personal Vendetta Back at HQ, Bond (Sean Connery) tells "M" (Bernard Lee) about the killing of Jill Masterson, confirms he's up for the job, then does customary banter with Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) in Goldfinger, 1964.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Nothing About My Future? Entering a Harlem restaurant (called “Fillet Of Soul”) gently pursuing possible cohorts of a suspicious Caribbean dictator, James Bond (Roger Moore) is snatched, meeting soothsayer Solitare (Jane Seymour), goon Tee Hee (Julius Harris), and the gangster “Mr. Big,” early in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Did You Mess With That? SPOILER here in Yaphet Kotto’s Bond-villain performance, captured Bond (Roger Moore) is interrogated by Mr. Big, who wants to know whether he’s despoiled Solitare (Jane Seymour) and thereby destroyed her psychic powers, meanwhile discussing his own links to the mysterious dictator Kananga, in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - She Had The Power And Lost It Yaphet Kotto as still largely mysterious Caribbean dictator Dr. Kananga is pressing his resplendent tarot card reader Solitare (Jane Seymour) about recent failures in her prognostications about Bond (Roger Moore, in his first performance, in the 8th 007 feature), who is on an aerial stake-out with colleague Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - The Man Who Shares My Hairbrush In fictional San Monique, bumbling but decorative novice CIA operative Rosie (ex-model and Playboy “bunny” Gloria Hendry) joins Bond (Roger Moore, in his first portrayal of 007) hiring a boat to visit the dictator’s private island, captained by Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Title Song, Insomnia, Sir? After three murders (of not-too-dashing likely-English guys) in the prologue, the title song by Paul & Linda McCartney, produced by George Martin, (which went to #2 on the Billboard U.S. chart, becoming by-far the most successful Bond theme ever) followed by M (Bernard Lee) intruding on 007 (Roger Moore, in his first appearance in the role) and a paramour (Madeline Smith), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Title Song, Plain Solid Work After an extensive action prologue, in which 007 apparently killed Blofeld, Shirley Bassey’s vocal for the title song by John Barry and Don Black, and Sean Connery as Bond appears to lack interest in more routine work, involving diamonds, explained by M (Bernard Lee), in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Let's Talk A Bit First Interrupted pre-tryst in Las Vegas with Plenty O'Toole (Lana Wood, Natalie's sister), Bond (Sean Connery), still posing as thief Peter Franks, is surprised when thugs withdraw, yielding to mysterious Tiffany (Jill St. John) in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Your Troubles Are All Behind You... Captured again by Blofeld (Charles Gray), this time on what appears to be an oil rig off California, but is really the control center for his satellite laser weapon, 007 (Sean Connery) gets an assist from Tiffany (Jill St. John), who is only pretending to have flipped, in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Making Mud Pies After dispatching some minor evil-doers, James Bond (Sean Connery, returning in his sixth 007 feature) appears to have killed Blofeld (Charles Gray) in the pre-credits opening sequence, in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971, co-starring Jill St. John.
Goldfinger (1964) - He Likes To Win 007 (Sean Connery) in his first encounter with the title character (Gert Fröbe), who's playing gin in Miami Beach with Simmons (Austin Willis), with help from Jill (Shirley Eaton) in Goldfinger, 1964.

Trailer

Man With The Golden Gun, The (1974) -- (Original Trailer) A particularly literal representation of the title, in the trailer for the 9th James Bond feature, Roger Moore’s second appearance, with Christopher Lee as scary Scaramanga, and somewhat dual Bond-girls, Maud Adams and Britt Ekland, in The Man With The Golden Gun, 1974.
Live And Let Die (1973) -- (Original Trailer) Fans today might forget that Jane Seymour was “introduced” as a Bond girl in the eighth feature in the series, with Roger Moore in his first outing, and Yaphet Kotto the chief villain, with no trace in the trailer of the hit theme song by Paul & Linda McCartney and Wings, from Live And Let Die, 1973.
Goldfinger (1964) -- (Original Trailer) United Artists and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli’s trailer for the hit third James Bond feature, starring Sean Connery, with Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore, Harold Sakata as Oddjob, and Gert Fröbe as the title character, in Goldfinger, 1964.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) -- (Original Trailer) With Sean Connery in his last James Bond film until he came back again (Never Say Never Again, 1983), the trailer for Diamonds Are Forever, 1971, co-starring Jill St. John, will Charles Gray as Blofeld.
Devil's Disciple, The (1959) -- (Original Trailer) Co-stars and producers Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas top-billed, but sharing credit with their hired colleague Laurence Olivier, playing the British General Burgoyne, in the England-made and UA distributed The Devil’s Disciple, 1959, from the George Bernard Shaw play.
African Queen, The - (Original Trailer) Humphrey Bogart won a Best Actor Oscar portraying a grizzled skipper who pilots missionary Katharine Hepburn aboard The African Queen (1951).
Battle Of Britain - (Original Trailer) Michael Caine and Sir Laurence Olivier head an all-star cast in the story of the Battle Of Britain (1969).

Companions

Naomi Chance
Wife
Actor.
Kerima
Wife
Actor. Starred in "An Outcast of the Islands".

Bibliography