Laird Doyle


Biography

Laird Doyle was known for his creative screenwriting skills. Doyle's career beginnings can be traced back to writing for films such as "The Phantom Express" (1932), the Robert Montgomery action movie "Hell Below" (1933) and "Bordertown" (1934). He also appeared in "British Agent" (1934) with Leslie Howard. Nearing the end of his career, Doyle wrote the Marion Davies musical comedy "...

Biography

Laird Doyle was known for his creative screenwriting skills. Doyle's career beginnings can be traced back to writing for films such as "The Phantom Express" (1932), the Robert Montgomery action movie "Hell Below" (1933) and "Bordertown" (1934). He also appeared in "British Agent" (1934) with Leslie Howard. Nearing the end of his career, Doyle wrote the Marion Davies musical comedy "Cain and Mabel" (1936), "Hearts Divided" (1936) and "Three Men on a Horse" (1936). He also appeared in "Another Dawn" (1937) and the adventure "The Prince and the Pauper" (1937) with Bobby Mauch. Doyle was most recently credited in the adventure "Northwest Outpost" (1947) with Nelson Eddy. Doyle passed away in November 1936 at the age of 29.

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Special Agent (1935) - She's Dynamite After an opening with a federal officer lecturing agents about busting gangsters for unpaid taxes, we meet one noted target, Ricardo Cortez as Carston, with his unexpected companion bookkeeper Julie (Bette Davis), with a nifty shot at the arcade, William Keighley directing, in Warner Bros.’ Special Agent, 1935.
Special Agent (1935) - Ink On My Nose Again? We know George Brent as Bill is really a federal revenue agent, but Bette Davis, as the notably good-natured Julie, top accountant for gangster Carston, buys his cover as a newspaper man, so their romantic sparring feels pretty natural, in the second of their twelve pictures together, Special Agent, 1935.
Special Agent (1935) - I'm Just A Big Strong Girl Paul Guilfoyle is a mole from the DA’s office, granted admittance by increasingly uncomfortable bookkeeper and girl-Friday Julie (Bette Davis) to see her boss, gangster Carston (Ricardo Cortez), her friend Bill (George Brent, posing as a reporter, though we know he’s really a cop) close behind, in Special Agent, 1935.
Key, The (1934) - There's A Character In Dickens Hard to make a better scene for a William Powell entrance, as British officer Bill Tenant, arriving in 1920 Dublin, Arthur Aylesworth his aide, Dawn O’Day (actually the young Anne Shirley) the flower girl, and Arthur Treacher flakking for the general, Halliwell Hobbes, who is secretly an old pal, early in The Key, 1934.
Key, The (1934) - What Makes You Think I'm English? Terrific craft with Michael Curtiz directing, William Powell as Brit officer Bill newly detailed to 1920 Dublin, feeling wistful over an old flame, hiding his uniform under a legit Ulster coat, meets a sly barmaid (Gertude Short) and inquisitive O’Duffy (J.M. Kerrigan), in The Key, 1934.
Key, The (1934) - Fancy Me Forgetting You? Deciding to take a room because of a tune heard upstairs, Willliam Powell as British officer Bill, newly assigned to Dublin, 1920, finds out his neighbors are old friend Andy (Colin Clive), an intelligence officer, and wife Norah (Edna Best), whom he also knows, in The Key, 1934.
Jimmy The Gent (1934) - I Love Your Enthusiasm The criminal underbelly of a big-city hospital, medical staff (Mary Treen the nurse, Philip Faversham the intern on the phone) sharing word of a loaded corpse, intercepted by Philip Reed, relaying the call to second-billed Bette Davis, who works for slick Alan Dinehart, in Jimmy The Gent, 1934, starring James Cagney.
Jimmy The Gent (1934) - I'm Liable To Catch Something The first scene together for two Warner Bros. titans in the first of only two pictures they made together, Bette Davis as Joanie, we learn, is a former associate, now working for a rival, of James Cagney as Corrigan, a scrappy competitor in the unclaimed-inheritance business in Jimmy The Gent, 1934.
Jimmy The Gent (1934) - He's Sore As A Boil After a blazing Warner Bros. opening of fatal accidents and headlines of vast fortunes with no heirs, director Michael Curtiz enters the office of the title character, Renee Whitney and Merna Kennedy taking flak for James Cagney, who tears into sidekick Allen Jenkins, in Jimmy The Gent, 1934.
Dangerous (1935) - I'll Never Forget Her Farnsworth (Walter Walker) meets ex-actress Joyce Heath (Bette Davis) then tells his club pals, including architect Don (Franchot Tone), about it, with Richard Carle as the incidental columnist Hanley, in the opening of Dangerous, 1935.
Dangerous (1935) - My Dismal Scene Well-to-do Don (Franchot Tone), who separated himself from his party after he noticed ex-actress Joyce (Bette Davis), whom he has long idolized, in a Manhattan dive, returns to introduce himself, early in Dangerous, 1935.
British Agent (1934) - This Red Millenium Days after the Bolshevik coup in Petrograd, stranded British diplomat Locke (Leslie Howard), charged with placating the new government, meets charming militant Elena (Kay Francis), whom he rescued earlier, in British Agent, 1934.

Bibliography