Guy Green


Director
Guy Green

About

Birth Place
Somerset, England, GB
Born
November 05, 1913
Died
September 15, 2005
Cause of Death
Heart And Kidney Failure

Biography

While in his teens, Guy Green was hired to work as a clapper boy for a firm that made advertising films. He went into partnership operating a photographic portrait studio and then at age 20 entered the British film industry. Working his way up from camera assistant to camera operator to director of photography. In 1942, he was camera operator for "In Which We Serve," the patriotic docume...

Biography

While in his teens, Guy Green was hired to work as a clapper boy for a firm that made advertising films. He went into partnership operating a photographic portrait studio and then at age 20 entered the British film industry. Working his way up from camera assistant to camera operator to director of photography. In 1942, he was camera operator for "In Which We Serve," the patriotic documentary-like drama fashioned by Noel Coward and co-directed by Coward and David Lean. After serving a similar function on the Powell-Pressburger "One of Our Aircraft Is Missing" (also 1942), he shot his first feature, "Escape to Danger" (1943). Lean tapped him as director of photography for "Great Expectations" (1946) and Green's mood-enhancing work earned an Oscar. He and Lean had another triumph with "Oliver Twist" (1948). From the opening shots of an impending storm through to the film's last sequence, the expert camerawork garnered almost universal praise. He continued to provide fine work on films like "The Story of Robin Hood" (1952) and "Decameron Nights" (1953).

Green segued to the director's chair with the modest thriller "River Beat" (1954). But he excelled at social dramas ranging from the underrated "The Angry Silence" (1960), about a strike organizer, "The Mark" (1961), with Stuart Whitman in an Oscar-nominated portrayal of a sex offender whose past is held against him, and "A Patch of Blue" (1965), an interracial love story starring Sidney Poitier and Elizabeth Hartman. Many of his later features were on par with soap opera (e.g. "A Walk in the Spring Rain" 1970) or flat-out camp (i.e., "Once Is Not Enough" 1975). Green capped off his directing career with a series of TV-movies, generally built around strong female leads.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Isabel's Choice (1981)
Director
Inmates: A Love Story (1981)
Director
Jimmy B. & Andre (1980)
Director
The Incredible Journey of Doctor Meg Laurel (1979)
Director
Jennifer: A Woman's Story (1979)
Director
The Devil's Advocate (1977)
Director
Luther (1974)
Director
A Walk in the Spring Rain (1970)
Director
A Matter of Innocence (1968)
Director
The Magus (1968)
Director
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Director
Diamond Head (1963)
Director
Desert Patrol (1962)
Director
Light in the Piazza (1962)
Director
The Mark (1961)
Director
The Angry Silence (1960)
Director
S.O.S. Pacific (1960)
Director
The Snorkel (1958)
Director
Triple Deception (1957)
Director
Postmark for Danger (1956)
Director
Lost (1955)
Director
River Beat (1954)
Director

Cinematography (Feature Film)

The Warriors (1955)
Photography
I Am a Camera (1955)
Director Of Photography
Souls in Conflict (1954)
Photography
Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (1954)
Director of Photography
For Better For Worse (1954)
Director Of Photography
Decameron Nights (1953)
Director of Photography
The Beggar's Opera (1953)
Photography
The Hour of 13 (1952)
Director of Photography
The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952)
Director of Photography
Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951)
Director of Photography
Night Without Stars (1951)
Cinematographer
Escape to Danger (1944)
Camera Operator
This Happy Breed (1944)
Camera Operator
In Which We Serve (1942)
Camera Operator
One Of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1941)
Camera Operator
Hi, Gang! (1941)
Camera Operator
Breakers Ahead (1935)
Camera Operator
Song of the Plough (1933)
Camera Assistant

Writer (Feature Film)

A Patch of Blue (1965)
Screenwriter
Postmark for Danger (1956)
Adapted for the screen by
Carnival (1946)
Screenwriter

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Madeleine (1950)
Photography
The Passionate Friends (1949)
Photography
Adam And Evelyne (1949)
Photography
Oliver Twist (1948)
Photography
Blanche Fury (1948)
Photography
Take My Life (1947)
Photography
Great Expectations (1946)
Photography
Carnival (1946)
Photography
The Way to the Stars (1945)
Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)
Immortal Battalion (1944)
Photography

Production Companies (Feature Film)

A Walk in the Spring Rain (1970)
Company
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Pimpernel Smith (1941)
Other

Cast (Short)

A CINDERELLA NAMED ELIZABETH (1965)
Himself

Life Events

1929

Worked as a clapper boy for advertising films

1933

Returned to working in the film industry

1935

First credit as director of photography, "The Immortal Swan"

1942

First screen collaboration with David Lean, as camera operator on "In Which We Serve"

