Willis Goldbeck


Director, Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
October 24, 1898
Died
September 17, 1979

Biography

Willis Goldbeck wrote a variety of screenplays throughout the duration of his Hollywood career. A screenwriter for film, Goldbeck's best work was often considered to include the adventure "Scaramouche" (1923) with Ramon Novarro, "The Alaskan" (1924) and the fantasy "Peter Pan" (1924) with Betty Bronson. He also appeared in the drama "Mare Nostrum" (1926) with Alice Terry, "A Kiss For...

Biography

Willis Goldbeck wrote a variety of screenplays throughout the duration of his Hollywood career. A screenwriter for film, Goldbeck's best work was often considered to include the adventure "Scaramouche" (1923) with Ramon Novarro, "The Alaskan" (1924) and the fantasy "Peter Pan" (1924) with Betty Bronson. He also appeared in the drama "Mare Nostrum" (1926) with Alice Terry, "A Kiss For Cinderella" (1926) and "The Enemy" (1928). Toward the end of his career, Goldbeck directed "Rationing" (1944) with Wallace Beery, "Three Men in White" (1944) and the Van Johnson drama "Between Two Women" (1945). He also appeared in "Love Laughs at Andy Hardy" (1947). Goldbeck last produced the western "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962) with James Stewart. Goldbeck passed away in September 1979 at the age of 81.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Jamboree (1954)
Director
Ten Tall Men (1951)
Director
Johnny Holiday (1950)
Director
Love Laughs at Andy Hardy (1947)
Director
Dark Delusion (1947)
Director
Between Two Women (1945)
Director
She Went to the Races (1945)
Director
Rationing (1944)
Director
Three Men in White (1944)
Director
Dr. Gillespie's Criminal Case (1943)
Director
Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant (1942)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)
Screenwriter
Sergeant Rutledge (1960)
Writer
Cross-Up (1958)
Screenwriter
The Colossus of New York (1958)
Based on a Story by
Ten Tall Men (1951)
Story
Johnny Holiday (1950)
Screenwriter
Calling Dr. Gillespie (1942)
Screenwriter
Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant (1942)
Original Screenplay
Dr. Kildare's Victory (1942)
Screenwriter
Dr. Kildare's Wedding Day (1941)
Screenwriter
The People vs. Dr. Kildare (1941)
Screenwriter
Dr. Kildare Goes Home (1940)
Screenwriter
Dr. Kildare's Crisis (1940)
Screenwriter
Dr. Kildare's Strange Case (1940)
Screenwriter
Dr. Kildare's Strange Case (1940)
Original Story
Dr. Kildare's Crisis (1940)
Story
Dr. Kildare Goes Home (1940)
Original Story
The Secret of Dr. Kildare (1939)
Screenwriter
Calling Dr. Kildare (1939)
Screenwriter
Young Dr. Kildare (1938)
Screenwriter
Two in the Dark (1936)
Screenwriter
The Garden of Allah (1936)
Contr to trmt
Wednesday's Child (1934)
Screenwriter
Murder on the Blackboard (1934)
Screenwriter
Penguin Pool Murder (1932)
Screenwriter
Freaks (1932)
Screenwriter
Wild Orchids (1929)
Adaptation
Desert Nights (1929)
Scen
Diamond Handcuffs (1928)
Adaptation
The Enemy (1928)
Adaptation
Lilac Time (1928)
Adaptation
The Enemy (1928)
Cont
The Garden of Allah (1927)
Screenplay Adapted
Convoy (1927)
Scen
A Kiss for Cinderella (1926)
Scen
Mare Nostrum (1926)
Adaptation
Flower of Night (1925)
Screenwriter
Scaramouche (1924)
Scen
The Alaskan (1924)
Scen
Peter Pan (1924)
Screenplay and Adapted
The Side Show of Life (1924)
Scen
Open All Night (1924)
Scen
Bluff (1924)
Scen

