Philip Dunne


Director, Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
February 11, 1908
Died
June 04, 1992
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

Philip Dunne was one of the deans of Hollywood screenwriters from the 1930s into the 60s, scripting many a number of first-rate productions including "How Green Was My Valley" (1941), "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" (1947) and "The Robe" (1953). Directing from 1954, Dunne turned out a series of smoothly crafted, finely acted dramas, notably "Hilda Crane" (1956), the teen angst classic "Blue De...

Family & Companions

Amanda Duff
Wife
Actor. Married in 1939.

Bibliography

"Take Two"
Philip Dunne, McGraw-Hill (1980)
"Mr. Dooley Remembers"
Philip Dunne, Atlantic/Little, Brown (1963)

Biography

Philip Dunne was one of the deans of Hollywood screenwriters from the 1930s into the 60s, scripting many a number of first-rate productions including "How Green Was My Valley" (1941), "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" (1947) and "The Robe" (1953). Directing from 1954, Dunne turned out a series of smoothly crafted, finely acted dramas, notably "Hilda Crane" (1956), the teen angst classic "Blue Denim" (1959) and the suspense-filled "Lisa" (1962). Dunne began his writing career after taking a brief stab as a banker. His first produced credit was "Student Tour" (1934), more remembered for the sight of Betty Grable swimming in front of the Taj Mahal than for its substantive content. But that same year, Dunne adapted "The Count of Monte Cristo" for the screen, and was on his way to a prestige career. His 1936 adaptation of "The Last of the Mohicans" may not have been entirely true to the book, but it remains a classic. Dunne received his first Academy Award nomination for the true classic "How Green Was My Valley" (1941), his second for "David and Bathsheba" (1951). His "The Ghost of Mrs. Muir" adaptation sparked a franchise, and "Pinky" (1949) starred Jeanne Crain as a high-yellow African American passing for white and remains, however dated, one of the classics of the post World War II cycle of socially-conscious Hollywood films, alongside "Crossfire" and "Gentleman's Agreement." His work in the 50s and 60s as a screenwriter often went towards epics, including "The Agony and the Ecstasy" about Michelangelo, and "The Robe." In 1997, it was determined that he had written the latter with blacklisted writer Albert Maltz, who would heretofore share screen credit. Dunne was not blacklisted himself, but he was involved with so-called left-wing and liberal causes and served as a speech writer on the presidential campaigns of Adlai Stevenson and John F. Kennedy.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Blindfold (1966)
Director
Lisa (1962)
Director
Wild in the Country (1961)
Director
Blue Denim (1959)
Director
Ten North Frederick (1958)
Director
In Love and War (1958)
Director
Three Brave Men (1957)
Director
Hilda Crane (1956)
Director
The View from Pompey's Head (1955)
Director
Prince of Players (1955)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

The Big Show (1957)

Writer (Feature Film)

The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
From Story
The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Story By
Blindfold (1966)
Screenwriter
The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965)
Screen story & Screenplay
Forbid Them Not (1962)
Narr
Blue Denim (1959)
Screenwriter
Ten North Frederick (1958)
Screenwriter
Three Brave Men (1957)
Writer
Hilda Crane (1956)
Screenwriter
The View from Pompey's Head (1955)
Written for Screen by
Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954)
Writer
The Egyptian (1954)
Screenwriter
The Robe (1953)
Screenwriter
Way of a Gaucho (1952)
Screenwriter
Lydia Bailey (1952)
Screenwriter
O. Henry's Full House (1952)
Screenplay of "The Gift of the Magi"
David and Bathsheba (1951)
Written for Screen by
Anne of the Indies (1951)
Screenwriter
Pinky (1949)
Screenwriter
That Wonderful Urge (1949)
Contract Writer
Escape (1948)
Screenwriter
The Luck of the Irish (1948)
Screenwriter
The Late George Apley (1947)
Screenwriter
Forever Amber (1947)
Screenwriter
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947)
Screenwriter
Kiss of Death (1947)
Wrt of addl scenes
Son of Fury (1942)
Screenwriter
How Green Was My Valley (1941)
Screenwriter
Johnny Apollo (1940)
Screenwriter
Swanee River (1940)
Screenwriter
Stanley and Livingstone (1939)
Screenwriter
The Rains Came (1939)
Screenwriter
Suez (1938)
Screenwriter
Lancer Spy (1937)
Screenwriter
Breezing Home (1937)
Original Story
The Last of the Mohicans (1936)
Screenwriter
Magnificent Obsession (1936)
Contract Writer
King of Burlesque (1936)
Contract Writer
The Melody Lingers On (1935)
Screenplay and dial
Under Pressure (1935)
Revisions
The Count of Monte Cristo (1934)
Screenplay and dial
Student Tour (1934)
Screenwriter
Helldorado (1934)
Contr on Special seq
Eat 'Em Alive (1933)
Dial
Me and My Gal (1932)
Contract Writer

Producer (Feature Film)

The View from Pompey's Head (1955)
Producer
Prince of Players (1955)
Producer
Way of a Gaucho (1952)
Producer

Music (Feature Film)

The Robe (1953)
Composer
Way of a Gaucho (1952)
Composer

Life Events

1934

Feature screenwriting debut (with Ralph Spence), "Student Tour"

1936

Had first major success, "The Last of the Mohicans"

1941

Wrote classic "How Green Was My Valley"

1943

Served as Chief of Production for the Office of War Information, Overseas Branch, supervising films by directors including Jean Renoir, Garson Kanin, Josef von Sternberg and Willard Van Dyke

