Michael Gordon


Director

About

Birth Place
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Born
September 06, 1909
Died
April 29, 1993
Cause of Death
Natural Causes

Biography

Active with the Group Theater and such workers' filmmaking groups as Frontier Films during the 1930s and began in Hollywood as a dialogue director in 1940. Gordon's first films were insignificant B's, but he came into his own later in the decade with a series of taut melodramas and action pictures. "The Web" (1947) was a clever, strongly plotted film noir, "The Lady Gambles" (1949) gave ...

Biography

Active with the Group Theater and such workers' filmmaking groups as Frontier Films during the 1930s and began in Hollywood as a dialogue director in 1940. Gordon's first films were insignificant B's, but he came into his own later in the decade with a series of taut melodramas and action pictures. "The Web" (1947) was a clever, strongly plotted film noir, "The Lady Gambles" (1949) gave Barbara Stanwyck a good emotional workout as a gambling addict, "Woman in Hiding" (1950) put Ida Lupino in edgy peril, and "I Can Get It for Your Wholesale" (1951) offered Susan Hayward a suitably aggressive showcase as a fashion entrepreneur.

Unfortunately, Gordon fell prey to the paranoia-driven blacklisting of the era and did not return to feature films until the end of the decade. When he did come back, it was with one of his most popular and well-remembered efforts, "Pillow Talk" (1959), starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson. Gordon followed this enjoyable sex farce with increasingly strained and derivative imitations, however, including "Boys' Night Out" (1962), "Move Over, Darling" (1963) and "A Very Special Favor" (1965). His career as a director petered out around 1970, but he later distinguished himself as a member of UCLA's theater arts faculty. The technical competence and smooth, intelligent control of Gordon's best films, though, made one wish that his professional peak had not been so abruptly interrupted.

Life Events

1935

Involved with New York's noted Group Theater

1940

First film as dialogue director

1942

Directed first feature films, "Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood" and "Underground Agent"

1959

Directed first film for eight years, "Pillow Talk"

1970

Directed last film, "How Do I Love Thee?"

Photo Collections

Woman in Hiding - Behind-the-Scenes Photo
Here is a photo taken behind-the-scenes during production of Woman in Hiding (1949), starring Ida Lupino and Stephen McNally.

Videos

Movie Clip

Impossible Years, The (1968) - You Belong On The Couch Psych professor Kingsley (David Niven), his house overrun by his kids’ party, entertains his editor Merrick (Chad Everett), joined then by Jeff Cooper as motorbiker artist Smuts (Jeff Cooper), broken up by his daughter (supermodel Cristina Ferrare in her first movie) and buddy (Mike McGreevey) in The Impossible Years, 1968.
Impossible Years, The (1968) - A Nymphomaniac I Met At A Party Vexed psych professor and author Kingsley (David Niven) waylaid by his editor Merrick (Chad Everett), who’s heard of his daughter (Christina Ferrare) being arrested in the campus protest, inter-cut with her on the beach with hormonal boyfriend Freddie (Rich Chalet), in The Impossible Years, 1968.
Impossible Years, The (1968) - Teeny-Bopper Hippie Offspring End of the credits over an MGM version of a 1960’s college riot, landing on David Niven as a psychology professor in class, queried by a campus reporter before taking an unwelcome call from his wife (Lola Albright) about his daughter (Cristina Ferrare), in The Impossible Years, 1968.
Pillow Talk (1959) - Title Song Cute graphics, the leading lady with the title tune by Buddy Pepper and Inez James, to Doris Day in the blue negligee and leading man Rock Hudson introducing the premise and the graphic gimmick, off to a rollicking start in their first picture together, in Pillow Talk, 1959.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - I've Been There Before Nick (James Garner) with new wife (Polly Bergen) at the hotel where he honeymooned with presumed-dead Ellen (Doris Day), not knowing she's in the lobby, copying the elevator shot from My Favorite Wife, Fred Clark, Max Showalter and Eddie Quillan on staff, in the re-make Move Over, Darling, 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - I'm Not Squirming! Having installed his believed-dead wife Ellen (Doris Day) in the next suite, Nick (James Garner) has to deal with his new-wife Bianca (Polly Bergen) on their wedding night, who’s both amorous and furious at his repeated departures, intending to tell her the news, in the re-make of My Favorite Wife, Move Over, Darling 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - What About Binaca? At the hotel where they honeymooned, having seen each other in the lobby as he checked in with his new bride, Nick (James Garner) hurries to find Ellen (Doris Day), who has, on the day she was declared legally dead, returned after five years lost at sea, with no time to explain, in the remake of My Favorite Wife, Move Over, Darling 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - She's Drownded! Doris Day is Ellen, still in her Navy dungarees, returning unannounced to her Beverly Hills home, her daughters (Pami Lee, Leslie Farrell) having no idea she's been rescued after five years on a desert island, her mother-in-law (Thelma Ritter) plain shocked, in the re-make of My Favorite Wife, Move Over, Darling, 1963 co-starring James Garner.
Pillow Talk (1959) - Has He Made Immoral Overtures? Joining infuriated party-line customer Jan (Doris Day), we meet her ever hung-over maid Alma (Thelma Ritter) then the phone company man (Hayden Rorke), following just the first encounter with the leading man (Rock Hudson) she hasn't yet met, in Pillow Talk, 1959.
Boys' Night Out (1962) - We Should Have Gone Bowling Four New York commuters, single Fred (James Garner) and married George, Doug and Howard (Tony Randall, Howard Duff, Howard Morris) lamenting that their Thursday night standing date has grown dull, William Bendix their barkeep, opening the Kim Novak comedy vehicle Boys’ Night Out, 1962.
Boys' Night Out (1962) - The Boys Are All Aces Single Fred (James Garner) intends to chivalrously talk sociology student Cathy (Kim Novak) out of posing as a hired companion for him and his three married buddies, but she’s a step ahead, so George (Tony Randal), with Doug and Howard (Howard Duff, Howard Morris) prepares for the first date, in Boys’ Night Out, 1962.
Boys' Night Out (1962) - Tea Many Martoonis Bachelor Fred (James Garner) is drinking alone, thinking his three married buddies won’t show up to see the love-nest apartment he had intended to fail to rent, so he’s that much more surprised when Cathy (Kim Novak, her first scene) appears, when he hasn’t even placed the second ad, for a shared companion, in Boys’ Night Out, 1962.

Trailer

Bibliography