Robert Armstrong


Actor
Robert Armstrong

About

Also Known As
Donald Robert Smith
Birth Place
Saginaw, Michigan, USA
Born
November 20, 1890
Died
April 20, 1973

Biography

As the big-time promoter Carl Denham in 1933's "King Kong," Robert Armstrong uttered one of the most famous lines in movie history. "Twas beauty killed the beast," he said at the close of that now iconic film. Although "King Kong " put Armstrong on the map as an actor, it would also cause him to be typecast as a fast-talking promoter in several adventure movies to follow. He played Carl ...

Photos & Videos

Fast Workers - Lobby Card
King Kong - American Movie Posters
The Mad Ghoul - Scene Stills

Biography

As the big-time promoter Carl Denham in 1933's "King Kong," Robert Armstrong uttered one of the most famous lines in movie history. "Twas beauty killed the beast," he said at the close of that now iconic film. Although "King Kong " put Armstrong on the map as an actor, it would also cause him to be typecast as a fast-talking promoter in several adventure movies to follow. He played Carl Denham again in the sequel, "Son of Kong," and was cast in a similar role in 1949's "Mighty Joe Young," which was also about a giant gorilla. In the 1950s Armstrong tried his hand at television. He acted in a series of TV playhouse programs, which were live broadcasts of hour-long dramatic plays, as well as many of the popular television series of the time, including "Lassie" and "Perry Mason." In a career that lasted from 1927 to 1964, Armstrong acted in over a hundred films and television series before succumbing to cancer at the age of 82 in 1973.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