1951

Earned second Academy Award nomination for "David and Bathsheba"

1952

Worked as speech writer for Adlai Stevenson (and again during 1956 campaign)

1952

First film as producer, "Way of a Gaucho"

1954

Feature film directing debut, "Prince of Players"

1960

Worked as speech writer for John F Kennedy during presidential campaign

1966

Wrote and directed final film, "Blindfold"

1997

Posthumous credit for co-writing "The Robe" (1953) given to Albert Maltz

Videos

Movie Clip

Robe, The (1953) - We'll Both Need Friends Sent on a hurried mission to Palestine, having offended the emperor's heir, Roman officer Gallio (Richard Burton) with new slave Demetrius (Victor Mature) and Diana (Jean Simmons), the childhood sweetheart with whom he's just re-united, in the landmark wide-screen hit The Robe, 1953.
Blue Denim (1959) - What's Wrong With The Boy? From the credits, we meet second-billed Brandon De Wilde as teen Arthur, coming home to bad news from his dad (MacDonald Carey), while his mother (Marsha Hunt) and sister (Nina Shipman) fuss over her date, in Blue Denim, 1958, also starring Carol Lynley, based on a play by James Leo Herlihy and William Noble.
Blue Denim (1959) - Break The Bottle Over Your Head Frustrated teen Arthur (Brandon De Wilde) has adjourned to his family’s basement with his more-wayward pal Ernie (Warren Berlinger) for decadent pursuits when they’re surprised by tomboy-ish Janet (Carol Lynley, her first scene), in the Twentieth Century-Fox melodrama Blue Denim, 1958.
Blue Denim (1959) - They're Engaged, For Pete's Sake! Arthur (Brandon De Wilde) is practicing his missed shot that would have won the game when swooning Janet (Carol Lynley) proposes a walk home together, just days since their first kiss, interrupted by his sister and boyfriend (Nina Shipman, Buck Class), in Blue Denim, 1958.
Forever Amber (1947) - I Make No Claim On Your Freedom In London to petition king Charles Stuart for privateering ships, noblemen Bruce (Cornel Wilde) and Harry (Richard Greene) are irritated to discover the impetuous Puritan girl they met in the countryside (Linda Darnell, the title character) in their rooms, in the extravagant Technicolor historical melodrama Forever Amber, 1947.
Forever Amber (1947) - Never Lead With The Ace Queen Summoned late at night to Whitehall by the king Charles Stuart (George Sanders), Carlton (Cornel Wilde), with sidekick Harry (Richard Greene), infers that the monarch has chosen to grant him the ships he wants, to keep him away from his own paramour Barbara (Natalie Draper), with whom he plays Piquet, in Otto Preminger’s Forever Amber, 1947.
Forever Amber (1947) - You Didn't Tell Me You Had An Uncle Clever shooting by director Otto Preminger, as Linda Darnell (title character) is now a London actress, pursued by wealthy Radcliffe (Richard Haydn), attended by her fellow former prisoner Nan (Jessica Tandy), thrilled to see old pal Harry (Richard Greene), who upsets her current sponsor Morgan (Glenn Langan), in Forever Amber, 1947.
Forever Amber (1947) - England Is Aflame Producer Darryl Zanuck and director Otto Preminger attempt the rare double-prologue, leading to the rural Puritan household of Leo G. Carroll, and top-billed Linda Darnell as the already rebellious title character, in the multi-million dollar 20th Century-Fox production from the Kathleen Winsor novel, Forever Amber, 1947.
Forever Amber (1947) - Both Alike In Dignity Now in London in her first fancy frock, Amber (Linda Darnell) is now involved with nobleman Bruce (Cornel Wilde), and with pal Harry (Richard Greene) they attend Shakespeare, where they spy Natalie Draper as Barbara, and see an opportunity to solicit King Charles (George Sanders) for ships, and fail badly, in Darryl F. Zanuck’s Forever Amber1947.
O. Henry's Full House (1952) - The Gift Of The Magi The first scene for the stars of the last story, Jeanne Crain and Farley Granger as impecunious New Yorkers Della and Jim Young, directed by Henry King in probably the author’s most famous work, The Gift Of The Magi, from O. Henry’s Full House, 1952.
Rains Came, The (1939) - Cast Iron Petticoat From the opening scene, Brit artist Ransome (George Brent) and local doctor Major Safti (Tyrone Power) discuss the former's inertia and the state of contemporary India, a missionary mother and daughter (Marjorie Rambeau, Brenda Joyce) visiting, in The Rains Came, 1939, co-starring Myrna Loy.
Rains Came, The (1939) - Have You Become Fond Of Money? Ransome (George Brent), an idle British painter long resident in a fictional Indian state, chats with Lady Edwina (Myrna Loy), after having discovered to their mutual surprise that she, the wife of a visiting lord, is also his old flame, in The Rains Came, 1939, also starring Tyrone Power.

Trailer

Family

Finley Peter Dunne
Father
Humorist.
Margaret Ives Dunne
Mother
Competed in the Olympics as a golfer.
Phillipa Dunne
Daughter
Miranda Dunne
Daughter
Jessica Dunne
Daughter

Companions

Amanda Duff
Wife
Actor. Married in 1939.

Bibliography

"Take Two"
Philip Dunne, McGraw-Hill (1980)
"Mr. Dooley Remembers"
Philip Dunne, Atlantic/Little, Brown (1963)