John Glen


Director, Editor

About

Birth Place
Sunbury-on-Thames, England, GB
Born
May 15, 1932

Biography

A former film editor and second unit director, Glen has carved his niche in action pictures. His first credit was on the James Bond flick "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969). Other credits as film editor include Peter Yates' "Murphy's War" (1970), the trial drama "Conduct Unbecoming" (1975) and the Bond films "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) and "Moonraker" (1979), both directed by Lew...

Biography

A former film editor and second unit director, Glen has carved his niche in action pictures. His first credit was on the James Bond flick "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969). Other credits as film editor include Peter Yates' "Murphy's War" (1970), the trial drama "Conduct Unbecoming" (1975) and the Bond films "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) and "Moonraker" (1979), both directed by Lewis Gilbert. He moved to the director's chair with "For Your Eyes Only" (1981), which eschewed much of the gadgetry and cartoon style of the previous entries in the series. Glen serviceably directed four more Bond films "Octopussy" (1983), "A View to a Kill" (1985), "The Living Daylights" (1987) and "Licence to Kill" (1989). Since abandoning the Bond franchise, he has overseen "Aces: Iron Eagle III" and the unsuccessful "Christopher Columbus: The Discovery" (both 1992).

Life Events

1969

Feature debut as 2nd unit director and editor, also first collaboration with Peter Hunt, "On Her Majesty's Secret Service"

1976

First collaboration with Lewis Gilbert, served as editor, "Seven Nights in Japan"

1981

Directorial debut, "For Your Eyes Only"

1990

TV debut, directed ABC special, "Checkered Flag"

1992

Directed first non-Bond feature, "Aces: Iron Eagle III"

Videos

Movie Clip

Living Daylights, The (1987) - The Sniper Was A Woman Shooting around the Volksoper in Vienna, standing in for the Bratislava Opera House, Bond (Timothy Dalton) has been assigned to support the apparently fussy Saunders (Thomas Wheatley) executing the defection of a top Soviet general (Jeroen Krabbé), Maryam D’Abo the cellist and sniper opposing, early in The Living Daylights, 1987.
Licence To Kill (1989) - A Farewell To Arms Working with Sharkey (Frank McRae), Bond (Timothy Dalton) is pretty much gone rogue in Key West over attacks on American friend Felix Leiter, so he’s intercepted by DEA man Hawkins (Grand L. Bush) and delivered to the Hemingway house where “M” (Robert Brown) waits to crack the whip, in Licence To Kill, 1989.
Licence To Kill (1989) - It's Just A Manta Ray Krest (Anthony Zerbe), creepy ally of the drug-lord villain Sanchez, is looking to exploit his girlfriend Lupe (Talisa Soto) when Bond (Timothy Dalton), on a revenge mission having forsaken his MI6 duties, deploys an underwater trick, in Licence To Kill, 1989.
Licence To Kill (1989) - You Carrying? Chasing the remnants of his almost-murdered CIA pal Felix Leiter’s operation, brings now-rogue James Bond (Timothy Dalton) to Bimini to meet Pam Bouvier (Carey Lowell), who was barely introduced earlier, threatened together by Benicio Del Toro (as Dario), representing the drug lord Sanchez, in Licence To Kill, 1989.
Licence To Kill (1989) - 555 Love Now in Isthmus (meant to be Panama, though shooting in Casino Español de Mexico, Mexico City) Bond (Timothy Dalton) and CIA Pam (Carey Lowell) make sure they’re seen by owner, drug-lord and villain Sanchez (Robert Davi, Anthony Starke his minion on the phone) and we meet singer Wayne Newton as televangelist “Professor Joe Butcher,” in on the scam, in Licence To Kill, 1989.
Licence To Kill (1989) - Open, Let's Go Fishing Joining the action opening in the Florida keys, Bond (Timothy Dalton), suited for the interrupted wedding of his CIA pal Felix (David Hedison), first meets the jettisoned faithless girlfriend (Talisa Soto) of fleeing drug kingpin Sanchez (Robert Davi), then rejoins the chase, in Licence To Kill, 1989, Grand L. Bush and Olympic hero Rafer Johnson in the DEA outfits, Priscilla Barnes the bride, Tina Turner with the theme song.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- I Hope You Have A Car Having parked his Lotus, casing “a villa near Madrid,” where Cuban assassin Gonzales (Stefan Kalipha), who killed an MI6-asset couple, is being paid off by an unidentified spook (Michael Gothard), Bond (Roger Moore) is captured, until the victims’ daughter (Carole Bouquet) steps in with a crossbow, in For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- By Strangling His Psychiatrist Back in London, Bond (Roger Moore) visits Q (Desmond Llewelyn) for the requisite gadget-gag sequence, then uses the “Identigraph” to pick out Locque (Michael Gothard), finishing with a mild admonition by Tanner (James Villiers), standing in for “on-leave” M (actually the late Bernard Lee, who died during preparation for the film), in For Your Eyes Only, 1981.

Trailer

Bibliography