For Those Who Think Young (1964)
Mr. Cronin's business associates
Johnny Cool (1963)
Girl with an Itch (1958)
Ben Cooper
The Crooked Circle (1957)
Al Taylor
The Peacemaker (1956)
Ben Seale
Las Vegas Shakedown (1955)
Doc
Double Jeopardy (1955)
Sam Baggett
The Pace That Thrills (1952)
J. C. Barton
Captain China (1950)
Keegan
Sons of New Mexico (1950)
Pat Feeney
Destination Big House (1950)
Editor Somers
The Lucky Stiff (1949)
Inspector Von Flanagan
Streets of San Francisco (1949)
Lt. Willard Logan
Mighty Joe Young (1949)
Max O'Hara
The Crime Doctor's Diary (1949)
"Goldie" Harrigan
Return of the Bad Men (1948)
Wild Bill Doolin
The Paleface (1948)
Terris
The Sea of Grass (1947)
Floyd McCurtin
The Fugitive (1947)
A sergeant of police
Fall Guy (1947)
Mac McClane
Exposed (1947)
Inspector Prentice
G. I. War Brides (1946)
Dawson
Gay Blades (1946)
"Mac" McManus
Blonde Alibi (1946)
Williams
Decoy (1946)
Frankie Olins
Criminal Court (1946)
Vic Wright
The Falcon in San Francisco (1945)
DeForrest, also known as Duke Monette
Arson Squad (1945)
Capt. Joe Dugan
Gangs of the Waterfront (1945)
Peter Winkly/John "Dutch" Malone
Blood on the Sun (1945)
Col. Tojo
Belle of the Yukon (1944)
George
Mr. Winkle Goes to War (1944)
Joe Tinker
The Navy Way (1944)
Chief Petty Officer Harper
Around the World (1944)
General
Action in Arabia (1944)
Mathew Reed
The Kansan (1943)
Malachy
Wings Over the Pacific (1943)
Pieter Van Bronck
The Mad Ghoul (1943)
Ken McClure
Adventures of the Flying Cadets (1943)
Let's Get Tough! (1942)
Pop Stevens
Baby Face Morgan (1942)
"Doc" Rogers
My Favorite Spy (1942)
[Harry] Robinson
It Happened in Flatbush (1942)
Danny Mitchell
Gang Busters (1942)
Citadel of Crime (1941)
Cal Fullerton
Mr. Dynamite (1941)
Paul
Dive Bomber (1941)
Art Lyons
The Bride Wore Crutches (1941)
Pete
San Francisco Docks (1941)
[Father Mike] Cameron
Sky Raiders (1941)
Enemy Agent (1940)
Gordon
Behind the News (1940)
Vic Archer
Forgotten Girls (1940)
Grover Mullins
Framed (1940)
Skippy
Man of Conquest (1939)
James Bowie
Winter Carnival (1939)
Tiger Reynolds
The Flying Irishman (1939)
Joe Alden
Call a Messenger (1939)
Kirk Graham
Unmarried (1939)
Pins Streaver
Flight at Midnight (1939)
Jim Brennan
There Goes My Heart (1938)
Detective O'Brien
The Night Hawk (1938)
Charlie McCormick
Three Legionnaires (1937)
Sergeant Chuck [Connors]
The Girl Said No (1937)
Jimmie Allen
She Loved a Fireman (1937)
[Captain] Smokey Shannon
It Can't Last Forever (1937)
Al Tinker
Nobody's Baby (1937)
Scoops Hanford
The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)
Nick Martel
Dangerous Waters (1936)
"Dusty" Johnson
All American Chump (1936)
["Honest" William] Hogan
Without Orders (1936)
Wad Madison
Public Enemy's Wife (1936)
Gene Ferguson
The All-American Chump (1936)
Remember Last Night? (1935)
Fred Flannagan
Sweet Music (1935)
Dopey Malone
The Mystery Man (1935)
Lawrence "Larry" Doyle
Little Big Shot (1935)
Steve [Craig]
'G' Men (1935)
Jeff McCord
Gigolette (1935)
Chuck [Ahearn]
Palooka (1934)
Pete Palooka
Manhattan Love Song (1934)
Williams
The Hell Cat (1934)
Dan P. Collins
Flirting with Danger (1934)
Bob Owens
She Made Her Bed (1934)
Duke Gordon
Kansas City Princess (1934)
Dynamite [Carson]
Search for Beauty (1934)
Larry Williams
Fast Workers (1933)
Bucker Reilly
Blind Adventure (1933)
Richard Bruce
The Son of Kong (1933)
[Carl] Denham
The Billion Dollar Scandal (1933)
"Fingers" Partos
Above the Clouds (1933)
Scoop Adams
I Love That Man (1933)
Driller
King Kong (1933)
Carl Denham
Panama Flo (1932)
Babe [Dillon]
Radio Patrol (1932)
Bill Kennedy
The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
Martin [Trowbridge]
The Lost Squadron (1932)
[Lieutenant] Woody [Kerwood]
Penguin Pool Murder (1932)
Barry Costello
Hold 'Em Jail (1932)
The radio announcer
Is My Face Red? (1932)
[Ed] Maloney
The Tip-Off (1931)
Kayo McClure
Iron Man (1931)
George Regan
Suicide Fleet (1931)
Dutch [Herman]
Ex-Bad Boy (1931)
Chester Binney
Be Yourself! (1930)
Jerry Moore
Paid (1930)
Joe Garson
Danger Lights (1930)
Larry Doyle
Big Money (1930)
Ace
Dumbbells in Ermine (1930)
Jerry Malone
The Woman From Hell (1929)
Alf
The Shady Lady (1929)
Blake
The Racketeer (1929)
Keene
Big News (1929)
Steve
Oh, Yeah (1929)
Dude
The Leatherneck (1929)
William Calhoun
Ned McCobb's Daughter (1929)
Babe Callahan
A Girl in Every Port (1928)
Salami
Square Crooks (1928)
Eddie Ellison
Celebrity (1928)
Kid Reagan
The Baby Cyclone (1928)
Gene
The Leopard Lady (1928)
Chris
The Cop (1928)
Scarface Marcas
Show Folks (1928)
Owens
The Main Event (1927)
Red Lucas

Visual Effects (Feature Film)

The Croods (2013)
Visual Effects Supervisor
How to Train Your Dragon (2010)
Visual Effects

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Ghost World (2001)
Other

Cast (Short)

Service with the Colors (1940)
Meet The Fleet (1940)
Pirate Party on Catalina Isle (1935)
Himself
Things You Never See on the Screen (1935)
Himself

