Gordon Douglas


Director
Gordon Douglas

About

Also Known As
Gordon M. Douglas
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
December 15, 1907
Died
September 30, 1993
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

Before he was a well-respected film director, Gordon Douglas was a lowly teenage production intern whose go-getter attitude convinced his boss, famed media mogul Hal Roach, to cast him in the youthfully mischievous short-film series "Our Gang." Already too old to join the central Little Rascals, he was instead given a succession of bit parts. In short order, he gleaned a thorough enough ...

Biography

Before he was a well-respected film director, Gordon Douglas was a lowly teenage production intern whose go-getter attitude convinced his boss, famed media mogul Hal Roach, to cast him in the youthfully mischievous short-film series "Our Gang." Already too old to join the central Little Rascals, he was instead given a succession of bit parts. In short order, he gleaned a thorough enough sense of the series' ins and outs to take on writing and directing roles, eventually emerging as "Gang"'s most dedicated (and prosperous) overseer, even going so far as to follow the eternally celebrated franchise when it moved to MGM. He ultimately realized, however, that he much preferred the homespun stylings of Roach's studio, and he returned there, sans Rascals, to find further success as the director of such freewheeling comedies as the gleefully daft Laurel and Hardy adventure "Saps at Sea" (1940). A skilled features director by the time Hal Roach Studios folded altogether, he found a new permanent residence at Warner Bros. in 1950. Over the course of the following three decades, Douglas spread his wings as a multi-genre filmmaker, directing the quintessential atomic-age creeper "Them!" before making a distinct move toward savvier, more sophisticated projects such as the hard-edged detective dramas "They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!" and the forthrightly titled "The Detective." He retired from the business in 1977 and died of cancer years later at the age of 85.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Viva Knievel! (1977)
Director
Nevada Smith (1975)
Director
Slaughter 2 (1973)
Director
Slaughter's Big Rip-Off (1973)
Director
Skin Game (1971)
Fill-In Director
Skullduggery (1970)
Director
Barquero (1970)
Director
They Call Me MISTER Tibbs (1970)
Director
The Detective (1968)
Director
Lady in Cement (1968)
Director
In Like Flint (1967)
Director
Chuka (1967)
Director
Tony Rome (1967)
Director
Stagecoach (1966)
Director
Way ... Way Out (1966)
Director
Sylvia (1965)
Director
Harlow (1965)
Director
Rio Conchos (1964)
Director
Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964)
Director
Call Me Bwana (1963)
Director
Follow That Dream (1962)
Director
Gold of the Seven Saints (1961)
Director
Claudelle Inglish (1961)
Director
The Sins of Rachel Cade (1961)
Director
Up Periscope (1959)
Director
Yellowstone Kelly (1959)
Director
The Fiend Who Walked the West (1958)
Director
Fort Dobbs (1958)
Director
Bombers B-52 (1957)
Director
The Big Land (1957)
Director
Santiago (1956)
Director
The McConnell Story (1955)
Director
Sincerely Yours (1955)
Director
Them! (1954)
Director
Young at Heart (1954)
Director
The Eddie Cantor Story (1954)
Director
She's Back on Broadway (1953)
Director
So This Is Love (1953)
Director
The Charge at Feather River (1953)
Director
The Iron Mistress (1952)
Director
Mara Maru (1952)
Director
Come Fill the Cup (1951)
Director
I Was a Communist for the F.B.I. (1951)
Director
The Great Missouri Raid (1951)
Director
Only the Valiant (1951)
Director
Rogues of Sherwood Forest (1950)
Director
Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (1950)
Director
The Nevadan (1950)
Director
Between Midnight and Dawn (1950)
Director
Fortunes of Captain Blood (1950)
Director
The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949)
Director
Mr. Soft Touch (1949)
Director
Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)
Director
The Black Arrow (1948)
Director
If You Knew Susie (1948)
Director
San Quentin (1946)
Director
Dick Tracy vs. Cueball (1946)
Director
Zombies on Broadway (1945)
Director
First Yank into Tokyo (1945)
Director
The Falcon in Hollywood (1944)
Director
A Night of Adventure (1944)
Director
Gildersleeve's Ghost (1944)
Director
Girl Rush (1944)
Director
Gildersleeve on Broadway (1943)
Director
Gildersleeve's Bad Day (1943)
Director
The Great Gildersleeve (1942)
Director
The Devil with Hitler (1942)
Director
Broadway Limited (1941)
Director
Niagara Falls (1941)
Director
Road Show (1941)
Associate Director
Saps at Sea (1940)
Director
A Chump at Oxford (1940)
Director of addl scenes
Zenobia (1939)
Director
Captain Fury (1939)
2nd Unit Director
General Spanky (1936)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Mystery of Edwin Drood (1935)
Coroner

