Cary Grant


Actor
Cary Grant

About

Also Known As
Archibald Alexander Leach
Birth Place
Bristol, England, GB
Born
January 18, 1904
Died
November 29, 1986
Cause of Death
Stroke

Biography

"By Bryce Coleman" opposite Constance Bennett gave Cary Grant his first financial hit, thanks to a share of the hefty profits, while "The Awful Truth" (1937) co-starring Irene Dunne made him a bona fide movie star. Basing much of his performance and mannerisms on the latter film's director, Leo McCarey, Grant gave full reign to the effortlessly charming persona he would be forever tied t...

Photos & Videos

The Bishop's Wife - Lobby Cards
An Affair to Remember - Movie Posters
The Awful Truth - Movie Poster

Family & Companions

Randolph Scott
Companion
Actor. Shared living quarters for many years when both were struggling performers as well as between marriages.
Virginia Cherrill
Wife
Actor. Married in 1933; divorced in 1935; died in November 1996 at age 88.
Barbara Hutton
Wife
Heiress to the Woolworth fortune; socialite; married in 1942; divorced in 1945.
Betsy Drake
Wife
Actor. Married in 1949; divorced in 1959; acted opposite Grant in her film debut, "Every Girl Should Be Married" (1948) and "Room for One More" (1952).

Bibliography

"Cary Grant: A Class Apart"
Graham McCann, Columbia University Press (1996)
"Dark Angel"
Geoffrey Wansell (1996)
"Evenings With Cary Grant"
Nancy Nelson (1991)
"Cary Grant: A Bio-Bibliography"
Beverly Bare Buehrer, Greenwood Press (1990)

Biography

"By Bryce Coleman" opposite Constance Bennett gave Cary Grant his first financial hit, thanks to a share of the hefty profits, while "The Awful Truth" (1937) co-starring Irene Dunne made him a bona fide movie star. Basing much of his performance and mannerisms on the latter film's director, Leo McCarey, Grant gave full reign to the effortlessly charming persona he would be forever tied to with his role in "The Awful Truth." This began a remarkably successful run for the actor, confirmed years later by director and cinema historian Peter Bogdanovich, who noted that, "After The Awful Truth, when it came to light comedy, there was Cary Grant and then everyone else was an also-ran." Over the next four years, Grant starred in an unmatched number of hit films, honing his burgeoning image to a fine gloss with each successive outing. Grant and Hepburn re-teamed twice more to perfect the screwball comedy, first with director Howard Hawks in the classic "Bringing up Baby" (1938), quickly followed by "Holiday" (1938), once again under the guidance of Cukor.

More versatile than he was often given credit for, Grant also convincingly played a man of action in films like the rousing adventure "Gunga Din" (1939) for director George Stevens and Hawk's revered aerial drama "Only Angels Have Wings" (1939). He further perfected the screwball comedy, opposite Rosalind Russell, in "His Girl Friday" (1940) and "My Favorite Wife" (1940), which re-teamed him with McCarey and frequent leading lady Irene Dunne. That same year, the smash hit "The Philadelphia Story" (1940) not only broke box office records, single-handedly revived Katharine Hepburn's flagging career, and won two Oscars, but additionally solidified Grant's imperturbable screen persona into a verifiable archetype. So effortlessly effective was the actor that Grant even managed to elevate subpar material such as the melodrama "Penny Serenade" (1941), which earned him his first Oscar nomination. In one of his most fortuitous and beneficial professional collaborations, Grant worked with the great Alfred Hitchcock for the first time on the romantic psychological-thriller "Suspicion" (1941), opposite Joan Fontaine. In a surprisingly effective break from his usual role type, Grant portrayed a handsome scoundrel suspected of murder. Famously unimpressed with thespians, director Hitchcock would later refer to Grant as "the only actor I ever loved in my whole life."