Life Events

1927

Film acting debut

Photo Collections

Fast Workers - Lobby Card
Fast Workers - Lobby Card
King Kong - American Movie Posters
Following are several American movie posters from King Kong (1933), both original release and reissue posters. The film was reissued theatrically in the U.S. in 1938, 1946, 1952, and 1956.
The Mad Ghoul - Scene Stills
Here are some scene stills from Universal Pictures' The Mad Ghoul (1943), starring David Bruce, Evelyn Ankers, and George Zucco.
The Mad Ghoul - Lobby Cards
Here are several Lobby Cards from Universal Pictures' The Mad Ghoul (1943). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Racketeer - Title Lobby Card
Here is a Title Card from The Racketeer (1929), starring Robert Armstrong and Carole Lombard. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
King Kong - Publicity Stills
Here are a number of publicity stills of the human cast of RKO's King Kong (1933). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Videos

Movie Clip

Penguin Pool Murder (1932) - That's A Little Vulgar Following a lead, Edna May Oliver as schoolteacher-sleuth Miss Withers engages the sultry sectary (Mary Mason) of the victim, her last barb a reference to the name of a well known women’s tonic, then bumps into maybe-suspicious lawyer Costello (Robert Armstrong) at the cop shop, in the first in the series, Penguin Pool Murder, 1932.
'G' Men (1935) - Now We'll Trade Rights New Justice Department Bureau of Investigation recruit, and ex-lawyer, "Brick" Davis (James Cagney) begins some physical training with boss McCord (Robert Armstrong) and veteran Farrell (Lloyd Nolan), in Warner Bros.' 'G' Men, 1935.
'G' Men (1935) - Keep Your Mouth Shut McCord (Robert Armstrong) is assigned by the chief (Addison Richards) to track down the killer of an agent, he gives the assignment to Davis (James Cagney), who goes to Chicago and catches Leggett (Edward Pawley), in Warner Bros.' 'G' Men, 1935.
King Kong (1933) - Beauty And Beast Filmmaker Carl (Robert Armstrong) inspires Ann (Fay Wray) to some impressive acting for the camera, causing the captain (Frank Reicher) and first mate Jack (Bruce Cabot) further concern regarding what his mysterious movie is really about, en route to Skull Island in the original King Kong, 1933.
Mighty Joe Young (1949) -- Big Gun! Showbiz promoter O'Hara (Robert Armstrong) with African hunter Crawford (Denis Green) and cow-hand turned game wrangler Gregg (Ben Johnson), reviewing their success when Ray Harryhausen's ape makes his first appearance, in Mighty Joe Young, 1949.
Mighty Joe Young (1949) -- Aren't You Afraid? Oklahoman Gregg (Ben Johnson) is kinda romancing new African friend Jill (Terry Moore) when his boss O'Hara (Robert Armstrong) and hunter Crawford (Denis Green) arrive to talk about her ape, in Mighty Joe Young, 1949.
King Kong (1933) - The Thrill Of A Lifetime! Adventure movie-maker Denham (Robert Armstrong) is about to leave New York for the tropics, determined to hire a girl as the love interest for the picture he won't explain for anyone so, with no one willing to take the risk, he finds Fay Wray ("Ann Darrow"), early in the original King Kong, 1933.
King Kong (1933) - The Eighth Wonder! Filmmaker turned exhibitor Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong) at last introduces Kong, along with Ann (Fay Wray), for his New York debut, and it turns out he doesn't like flash bulbs, opening the climax of the original King Kong, 1933.
Lost Squadron, The (1932) - Birds That Were Lost From post-WWI France in 1918, American fliers Gibby (Richard Dix), Woody (Robert Armstrong), Red (Joel McCrea) and mechanic Fritz (Hugh Herbert), to hard times back home, early in The Lost Squadron, 1932, directed by George Archainbaud.
Lost Squadron, The - Act Like Dead! Erich von Stroheim (as "Von Furst") stretching to act like a crazy director, likewise Mary Astor as actress "Follette," Richard Dix (as "Gibby") and Robert Armstrong (as tipsy "Woody") as flying aces in Hollywood, early in The Lost Squadron, 1932.
Most Dangerous Game, The - You Will Be Amused Now a guest of Count Zaroff (Leslie Banks), with Eve (Fay Wray) and her inebriate brother Martin (Robert Armstrong), Bob (Joel McCea) grows curious about what his host likes to hunt, in Merian C. Cooper's The Most Dangerous Game, 1932.
Lost Squadron, The - This Is A War Picture! Von Furst (Erich von Stroheim) directing his big battle scene, drunken Woody (Robert Armstrong) at the controls, wild stunt flying, in director George Archainbaud's The Lost Squadron, 1932.

Trailer

Bibliography