Paul Ford


Actor
Paul Ford

About

Also Known As
Paul Ford Weaver
Birth Place
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Born
November 02, 1901
Died
April 12, 1976

Biography

Paul Ford Weaver, who cleaved off his surname to make a two-syllable stage name, was a latecomer to acting notoriety. Despite being a natural performer, Ford initially avoided show business since, like many Americans at the time, he was struggling to make a living and feed his family during the Great Depression. But as the economy began looking up, he decided to plunge into performance a...

Biography

Paul Ford Weaver, who cleaved off his surname to make a two-syllable stage name, was a latecomer to acting notoriety. Despite being a natural performer, Ford initially avoided show business since, like many Americans at the time, he was struggling to make a living and feed his family during the Great Depression. But as the economy began looking up, he decided to plunge into performance and scored bit parts in 1940s movies, largely in dramatic fare such as the 1945 spy thriller "The House on 92nd Street" and the 1949 political saga "All the King's Men." Ford's career really took off in the following decade when he was cast as the buffoonish Colonel Hall, the eternal foil to hero Sergeant Bilko, in the hugely popular sitcom "The Phil Silvers Show." Ford's humorous expressions and expert timing made him an ideal character actor for comedic material, and he excelled in that niche. He appeared in many television series and films until very late in his life. He did a memorable turn as the puzzled mayor in the cheerful adaptation of the con artist musical "The Music Man" in 1962. Ford's last appearance before his death in 1976 was as the voice of Uncle Henry in the animated "Journey Back to Oz," a sequel to the popular book and film "The Wizard of Oz."

Life Events

1944

Broadway actor

1945

Film actor

Videos

Movie Clip

Music Man, The (1962) - Wells Fargo The company starts on Meredith's Willson's tune, an interlude with Mayor and Mrs. Shinn (Paul Ford, Hermione Gingold) and Marian (Shirley Jones), and her brother Winthrop (Ronnie "Ron" Howard) getting his trumpet from Professor Hill (Robert Preston), in The Music Man, 1962.
Music Man, The (1962) - Iowa Stubborn Just arrived on the train from Illinois, after an opening number confirming the disdain of other traveling salesmen for his scorched-earth methods, un-credentialed music professor Henry Hill (Robert Preston) hears from the folk of River City, Io-way about their own predisposition, in the hit Warner Bros. adaptation of the Meredith Willson musical, with Timmy Everett, and Paul Ford as the Mayor, in The Music Man, 1962.
Big Hand For The Little Lady, A - It Must Be A Good Hand! Mary (Joanne Woodward), trying to play her husband's hand, with gamblers (Kevin McCarthy, Jason Robards Jr., Charles Bickford, Robert Middleton) in tow, makes a pitch to banker Ballinger (Paul Ford) in A Big Hand For The Little Lady, 1966.
Advise & Consent (1962) - Widowers And Bachelors Senators Munson (Walter Pidgeon) and Danta (Paul Ford) check in to make sure the president (Franchot Tone) is serious about his nominee for Secretary Of State, before recruiting playboy senator Smith (Peter Lawford), early in Otto Preminger's Advise & Consent, 1962.
Advise & Consent (1962) - It's Worth A Try Senators Munson (Walter Pidgeon) and Danta (Paul Ford) try to get Leffingwell (Henry Fonda, his first scene), their president's nominee for Secretary Of State, on the phone, his son (Eddie Hodges) taking the call, in Otto Preminger's Advise & Consent, 1962.
Advise & Consent (1962) - Cockpit Of Angry Emotion Director Otto Preminger's view of the U.S. Senate in session, senators Munson (Walter Pidgeon), Knox (Edward Andrews), colorful Cooley (Charles Laughton) Danta (Paul Ford) and Smith (Peter Lawford) taking positions on the president's nominee for Secretary of State, in Advise & Consent, 1962.
Comedians, The (1967) - Our Greatest Achievement! Disembarking in Port-au-Prince, evangelical vegeterains the Smiths (Lillian Gish, Paul Ford) and retired "Major" Jones (Alec Guinness), met by Captain Concasseur (Raymond St. Jacques), then a brief appearance by Petit Pierre (Roscoe Lee Browne), early in Graham Greene's The Comedians, 1967
Comedians, The (1967) - Haiti Means Hate! Brown (Richard Burton) delivers the Smiths (Lillian Gish, Paul Ford) and the widow Philipot (Gloria Foster) to the funeral for her activist husband, met by Tonton Macoutes, then by Captain Concasseur (Raymond St. Jacques), in The Comedians, 1967, from Graham Greene's novel and screenplay.

Bibliography