Producer (Feature Film)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)
Producer
Sergeant Rutledge (1960)
Producer
The Lone Ranger (1956)
Producer
Zarak (1956)
Producer
I Died a Thousand Times (1955)
Producer
The Roadhouse Murder (1932)
Associate Producer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

The Garden of Allah (1936)
Assistant to prod

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Young Dr. Kildare (1938) - Bring Me A Tourniquet! Back at the hospital, new intern Lew Ayres (title character) examines his still-unconscious patient (Jo Ann Sayers) whom he revived from a gas suicide attempt, drawing conclusions and barbs from his crusty boss Gillespie (Lionel Barrymore), in the first in the MGM series, Young Dr. Kildare, 1938.
Young Dr. Kildare (1938) - I'm Strong As A Horse Pace suggesting a shortage of film, the first scene minus one from the first picture in the series, girlfriend Alice (Lynne Carver) with parents Dr. Steve and Martha (Samuel S. Hinds, Emma Dunn) greet the title character Lew Ayres on his return from med school, in MGM’s Young Dr. Kildare, 1938.
Young Dr. Kildare (1938) - The Irish Do Well With Horses Fresh from medical school and his Connecticut home town, Lew Ayres (title character) arrives at the big New York hospital where Dr. Carew (Walter Kingsford) is introducing other interns (Truman Bradley et al) to intimidating top-billed Lionel Barrymore as Gillespie, in the first film in the MGM series, Young Dr. Kildare, 1938.
Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - Too Bad About Your Stock Exteriors and interiors at the old New York Aquarium at Battery Park (closed in 1941) make good framing for striking intensity with exhibitor Hemingway (Clarence Wilson), broker Parker (Guy Usher) and his sneaking wife (Mae Clarke), in the first “Miss Withers” picture, starring Edna May Oliver, from the Stuart Palmer novel, Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - I Believe The Word Is "Scrammed" Upstairs at the aquarium, debriefing witnesses, James Gleason as cop Piper tangles with Edna May Oliver as the lead, schoolteacher-snoop Miss Withers, interviewing potential suspect Seymour (Donald Cook), as the cop Donovan (Edgar Kennedy) stops another crime, in Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - Never Try To Evade The Law Foul play already underway, Joe Hermano the escaping thief, then the delightful introduction, George Archainbaud directing, of Edna May Oliver as schoolteacher Miss Withers in the first feature in the series based on Stuart Palmer’s novels, shot inside the old New York Aquarium, James Donlan the guard, Edgar Kennedy the cop, in Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - I Could Get A Substitute Dropping by her pad to collect her exemplary notes on his interviews, cop Piper (James Gleason) is surprised by the royal spread provided by Miss Withers (Edna May Oliver, in her first appearance as the character from the Stuart Palmer novels), with much sparking as he realizes her hat-pin may have been the weapon, in Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - That's A Little Vulgar Following a lead, Edna May Oliver as schoolteacher-sleuth Miss Withers engages the sultry sectary (Mary Mason) of the victim, her last barb a reference to the name of a well known women’s tonic, then bumps into maybe-suspicious lawyer Costello (Robert Armstrong) at the cop shop, in the first in the series, Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - I Hate Tricks, Pilgrim John Wayne as rough-hewn rancher Tom Doniphon has come to consider city-born lawyer Ranse (James Stewart) a rival for his girl, but also feels some duty to warn him against confronting the notorious outlaw, thus this famous scene from John Ford’s The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - Print The Legend SPOILER in a way, Doniphon (John Wayne) finishes his pep talk and holds the door as Stoddard (James Stewart) launches his political career and, flashing back to "present day," editor Scott (Carleton Young) utters the famous line, in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - That's My Steak Men fight over meat, with Ranse (James Stewart) waiting table, Liberty (Lee Marvin) making trouble, and Tom (John Wayne) booting Strother Martin, in an outrageous confrontation from John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - I'd Have Had A Bang-up Funeral Sen. and Mrs. Stoddard (James Stewart, Vera Miles) discover the minimal preparations for a friend's funeral, Pompey (Woody Strode) already mourning, Earle Hudgins and Andy Devine featured, early in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.

Trailer

Bibliography