Paul Douglas


Paul Douglas

About

Born
April 11, 1907
Died
September 11, 1959

Biography

With his husky build and gruff delivery, actor Paul Douglas was an unlikely choice for a leading man in 1950s Hollywood. A one-time professional footballer and radio sports commentator, Douglas began his acting career on the Broadway stage, earning rave reviews for his performance as tycoon Harry Brock in the original 1946 production of Garson Kanin's "Born Yesterday." He quickly made th...

Photos & Videos

A Letter to Three Wives - Lobby Cards
The Mating Game - Scene Stills
Executive Suite - Group Publicity Stills

Biography

With his husky build and gruff delivery, actor Paul Douglas was an unlikely choice for a leading man in 1950s Hollywood. A one-time professional footballer and radio sports commentator, Douglas began his acting career on the Broadway stage, earning rave reviews for his performance as tycoon Harry Brock in the original 1946 production of Garson Kanin's "Born Yesterday." He quickly made the transition to feature films in 1949, appearing as the pragmatic Porter Hollingsway in director Joseph L. Mankiewicz's witty social comedy "A Letter to Three Wives" (1949). But Douglas found his true niche in baseball films, and drew upon its explosive personalities to essay loud-mouthed yet ultimately good-natured characters such as catcher Monk Lanigan (1949's "It Happens Every Spring") and manager "Guffy" McGovern (1951's "Angels in the Outfield"). While he continued to be a popular draw for moviegoers well into the 1950s, Douglas made his biggest impact on television later in his career, with memorable guest appearances on programs like "The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour" and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," among others. On September 11, 1959, just days after being cast as Jeff Sheldrake on director Billy Wilder's classic 1960 comedy "The Apartment," Paul Douglas died of a heart attack. Douglas's part ultimately went to actor Fred MacMurray.

Life Events

Photo Collections

A Letter to Three Wives - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from Fox's A Letter to Three Wives (1949). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Mating Game - Scene Stills
Here are a few scene stills from The Mating Game (1959), starring Debbie Reynolds and Tony Randall.
Executive Suite - Group Publicity Stills
Here is a series of publicity stills taken of the all-star cast of Executive Suite (1954). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Angels in the Outfield - Publicity Stills
Here are a number of stills taken to help publicize MGM's Angels in the Outfield (1951), starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
It Happens Every Spring - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Fox's It Happens Every Spring (1949), starring Ray Milland. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Gamma People - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from Columbia Pictures' The Gamma People (1956). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Green Fire - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes during location shooting (in Columbia, South America) of MGM's Green Fire (1954), starring Grace Kelly, Stewart Granger, and Paul Douglas.
Fourteen Hours - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from Fox's Fourteen Hours (1951), starring Paul Douglas and Richard Basehart. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

Mating Game, The (1959) - Open, My Place Paul Douglas, playing "Pop Larkin," narrates the opening, leading to co-star Debbie Reynolds singing the title tune, in The Mating Game, 1959, also starring Tony Randall.
Mating Game, The (1959) - Under My Skin Without warning, auditor Lorenzo (Tony Randall), given a "special" drink, leaps into Cole Porter's "Under My Skin," baffling Mariette (Debbie Reynolds), her family, and his boss (Fred Clark) in The Mating Game, 1959.
Panic In The Streets (1950) - Just To Be Important Struggling to contain pneumonic plague in New Orleans, military public health official Reed (Richard Widmark) tries to find common cause with cop Warren (Paul Douglas) who’s not convinced of the emergency and wants to use conventional police tactics, in Panic In The Streets, 1950, directed by Elia Kazan.
Panic In The Streets (1950) - You Can Take Me At My Word Joining a scene in which uniformed Public Health Service doctor Reed (Richard Widmark) is trying to tell the New Orleans mayor (H. Waller Fowler Jr.), police commissioner (Val Winter) and detective Warren (Paul Douglas) how to deal with a murder victim who had pneumonic plauge, early in Elia Kazan’s Panic In The Streets, 1950.
Green Fire (1955) - Open, 1687 Opening credits and engineer Mitchell (Stewart Granger) discovering mineral clues, then getting spooked, in MGM's South American adventure Green Fire, 1955, co-starring Grace Kelly and Paul Douglas.
Green Fire (1955) - Thinking Like A Woman Beautiful when angry and on horseback, Cathy (Grace Kelly) tells off brother Don (John Ericson) and emerald mine partners Vic (Paul Douglas) and Rian (Stewart Granger) in MGM's Green Fire, 1955.
This Could Be The Night (1958) - College Girl From Smith's Manhattan schoolteacher Anne (Jean Simmons) applying for a night club job with Rocco (Paul Douglas), Hussein (Rafael Campos) attending, Patsy (Neile Adams) dropping by and co-owner Tony (Anthony Franciosa) signing off, early in Robert Wise's This Could Be The Night, 1958.
Angels In The Outfield (1951) - Another Holocaust In Forbes Field Opening shot at the real Forbes Field in Pittsburgh introduces the leads, Paul Douglas as grumpy manager McGovern, Janet Leigh, narrating, as not-sports reporter Jennifer, finishing with Keenan Wynn as duly annoyed sportswriter Bayles, in MGM’s Angels In The Outfield, 1951.
Angels In The Outfield (1951) - Get Her Out Of The Sun Reporter Jennifer (Janet Leigh) narrating, manager McGovern (Paul Douglas) trying his new Shakespeare-augmented griping technique, Sister Edwitha (Spring Byington) escorting orphan Bridget (Donna Corcoran), in Angels In The Outfield, 1951.
Clash By Night - Guard Your Castle Newly divorced and not holding his liquor, Earl (Robert Ryan) visits Jerry (Paul Douglas) and Mae (Barbara Stanwyck) at their steamy Monterey home, in Fritz Lang's Clash By Night, 1952, from Clifford Odets' play.
Clash By Night (1952) - You Don't Like Women, Do You? Socially clumsy Monterey fisherman Jerry (Paul Douglas), a long-time admirer of Mae (Barbara Stanwyck) who’s back in town after ten years, has persuaded her to take in a movie, and is eager to introduce his cooler pal, projectionist Earl (Robert Ryan), with mixed results, in Fritz Lang’s Clash By Night, 1952.
Clash By Night (1952) - Busy Making Honey Nasty Earl (Robert Ryan) leers at volatile couple Peggy (Marilyn Monroe) and Joe (Keith Andes) on the Monterey beach, drawing her interest, then impresses his pal Jerry (Paul Douglas) more than his date Mae (Barbara Stanwyck), in Clash By Night, 1952, from a Clifford Odets play.

Trailer

Bibliography