Arthur E. Arling


Director Of Photography

Biography

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

The Making Of A Legend: Gone With The Wind (1988)

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Once Before I Die (1966)
Director of Photography
Ski Party (1965)
Director of Photography
The Secret Invasion (1964)
Director of Photography
Strait-Jacket (1964)
Director of Photography
My Six Loves (1963)
Director of Photography
Boys' Night Out (1962)
Director of Photography
Swingin' Along (1962)
Director of Photography
The Notorious Landlady (1962)
Director of Photography
When the Girls Take Over (1962)
Director of Photography
Lover Come Back (1961)
Director of Photography
The Story of Ruth (1960)
Director of Photography
Take a Giant Step (1960)
Director of Photography
Pillow Talk (1959)
Director of Photography
This Happy Feeling (1958)
Director of Photography
Flood Tide (1958)
Director of Photography
Kathy O' (1958)
Director of Photography
Once Upon a Horse... (1958)
Director of Photography
The Kettles on Old MacDonald's Farm (1957)
Director of Photography
Tammy and the Bachelor (1957)
Director of Photography
Man in the Shadow (1957)
Director of Photography
The Great American Pastime (1956)
Director of Photography
Ransom! (1956)
Director of Photography
I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955)
Director of Photography
The Glass Slipper (1955)
Director of Photography
Love Me or Leave Me (1955)
Director of Photography
Three for the Show (1955)
Director of Photography
Red Garters (1954)
Director of Photography
The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953)
Director of Photography
The I Don't Care Girl (1953)
Director of Photography
Red Skies of Montana (1952)
New Mexico loc Director of Photographer
Belles on Their Toes (1952)
Director of Photography
Meet Me After the Show (1951)
Director of Photography
Call Me Mister (1951)
Director of Photography
Wabash Avenue (1950)
Director of Photography
My Blue Heaven (1950)
Director of Photography
Mother Is a Freshman (1949)
Director of Photography
You're My Everything (1949)
Director of Photography
Captain from Castile (1948)
Director of Photography
The Homestretch (1947)
Director of Photography
The Yearling (1947)
Director of Photography
Gone With the Wind (1939)
Camera Operator
Sweethearts (1938)
Technicolor Camera crew
Doubting Thomas (1935)
Camera Operator
Baby Take a Bow (1934)
Camera Operator
3 on a Honeymoon (1934)
Camera Operator
Una viuda romántica (1933)
2nd Camera
Cavalcade (1933)
2nd Camera
Yo, tú y ella (1933)
Camera Operator
It's Great to Be Alive (1933)
Camera Operator
Life in the Raw (1933)
Camera Operator
She Wanted a Millionaire (1932)
2nd Camera
6 Hours to Live (1932)
Camera Operator
A Passport to Hell (1932)
Camera Operator
Merely Mary Ann (1931)
2nd Camera
Over the Hill (1931)
2nd Camera

Cinematography (Short)

Hollywood Wonderland (1947)
Cinematographer
Scenic Grandeur (1941)
Cinematographer
Mendelssohn's Wedding March (1939)
Cinematographer

Life Events

1927

First film as assistant cameraman

Videos

Movie Clip

Glass Slipper, The (1955) -- (Movie Clip) Goodbye, Cinder Ella! The narrator sounds like Walter Pidgeon because he is, opening the MGM Leslie Caron vehicle, derived from the first published version of Cinderella (1697, by Charles Perrault, Cendrillon ou la petite pantoufle de verre), directed by Charles Walters, music by Bronislau Kaper, dance by Roland Petit for Ballet de Paris, The Glass Slipper, 1955, also starring Michael Wilding.
Glass Slipper, The (1955) -- (Movie Clip) How Cold Is The Water? The prince Charles (Michael Wilding), just returned to “a small European principality,” and pal Kovin (Keenan Wynn) are wandering in the woods at an old favorite site when Leslie Caron, the indignant local tomboy who’s decided she doesn’t mind being called “Cinderella,” shows up with an attitude, their first meeting, in MGM’s The Glass Slipper, 1955.
Glass Slipper, The (1955) -- (Movie Clip) Son Of The Cook More than 40-minutes into the feature, in a sequence dreamed up by servant girl “Ella” (Leslie Caron), who’s been told that Prince Charles (Michael Wilding) is just “the son of the cook of the palace of the duke,” she joins the first dance number, Charles Walters directing, dance by Roland Petit for Ballet de Paris, in MGM’s The Glass Slipper, 1955.
I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955) -- (Movie Clip) We Did What? Newly happy and confident now that she's using alcohol to cope with grief over the death of her first husband, singer Lillian Roth (Susan Hayward) on a wild date with soldier Wallie (Don Taylor), whom she scarcely knows, in I'll Cry Tomorrow, 1955.
I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955) -- (Movie Clip) Sing You Sinners Grand entrance for Susan Hayward, as the now grown-up Lillian Roth, in Hollywood shooting the number "Sing, You Sinners" by W. Franke Harling and Sam Coslow, as made famous by the real Roth in Honey, 1930, Jo Van Fleet her preening mother, in I'll Cry Tomorrow, 1955.
I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955) -- (Movie Clip) Adorable Drunk Losing her grip again, now in the thrall of her money-grubbing third husband Tony (Richard Conte), singer Lillian Roth (Susan Hayward) has an incident in an LA bar, in I'll Cry Tomorrow, 1955.
Lover Come Back (1961) -- (Movie Clip) It Looks Down On Madison Avenue Carol (Doris Day) has forced a hearing before the Madison Avenue ethics-enforcing “Advertising Council,” not knowing that her target, Jerry Webster (Rock Hudson, not seen) has tricked her witness, dishy model Rebel (Edie Adams) into hiding his dubious practices, in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Pillow Talk (1959) -- (Movie Clip) Title Song Cute graphics, the leading lady with the title tune by Buddy Pepper and Inez James, to Doris Day in the blue negligee and leading man Rock Hudson introducing the premise and the graphic gimmick, off to a rollicking start in their first picture together, in Pillow Talk, 1959.
Lover Come Back (1961) -- (Movie Clip) I Wish I Were A Man Right Now! Ad man Jerry (Rock Hudson) is managing his neurotic boss and buddy Peter (Tony Randall), legacy owner of the agency, who's worried that competitor Carol (Doris Day) has filed a complaint, director Delbert Mann using the split-screen phone gimmick from Pillow Talk, 1959, early in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Pillow Talk (1959) -- (Movie Clip) Has He Made Immoral Overtures? Joining infuriated party-line customer Jan (Doris Day), we meet her ever hung-over maid Alma (Thelma Ritter) then the phone company man (Hayden Rorke), following just the first encounter with the leading man (Rock Hudson) she hasn't yet met, in Pillow Talk, 1959.
Lover Come Back (1961) -- (Movie Clip) Until I See Him Sober Nearly 45 minutes into the movie, the stars on screen together for the firs time, Doris Day as ad-gal Carol reasonably presumes that bearded Rock Hudson, playing her rival Jerry, is actually the chemist Tyler, inventor of the so-far non-existent product “VIP,” implications abounding, in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Lover Come Back (1961) -- (Movie Clip) Open, Title Song The leading lady delivers the bouncy title song by Frank De Vol and Alan Spilton, resonant early 1960's graphics, opening director Delbert Mann's much-praised romantic comedy Lover Come Back, 1961, starring Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Tony Randall.

Bibliography