Although still a major box office draw, the harsh new realities brought on by World War II tempered audience's taste for frivolous romantic-comedies, and for the first time Grant's career faltered. One commercial bright spot of the period was his work in director Frank Capra's adaptation of the stage play "Arsenic and Old Lace" (1944). Although a hit with critics and audiences, Grant later stated that his admittedly over-the-top performance in the macabre comedy was one of his least favorites. Cast as a poor Cockney drifter in London's East End, Grant essayed a character closer to his personal origins than ever before in the drama "None But the Lonely Heart" (1944). And while it garnered the actor praise from critics and his second Academy Award nomination, the deeply flawed character was so far removed from the silky-smooth charmer he had become known for, that audiences simply could not accept him in the role. After the failure of the film, Grant would never again stray so far from his established persona. Hitchcock once again provided Grant with some of his best work - not to mention a much needed hit film - in "Notorious" (1946), a masterful espionage thriller co-starring Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains. Other efforts of the period, such as the mildly diverting fantasy "The Bishop's Wife" (1947), kept Grant on screens, but the successes were fewer and farther between than they once had been.

A serial marrier, Grant would wed a total of five times during his life, to such women as troubled heiress Barbara Hutton and actress Betsy Drake, who he met on the set of the romantic-comedy "Every Girl Should be Married" (1948). After exchanging vows the following year, the couple would appear together on screen once more in "Room for One More" (1952). With his background in vaudeville and broad comedy, Grant was disdainful of Method acting and wary of the new generation of young stars, who practiced it like Marlon Brando and James Dean. As he closed in on 50, the former king of the box office sensed his relevance beginning to wane, and as early as 1953, began making public rumblings about his imminent retirement. Thankfully, he was tempted back by Hitchcock to co-star with Grace Kelly in "To Catch a Thief" (1955), and later opposite Eva Marie Saint in "North by Northwest" (1959), considered by many to be the two most successful collaborations from the actor-director pair. After co-starring with Sophia Loren in "The Pride and the Passion" (1956), Grant fell madly in love with his Italian leading lady and pursued her ardently - even asking her to marry him - despite being married to Drake and Loren being involved with her soon-to-be-husband, Carlo Ponti.

Always a keen businessman, Grant also began his own production company in the late-1950s, mounting such features as the wartime comedy "Operation Petticoat" (1959), co-starring Tony Curtis. Struggling to reconcile the disparities of his suave onscreen persona with the humble origins of Archie Leach, Grant became increasingly bitter and unhappy. His increased dissatisfaction with the film business did little to help matters. With Grant's marriage to Drake foundering, it was she who encouraged him to join her in a new psychiatric experiment employing the little-understood hallucinogenic drug LSD. Grant agreed, and for a time, he claimed that it helped his outlook a great deal, loosening inhibitions and lowering defenses. In the long run, however, it would not provide him with the tranquility he so desperately sought.

Despite his discomfort with the marked differences in their ages, he played leading man to the much younger Audrey Hepburn in Stanley Donen's Hitchcock-esque "Charade" (1963). A year later, he took on a role as a confirmed beach bum reluctantly forced into the role of protector in the WWII comedy-adventure "Father Goose" (1964). Though considered one of his more lightweight efforts, Grant described the role to be the one closest to his real life personality. Having divorced Drake three years prior, Grant married the much younger actress Dyan Cannon in Las Vegas in 1965 and the union produced his only child, Jennifer Grant, the following year. His fourth marriage, it was also one of his rockiest, and by the time Grant's final film "Walk, Don't Run" (1966) was released, Cannon - who later accused her husband of verbal and physical abuse - was already preparing for divorce. Bored with the business of filmmaking and wanting to spend more time with his daughter, Grant announced his retirement from the screen in 1966 and despite several high-profile attempts to lure him back, he would never act in a film again.

