Leo Genn


Actor
Leo Genn

About

Also Known As
Lt. Col. Leo Genn
Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
August 09, 1905
Died
January 26, 1978

Biography

The career of British-born actor Leo Genn reached its Hollywood peak in 1951 with the Roman Empire saga "Quo Vaids." Genn for his turn as Petronius and Peter Ustinov as Nero were both nominated that year for Best Supporting Actor Academy Awards, losing to Karl Malden for "A Streetcar Named Desire." (Ustinov did, however, win the Golden Globe that year.) Four years later, Genn was the thi...

Biography

The career of British-born actor Leo Genn reached its Hollywood peak in 1951 with the Roman Empire saga "Quo Vaids." Genn for his turn as Petronius and Peter Ustinov as Nero were both nominated that year for Best Supporting Actor Academy Awards, losing to Karl Malden for "A Streetcar Named Desire." (Ustinov did, however, win the Golden Globe that year.) Four years later, Genn was the third corner of the infamous love triangle in a French production of "Lady Chatterley's Lover." His was a journeyman's career, with ultimately more forgettable lows than memorable highs. Certainly, his beginnings in 1930s London theater, playing opposite Laurence Olivier, for example, in a production of "Hamlet," held more promise than what eventually transpired. Other noteworthy credits include 1953's "Personal Affair," 1956's "Moby Dick," and the 1960 Italian drama "Escape by Night," directed by Roberto Rossellini. Ironically, one of Genn's most recognizable appearances on film was an uncredited one. In 1938's "Pygmalion," he was the dancing partner of Eliza Doolittle (Wendy Hiller) during the Duchess' Ball sequence.

Life Events

Photo Collections

The Miniver Story - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are several photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's The Miniver Story (1950), starring Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon.

Videos

Movie Clip

Green For Danger (1946) - Churchill Telling Lies Nurse Freddi Linley (Sally Gray) doing rounds at the provincial English military hospital, comes upon suave surgeon Eden (Leo Genn), expressing concern about her relations with her fiancè, his junior colleague, when buzz-bombs intrude, followed by the high-strung chief O-R nurse Bates (Judy Campbell) and a delirious patient, parroting what sounds like Nazi radio propaganda, in the dark Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat mystery Green For Danger, 1946.
Green For Danger (1946) - You're In His Way Part of another elaborate set-piece in the Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat production, the hospital dance, Dr Eden (Leo Genn) counsels distraught nurse Esther (Rosamund John) about his ex-lover, her deceased mother, then nurse Bates (Judy Campbell) seethes toward Dr. Barnes (Trevor Howard) whose fianceè nurse Freddi (Sally Gray) becomes his next partner, in Green For Danger, 1946.
Green For Danger (1946) - A Tatty Little Hospital Hop Interlocking exposition in a complex post-operative scene, surgeon Eden (Leo Genn) speaks with the engaged-but-arguing anesthetist Barnes and nurse Linley (Trevor Howard, Sally Gray), then nurse Woods (Megs Jenkins) and overseeing Sister Bates (Judy Campbell), nurse Esther Sanson (Rosamund John) also involved, early in the acclaimed English wartime murder mystery Green For Danger, 1946.
Green For Danger (1946) - He Was The First To Die Alastair Sim narrates as Inspector Cockrill and Moore Marriott features as postman Higgins, followed by a roll call introducing Leo Genn, Megs Jenkins, Rosamund John, Judy Campbell, Sally Gray and Trevor Howard, then Ronald Adam as the administrator Dr. White, all at an English military hospital, in the Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat mystery, in the first production completed at London’s Pinewood Studios after the end of WWII, Green For Danger, 1946.
Green For Danger (1946) - There'll Have To Be An Inquest The new administrator (Ronald Adam as Dr. White) confers with his doctors, Trevor Howard as the anesthetist Barnes, Leo Genn as surgeon Eden and Henry Edwards as Purdy about the unexplained death of the postman, during surgery and a German air raid at a military hospital, in the Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat mystery Green For Danger, 1946.
Ten Little Indians (1966) - What's He Like? Introduced in credits riding up an Alpine tramway, guests Stanley Holloway, Wilfrid Hyde White, Leo Genn, Hugh O'Brian, Dennis Price, Fabian, Shirley Eaton, Daliah Lavi, plus servants Mario Adorf and Marianne Hoppe, begin to chat, in the 1966 version of Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians.
Plymouth Adventure (1952) - We Be Loaded Deep Exhaustive exposition from producer Dore Schary, focused on introducing Leo Genn and Gene Tierney as the Bradfords, Kathleen Lockhart as Mrs. Brewster, John Dehner as Winslow, Van Johnson as Alden, finally Spencer Tracy as Jones, Lloyd Bridges as Coppin, in MGM's Plymouth Adventure, 1952.
Plymouth Adventure (1952) - Or Die In Our Souls... The second ship now out of the picture, Captain Jones (Spencer Tracy) receives the determined Pilgrim spokesman (Leo Genn as Bradford, with Lowell Gilmore and Paul Cavanaugh) and offers new rules, especially regarding their previously incognito fugitive leader Brewster (Barry Jones), in MGM’s Plymouth Adventure, 1952.
Plymouth Adventure (1952) - Hymns And Prayers Should have seen this coming, Captain Jones (Spencer Tracy) has been warning of the ways of sailors, comes home to the Mayflower drunk one evening, finding Dorothy Bradford (Gene Tierney), rescued by her husband (Leo Genn), still in port in England, in Plymouth Adventure, 1952.
Snake Pit, The (1948) - Before It's Too Late Shrink doctor Kik (Leo Genn) with more beaurocratic colleagues (Natalie Shafer as Miss Seifert, Howard Freeman, Frank Conroy, et al) arguing his case in the staff dining hall, in Anatole Litvak's The Snake Pit, 1948.
Snake Pit, The (1948) - Where Do I Sign? Spouse Robert (Mark Stevens) is recounting his marriage and early problems with his wife, now-institutionalized Virginia (Olivia de Havilland) for her psychiatrist Dr. Kik (Leo Genn), early in The Snake Pit, 1948, based on the book by one-time inmate Mary Jane Ward.
Snake Pit, The (1948) - Now Then, Virginia Under examination by a review board and seeking her release, Virginia (Olivia De Havilland) fails to exhibit stability, in Anatole Litvak's 1948 hit The Snake Pit.

Bibliography