1947

Shot David Lean's "Great Expectations"; won Best Cinematography Oscar

1948

Served as cinematographer for Lean's "Oliver Twist"

1954

Film director "River Boat"

1955

Co-wrote and directed "Portrait of Alison/Postmark for Danger"

1961

Helmed "The Mark", featuring Stuart Whitman as a ex-con

1965

Wrote and directed the social drama "A Patch of Blue", co-starring Sidney Poitier, Elizabeth Hartman and Shelley Winters

1975

Directed the soapy "Once Is Not Enough"

1977

Final film, "The Devil's Advocate"

1978

First TV-movie, "The Incredible Journey of Doctor Meg Laurel" (CBS)

1986

Helmed the syndicated miniseries "Arthur Hailey's 'Strong Medicine'"

Photo Collections

A Patch of Blue - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken during the making of A Patch of Blue (1965).

Videos

Movie Clip

Light In The Piazza (1962) - Two Butterflies Poolside in Florence, the mentally-challenged Amerian Clara (Yvette Mimieux) frolics with Italian George Hamilton (as "Fabrizio"), mother Margaret (Olivia de Havilland) and friend (Isabel Dean) overseeing, in Light In The Piazza, 1962.
In Which We Serve (1942) - What A Bitter Blow Kinross (the writer, producer and co-director Noel Coward) addressing his crew, including John Mills, Michael Wilding and Bernard Miles, then hearing Prime Minister Chamberlain's announcement, from the government-backed propaganda hit In Which We Serve, 1942.
Passionate Friends, The (1949) - The Restrictions Imposed Near soliloquy by Claude Rains as banker Howard, alarmed because his wife and her supposedly platonic friend left their tickets for the theater behind, Betty Ann Davies his assistant, outwardly calm but with intense double-entendre in the language, from H.G. Wells’ novel and Eric Ambler’s script, in director David Lean’s The Passionate Friends, 1949.
Madeleine (1950) - Many Eyes Are Upon Her At a Glasgow society ball, Mrs. Smith (Barbara Everest) chats while her daughter (Ann Todd, title character) dances first with her father (Leslie Banks) then with Minnoch (Norman Wooland), spurned lover L'Angelier (Ivan Desny) observing, in director David Lean's fact-based Madeleine, 1950.
Madeleine (1950) - We Are Quite Alone Affluent Ann Todd (title character) has lured her lover from Glasgow (Ivan Desny) to her family’s country estate, joining him outside the grounds for an encounter overlooking the neighboring village, Todd’s husband, the director David Lean, engaging in some exhilarating cutting, in Madeleine, 1950, based on a famous 1857 murder case.
Oliver Twist (1948) - Do You Want Him? John Howard Davies (Charles Dickens' orphan title character) has just wandered into London, spied by young Anthony Newley as the Artful Dodger, then designer John Bryan and director David Lean with spectacle leading to the introduction of Fagin (Alec Guinness) in Oliver Twist, 1948.
Great Expectations (1946) - I Sometimes Have Sick Fancies Delivered by socially ambitious "Uncle" Pumblechook (Hay Petrie), lowly-born Pip (Anthony Wager) meets Estella (Jean Simmons) and Miss Havisham (Martita Hunt), the odd local lady who's summoned him, in David Lean's Great Expectations, 1946, from the Charles Dickens novel.
Great Expectations (1946) - Your Liberal Benefactor The now-mature "Pip," (John Mills) while at work with blacksmith Joe Gargery (Bernard Miles) gets a propitious visit from the lawyer Jaggers (Frances L. Sullivan) in David Lean's Great Expectations, 1946.
Great Expectations (1946) - My Christian Name Philip The chilling introduction of David Lean's Great Expectations, 1946, features John Mills' narration, Anthony Wager as young "Pip," and Finlay Currie as the evil "Magwitch."
Great Expectations (1946) - You Shall Not Shed Tears For My Cruelty The grown-up "Pip," (John Mills) visits Miss Havisham (Martita Hunt), whom he presumes to be the secret benefactor who has financed his career as a young gentleman, and sees Estella (now Valerie Hobson) for the first time since childhood in David Lean's Great Expectations, 1946.
Great Expectations (1946) - She Would Coldly Tolerate Me Young Pip (Anthony Wager) with Biddy (Eileen Erskine), now a fixture in the household of blacksmith Joe, seeking counsel before visits to Miss Havisham (Martita Hunt) and her ward Estella (Jean Simmons), his apprenticeship approaching, John Mills narrating, in David Lean’s Great Expectations, 1946.
Great Expectations (1946) - Do You Deceive And Entrap? Estella (Valerie Hobson) dances with Bentley Drummie (Torin Thatcher) then with "Pip" (John Mills), with whom she is cruelly candid in David Lean's Great Expectations, 1946.

Trailer

Bibliography