In the years that followed, Grant remained active, joining the board of directors for several companies and organizations, including the perfumer Faberge. By all accounts he enjoyed the fruits of semi-retirement and was genuinely touched when he was honored with an Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1970. Grant had also managed to reconnect and reconcile with his mother, Elsie, who had been de-institutionalized in the 1930s. The two would remain close until her death at the age of 95 in 1974. Grant married for the fifth and final time when he wed British publicist Barbara Harris in 1981. Later, he toured the country with a one-man audience participation show, "A Conversation with Cary Grant." It was while preparing for one such performance at the Adler Theater in Davenport, IA on Nov. 29, 1986 that he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage, brought on by a stroke. Cary Grant died later that night at the age of 82.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

It's Showtime (1976)
Himself
Walk, Don't Run (1966)
William Rutland
Father Goose (1964)
Walter Eckland
Charade (1963)
Peter Joshua/Alexander Dyle/Adam Canfield/Brian Cruikshank
That Touch of Mink (1962)
Philip Shayne
The Grass Is Greener (1961)
Victor, Earl of Rhyall
North by Northwest (1959)
Roger Thornhill
Operation Petticoat (1959)
Matt T. Sherman
Houseboat (1958)
Tom Winston
Indiscreet (1958)
Philip Adams
Kiss Them for Me (1957)
Andy Crewson
The Big Show (1957)
An Affair to Remember (1957)
Nickie Ferrante
The Pride and the Passion (1957)
[Capt.] Anthony [Trumbell]
To Catch a Thief (1955)
John Robie, also known as Conrad Burns
Dream Wife (1953)
Clemson Reade
Monkey Business (1952)
Dr. Barnaby Fulton
Room for One More (1952)
George "Poppy" Rose
People Will Talk (1951)
Dr. Noah Praetorius
Crisis (1950)
Dr. Eugene Ferguson
I Was a Male War Bride (1949)
Capt. Henri Rochard
Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948)
Jim Blandings
The Bishop's Wife (1948)
Dudley
Every Girl Should Be Married (1948)
Dr. Madison [W.] Brown
The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer (1947)
Dick [Nugent]
Without Reservations (1946)
Himself
Night and Day (1946)
Cole Porter
Notorious (1946)
[T. R.] Devlin
Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)
Mortimer Brewster
Once Upon a Time (1944)
Jerry Flynn
None But the Lonely Heart (1944)
Ernest Verdun "Ernie" Mott
Destination Tokyo (1944)
Captain Cassidy
Mr. Lucky (1943)
Joe "the Greek" Adams/Joe Bascopolous
The Talk of the Town (1942)
Leopold Dilg
Once Upon a Honeymoon (1942)
Pat O'Toole
Penny Serenade (1941)
Roger Adams
Suspicion (1941)
Johnnie [Aysgarth]
My Favorite Wife (1940)
Nick [Arden]
The Philadelphia Story (1940)
C. K. Dexter Haven
His Girl Friday (1940)
Walter Burns
In Name Only (1939)
Alec Walker
Gunga Din (1939)
[ Sergeant Archibald] Cutter
Only Angels Have Wings (1939)
Geoff Carter
Topper Takes a Trip (1939)
George Kerby
Holiday (1938)
Johnny Case
Bringing Up Baby (1938)
[Dr.] David [Huxley]
The Awful Truth (1937)
Jerry Warriner
The Toast of New York (1937)
Nick Boyd
When You're in Love (1937)
Jimmy Hudson
Topper (1937)
George Kerby
Romance and Riches (1937)
Wedding Present (1936)
Charlie Mason
Sylvia Scarlett (1936)
Jimmy Monkley
Big Brown Eyes (1936)
Danny Barr
Suzy (1936)
Andre [Charville]
Wings in the Dark (1935)
Ken Gordon
The Last Outpost (1935)
Michael Andrews
Thirty Day Princess (1934)
Porter Madison, III
Enter Madame! (1934)
Gerald Fitzgerald
Born to Be Bad (1934)
Malcolm Trevor
Kiss and Make-Up (1934)
Dr. Maurice Lamar
Ladies Should Listen (1934)
Julian de Lussac
She Done Him Wrong (1933)
Captain Cummings
The Eagle and the Hawk (1933)
Henry Crocker
The Woman Accused (1933)
The Man/Jeffrey Baxter
I'm No Angel (1933)
Jack Clayton
Gambling Ship (1933)
Ace Corbin
Alice in Wonderland (1933)
Mock Turtle
Merrily We Go to Hell (1932)
Charlie Baxter
This Is the Night (1932)
Stephen [Mathewson]
Sinners in the Sun (1932)
Ridgeway
Madame Butterfly (1932)
Lieutenant B. F. Pinkerton
Hot Saturday (1932)
Romer Sheffield
Blonde Venus (1932)
Nick Townsend
Devil and the Deep (1932)
Lieutenant Jaeckel

