David Farrar


Actor
David Farrar

Biography

Life Events

1932

Stage acting debut

1937

First film as actor

Videos

Movie Clip

Black Narcissus (1947) - You're Slipping Going about business in their Himalayan convent, Sister Superior Ruth (Deborah Kerr) is surprised when local agent Dean (David Farrar) springs Kanchi (Jean Simmons) on her, recruiting Sister Briony (Judith Furse) for support, in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's Black Narcissus, 1947.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Ehrlich Was Like A Fox David Farrar narrates as British naval officer Napier, pursuing John Wayne, as the conflicted Captain Ehrlich of the German steamer Ergenstrasse, trying to avoid capture in the South Pacific in the early days of WWII, as his Nazi spy passenger Elsa (Lana Turner) is approached by his sneaky officer Kirchner (Lyle Bettger), in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Against The New Regime Days before their countries are expected to go to war, British officer Napier (David Farrar) brings his German fiancee' Elsa (Lana Turner) to meet his old family friend, also-German Captain Ehrlich (John Wayne), a former naval officer who refused to become a Nazi, on his freighter docked at Sydney, in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Watusi (1959) - She Wasn't As Lucky Having found a murdered German missionary, and deduced that he had a female companion, Quartermain (George Montgomery) and Cobb (David Farrar) find that the exceptionally stereotyped African “savages” are planning evil acts against Erica (Tania Elg), in MGM’s Watusi, 1959.
Watusi (1959) - Cheated The Vultures Quartermain (George Montgomery as the son of the better-known original explorer, in this sequel), with rescued missionary Erica (Tania Elg) and crusty companion Cobb (David Farrar) survive a stampede, using some footage from MGM’s original King Solomon’s Mines, 1950, in Watusi, 1959.
Watusi (1959) - I Thought You Were A Greenhorn From the opening establishing “Africa, 1919,” with George Montgomery hiking through the savannah, he meets Mohamet (Dan Seymour), then Cobb (David Farrar) and Jim-Jim (Robert Goodwin), and finally introduces himself, in MGM’s semi-sequel to King Solomon’s Mines, 1950, Watusi, 1959.
Black Narcissus (1947) - The Place And The People Not a frame of film shot in Asia, the nuns are reading a voiced-over letter from Mr. Dean (David Farrar) about what they're getting into, early in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's Black Narcissus, 1947.
Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room) -- (1949) - It's A Bit Hush-Hush Second scene introduces David Farrar as the protagonist, weapons expert Sammy in London, 1943, Kathleen Byron as Susan, secretary for his unit, Michael Gough the officer seeking his help, Sid James the barkeep, early in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room), 1949.
Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room) -- (1949) - Have You Ever Fired At A Tank? Not far from London, at Salisbury Plain and Stonehenge, a plausible site for a weapons-testing range, Leslie Banks as Col. Holland, expressing unhappiness with the new gun to expert Sammy (David Farrar), in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room), 1949.
Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room) -- (1949) - Highland Clan Already well into the scene, disabled alcoholic weapons expert Sammy (David Farrar), believing he’s been abandoned by girlfriend Susan (Kathleen Bryon), struggles with his medicine and especially the bottle they’ve been “saving for V-Day,” writer-directors Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger taking it abstract, in Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room), 1949.
Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room) -- (1949) - I Never Nurs'd A Dear Gazelle At a London club ca. 1943, researcher Sammy (David Farrar), who has lost a foot and become an alcoholic, waits for girlfriend and colleague Susan (Kathleen Byron), unsure why she stays with him, turning together to a poem by the Irishman Thomas Moore when an unwelcome friend appears, in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s Hour Of Glory (a.k.a. The Small Back Room), 1949.
Pursuit of the Graf Spee, The - Open, Tigers Arresting narration should surely be credited to Emeric Pressburger, in the opening of the last film by "The Archers," with Michael Powell, The Pursuit of the Graf Spee, 1957, a.k.a. "The Battle of the River Plate."

Family

Barbara Elliot
Daughter

Companions

Irene Elliot
Wife

Bibliography

"No Royal Road"
David Farrar (1948)