Producer (Feature Film)

The Grass Is Greener (1961)
Executive Producer
Indiscreet (1958)
Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

It's Showtime (1976)
Other

Cast (Special)

Cary Grant: A Class Apart (2004)
Himself
George Burns' 90th Birthday Special (1986)
All Star Party for Clint Eastwood (1986)
George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey (1984)
Himself
All-Star Party For Lucille Ball (1984)
Nativity (1983)
Narrator
Sinatra: The First 40 Years (1980)
The Men Who Made the Movies: Howard Hawks (1973)
Himself
The American Film Institute Salute to John Ford (1973)
Performer

Misc. Crew (Special)

George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey (1984)
Other

Cast (Short)

The Road to Victory (1944)
Himself
Cary Grant: In a Tribute to the Will Rogers Memorial Hospital (1940)
Himself
Pirate Party on Catalina Isle (1935)
Himself
Singapore Sue (1932)

Life Events

1917

Joined a travelling acrobatic troupe

1920

Arrived in New York with acrobatic troupe

1923

First role on the British stage

1931

Appeared in the film short, "Singapore Sue"

1932

Made feature film debut in a supporting role in "This Is the Night"

1937

Confirmed his star status with the landmark screwball comedy, "The Awful Truth"

1941

First film with Alfred Hitchcock, "Suspicion"

1966

Last film, "Walk, Don't Run"

Photo Collections

The Bishop's Wife - Lobby Cards
The Bishop's Wife - Lobby Cards
An Affair to Remember - Movie Posters
Here are a few original-release American movie posters from Leo McCarey's An Affair to Remember (1957), starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr.
The Awful Truth - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster from Columbia's The Awful Truth (1937), starring Irene Dunne and Cary Grant. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948), starring Cary Grant and Myrna Loy. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Penny Serenade - Movie Posters
Here are two different styles of the American one-sheet movie poster for Penny Serenade (1941), starring Cary Grant and Irene Dunne. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Arsenic and Old Lace - Scene Stills
Here are some scene stills from Frank Capra's Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), starring Cary Grant, Priscilla Lane, and Raymond Massey.
North by Northwest - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from North by Northwest (1959). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Philadelphia Story - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from The Philadelphia Story (1940), starring Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, and James Stewart. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Philadelphia Story - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a number of Behind-the-Scenes photos taken during production of The Philadelphia Story (1940), directed by George Cukor and starring Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and James Stewart.
Hot Saturday - Lobby Cards
Hot Saturday - Lobby Cards
Only Angels Have Wings - Movie Posters
Only Angels Have Wings - Movie Posters
Only Angels Have Wings - Lobby Cards
Only Angels Have Wings - Lobby Cards
Only Angels Have Wings - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Only Angels Have Wings - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Indiscreet - Movie Poster
Indiscreet - Movie Poster
The Talk of the Town - Lobby Cards
The Talk of the Town - Lobby Cards
My Favorite Wife - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from RKO's My Favorite Wife (1940), directed by Garson Kanin and starring Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, and Randolph Scott.
Notorious - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of RKO's Notorious (1946), starring Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant, and directed by Alfred Hitchcock.
Topper - Movie Poster
Here is an original Window Card from Topper (1937), starring Cary Grant and Constance Bennett. Window Cards were mini posters designed to be placed in store windows around town during a film's engagement. A blank space at the top of the poster featured theater and playdate infromation.
To Catch a Thief - Movie Posters
Here are several original-release American movie posters for Paramount's To Catch a Thief (1955), directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly.
The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few Behind-the-Scenes photos taken during production of The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer (1947).
Monkey Business - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from Howard Hawks' Monkey Business (1952), starring Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Bishop's Wife - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Bishop's Wife (1948), starring Cary Grant, Loretta Young, and David Niven. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Suspicion - Publicity Art
Here are a couple of specialty drawings created by RKO for newspaper reproduction to publicize Suspicion (1941), starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine. To cover their bases, there is a both a humorous treatment and a serious one.
Suspicion - Publicity Stills
Here are a few Publicity Stills from Alfred Hitchcock's Suspicion (1941). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Gunga Din - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of RKO's Gunga Din (1939), directed by George Stevens and starring Cary Grant, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., and Victor McLaglen.
North by Northwest - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are several behind-the-scenes photos taken during the shooting of North by Northwest (1959). Look for director Alfred Hitchcock and stars Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, and James Mason.
Dream Wife - Publicity Stills
Here are a few Publicity Stills from Dream Wife (1953). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Bringing Up Baby - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are several behind-the-scenes photos taken during the shooting of Bringing Up Baby (1938). Look for director Howard Hawks and stars Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant.
That Touch of Mink - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for That Touch of Mink (1962), starring Cary Grant and Doris Day. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Arsenic and Old Lace - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Arsenic and Old Lace (1944). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Holiday - Movie Posters
Here are a few original-release American movie posters from Holiday (1938), starring Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.
Devil and the Deep - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Paramount Pictures' Devil and the Deep (1932), starring Gary Cooper, Tallulah Bankhead, and Charles Laughton.
The Last Outpost - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Paramount Pictures' The Last Outpost (1935), starring Cary Grant, Claude Rains, and Gertrude Michael.
The Eagle and the Hawk - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Paramount Pictures' The Eagle and the Hawk (1933), starring Fredric March, Cary Grant, Carole Lombard, and Jack Oakie.
This Is the Night - Movie Posters
This Is the Night - Movie Posters
This Is the Night - Lobby Cards
Here are several lobby cards from Paramount's This Is the Night (1932), starring Lily Damita, Roland Young, Cary Grant, Charles Ruggles, and Thelma Todd. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
This Is the Night - Scene Stills
Here are a few scene stills from Paramount's This is the Night (1932), starring Lily Damita, Roland Young, Charlie Ruggles, Cary Grant, and Thelma Todd.
This Is the Night - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from Paramount's This is the Night (1932), starring Lily Damita, Roland Young, Charlie Ruggles, Cary Grant, and Thelma Todd. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Operation Petticoat - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release American movie posters for Operation Petticoat (1959), starring Cary Grant and Tony Curtis.
Every Girl Should Be Married - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from Every Girl Should Be Married (1948), starring Cary Grant and Betsy Drake. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
None But the Lonely Heart - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from RKO's None But the Lonely Heart (1944), starring Cary Grant. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Suzy - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills taken for Suzy (1936), starring Cary Grant and Jean Harlow. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Eagle and the Hawk - Lobby Cards
Here are several Lobby Cards from Paramount Pictures' The Eagle and the Hawk (1933), starring Fredric March, Cary Grant and Carole Lombard. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Eagle and the Hawk - Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos taken to help publicize Paramount Pictures' The Eagle and the Hawk (1933), starring Fredric March, Cary Grant, and Carole Lombard. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Last Outpost - Lobby Cards
Here are several Lobby Cards from Paramount Pictures' The Last Outpost (1935), starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Last Outpost - Movie Poster
Here is an original-release Window Card movie poster from The Last Outpost (1935), starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains. Window Cards were 14x22 mini posters designed to be placed in store windows around town during a film's engagement. A blank space at the top of the poster featured theater and playdate information. (The top has been trimmed from this example).
The Last Outpost - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from Paramount's The Last Outpost (1935). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Eagle and the Hawk - Movie Poster
Here is the original one-sheet movie poster for Paramount's The Eagle and the Hawk (1933), starring Fredric March and Cary Grant. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Notorious - Movie Poster
Here is an original-release half-sheet movie poster for Notorious (1946), starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Half-sheets measured 22 x 28 inches.
Gunga Din - Movie Posters
Following are several movie posters from Gunga Din (1939), starring Cary Grant, Victor McLaglen, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Examples are from American, French and Belgian releases.
The Pride and the Passion - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Pride and the Passion (1957), starring Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, and Sophia Loren. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Crisis - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes of Crisis (1950), directed by Richard Brooks.
Suzy - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from Suzy (1936), starring Cary Grant and Jean Harlow. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Philadelphia Story - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Philadelphia Story (1941). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
In Name Only - Publicity Still
Here is a publicity still from RKO's In Name Only (1939), starring Cary Grant and Carole Lombard. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Videos

Movie Clip

To Catch A Thief (1955) - Ever Been Married? Alfred Hitchcock was likely more interested in the color than the story, as he arranges for Robie (Cary Grant) to meet Hughson (John Williams) in the flower market in Nice, in To Catch A Thief, 1955.
Merrily We Go To Hell (1932) — (Movie Clip) Less Ventilation And More Smoke! Joan (Sylvia Sidney) has just told her drunken playwright faithless husband Jerry (Fredric March) that she’s willing to try a modern, open marriage so she’s met his dashing actor friend Charlie (Cary Grant!) for lunch, then they join a theater-scene party (pals Skeets Gallagher and Adrianne Allen attending), with humor masking bitterness, Dorothy Arzner directing, in Merrily We Go To Hell, 1932.
Gunga Din (1939) - Children Are Looking Bonnie! Cutter (Cary Grant) and MacChesney (Victor McLaglen) enter a seemingly abandoned Indian village, where comrade Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks) discovers mysterious Chota (Abner Biberman), early in George Stevens' Gunga Din, 1939.
Gunga Din (1939) - Very Regimental! Famous scene in which Cutter (Cary Grant) supports Sam Jaffe (title character), the humble native water carrier, in his regular-army fantasy, in George Stevens' Gunga Din, based on the Rudyard Kipling poem.
Gunga Din (1939) - We Were Swindled First appearance by India corps sergeants MacChesney (Victor McLaglen), Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) and Cutter (Cary Grant), summoned to commander Weed (Montagu Love), in George Stevens' Gunga Din, 1939.
In Name Only (1939) - People In Our Position Following his car crash, Maida (Kay Francis) thinks she's caught spouse Alec (Cary Grant) red-handed, leading to his righteous denial and turnabout, early in John Cromwell's In Name Only, 1939.
Philadelphia Story, The (1941) - They Grew Up Together Complexity as Tracy (Katharine Hepburn) performs for impostor society wedding guests (really reporters) Mike (James Stewart) and Liz (Ruth Hussey), fiancè George (John Howard) arrives, and her ex, Dexter (Cary Grant) crashes in The Philadelphia Story, 1941.
Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - Men Never Get This Movie! Writer-director Nora Ephron, Meg Ryan as Annie (engaged to “Walter”) and Rosie O’Donnell as pal Becky dig into director Leo McCarey’s An Affair To Remember, 1957, with Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, while Meg considers a letter to the widowed father (Tom Hanks) she heard on the radio, in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - All I Could Say Was Hello (Significant SPOILER!) Meg Ryan as (otherwise) engaged Annie is benevolently stalking Tom Hanks, as single-dad Sam, (with Ross Malinger as his son and Rita Wilson, Tom’s real-life wife, as his sister, though Meg assumes she’s a girlfriend), then explaining to Becky (Rosie O’Donnell) back in Baltimore, leading to a second reference to Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, in An Affair To Remember, 1957, in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Monkey Business (1952) - Not Yet, Cary! Perhaps a bit creaky now but a neatly tied-in opening from director Howard Hawks, introducing Cary Grant as scientist Barnaby Fulton, Ginger Rogers as his wife Edwina, in Monkey Business, 1952, co-starring Marilyn Monroe.
Topper (1937) - Stop Being A Mummy From the annual board meeting, top share-holder George (Cary Grant) is disruptive, his inhibited banker friend Roland Young (title character) grumbling afterward before he notices wife Marion (Constance Bennett), in the office, the pair then considering his prospects, in Topper, 1937.
Topper (1937) - Old Man Moon From the opening sequence, affluent George and Marion (Cary Grant, Constance Bennett) go night-clubbing before his morning bank-board meeting, finishing at a joint where they’re on first names with Hoagy Carmichael himself, joining him in an original tune, in the Hal Roach comedy Topper 1937.

Trailer

Houseboat - (Original Trailer) Cary Grant is a widower who hires runaway socialite Sophia Loren to look after his children on his rickety Houseboat (1958).
Only Angels Have Wings - (Original Trailer) Cary Grant heads a team of flyers in a mountainous South American country in Howard Hawks' Only Angels Have Wings (1939).
Night and Day - (Original Trailer) Fanciful biography of songwriter Cole Porter (Cary Grant), who rose from high society to find success on Tin Pan Alley.
I'm No Angel - (Original Trailer) Mae West and Cary Grant star in I'm No Angel (1933) about a carnival dancer who evades the law and invades high society.
Pride and The Passion, The - (Original Trailer) A British naval officer (Cary Grant) helps Spanish peasants haul a large cannon cross-country to battle Napoleon in The Pride and The Passion (1957).
His Girl Friday -- (Original Trailer) Cary Grant does everything to keep his ex-wife and star reporter Rosalind Russell from re-marriage in Howard Hawks' classic comedy His Girl Friday (1940).
Bishop's Wife, The - (Original Trailer) Cary Grant, Loretta Young and David Niven, stars of the romantic fantasy The Bishop's Wife (1947), introduce the...we'll let them explain.
Kiss Them For Me - (Original Trailer) Three navy war heroes are booked on a morale-building "vacation" in San Francisco and plan to throw a wild party in Kiss Them For Me (1957) starring Cary Grant and Jayne Mansfield. Directed by Stanley Donen.
Topper (1937) - (Original Trailer) Cary Grant and Constance Bennett are a couple of playful ghosts adding new life to a stuffy bank president (Roland Young), called Topper (1937).
Arsenic and Old Lace - (Original Trailer) A young man (Cary Grant) about to be married discovers his two aunts are poisoning lonely old men in Arsenic and Old Lace, (1944).
Without Reservations - (Re-issue trailer) John Wayne and Claudette Colbert star in Without Reservations (1946) about a woman writer and a war hero.
Suspicion - (Re-issue Trailer) A wealthy wallflower (Joan Fontaine) suspects her penniless playboy husband (Cary Grant) of murder in Suspicion (1942), directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Promo

Family

Elsie Leach
Mother
Institutionalized in mental hospital when Grant was aged 12.
Elias Leach
Father
Pants presser.
Jennifer Grant
Daughter
Born on February 26, 1966; mother, Dyan Cannon.

Companions

Randolph Scott
Companion
Actor. Shared living quarters for many years when both were struggling performers as well as between marriages.
Virginia Cherrill
Wife
Actor. Married in 1933; divorced in 1935; died in November 1996 at age 88.
Barbara Hutton
Wife
Heiress to the Woolworth fortune; socialite; married in 1942; divorced in 1945.
Betsy Drake
Wife
Actor. Married in 1949; divorced in 1959; acted opposite Grant in her film debut, "Every Girl Should Be Married" (1948) and "Room for One More" (1952).
Dyan Cannon
Wife
Actor. Married from 1965 to 1968.
Barbara Harris
Wife
Married from 1981 until his death.

Bibliography

"Cary Grant: A Class Apart"
Graham McCann, Columbia University Press (1996)
"Dark Angel"
Geoffrey Wansell (1996)
"Evenings With Cary Grant"
Nancy Nelson (1991)
"Cary Grant: A Bio-Bibliography"
Beverly Bare Buehrer, Greenwood Press (1990)