Writer (Feature Film)

Topper Returns (1941)
Original Screenplay
The Housekeeper's Daughter (1939)
Screenwriter
Kelly the Second (1936)
Adaptation

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

The Terminal Man (1974)
Other

Director (Short)

Aladdin's Lantern (1938)
Director
The Little Ranger (1938)
Director
Hearts are Thumps (1937)
Director
Rushin' Ballet (1937)
Director
Our Gang Follies of 1938 (1937)
Director
Bored of Education (1936)
Director
Two Too Young (1936)
Director

Cast (Short)

Love Pains (1932)
Birthday Blues (1932)
The Knockout (1932)
Too Many Women (1932)
You're Telling Me (1932)
Love Fever (1931)
On the Loose (1931)
One Good Turn (1931)
The Rap (1931)
Chickens Come Home- (1931)
The Kick-Off! (1931)
Come Clean (1931)
Looser Than Loose (1930)

Life Events

1936

First short film as director ("Our Gang" comedies)

1936

Feature film co-directing debut with "General Spanky"

1939

First feature film as sole director

Photo Collections

Them! - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from Them! (1954). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
First Yank Into Tokyo - Movie Poster
Here is an original release movie poster from RKO's First Yank Into Tokyo (1945), starring Tom Neal. This is an Insert poster, measuring 14 x 36 inches.

Videos

Movie Clip

Gildersleeve On Broadway (1943) - I'm Studying Your Technique Throckmorton (Harold Peary, title character and star of the coincident NBC radio series), persuaded that he needs to woo the forthright New York gold-digger Francine (Claire Carleton) away from his niece’s boyfriend, encourages her mistaken belief that he’s rich, and impresses the window washer (Leonid Kinskey), in RKO’s third feature in the series, Gildersleeve On Broadway, 1943.
Gildersleeve On Broadway (1943) - Take The Hand Of Your Beloved Opening (Frank Dawson as the preacher in idyllic Summerfield) with Uncle Throckmorton (Harold Peary, title character and also star of the NBC radio sitcom) with nephew Leroy (Freddie Mercer), ogling Ann Doran as Matlida, annoying teenage niece Marjie (Margaret Landry, replacing Nancy Gates), in the third feature in the RKO series, Gildersleeve On Broadway, 1943.
Great Gildersleeve, The (1942) - That Female Man Trap! Title character (Harold Peavy) is hiding in the basement (visited by Lillian Randolph as Birdie) to avoid aggressive spinster Amelia (Mary Field), who’s made an unwelcome house call on singing pupil Leroy (Freddie Mercer, a highly trained singer, doing his own vocal, on an aria often sung by Enrico Caruso), who’s sort-of rescued by sister Margie (Nancy Gates) and her band, early in the first feature in the RKO series, The Great Gildersleeve, 1942.
Gildersleeve's Bad Day (1943) - A Man Who Don't Like Ducks Through contrivance by niece and nephew Margie and Leroy (Nancy Gates, Freddie Mercer), title character “Uncle Morty” (Harold Peary) and the jury are dining at his place, Birdie and aunt Emma (Lillian Randolph, Jane Darwell) serving, Alex Christy the bailiff, Richard LeGrand as Peavy, and semi-crooked George (Harold Landon) on the phone, in GIlderseeve’s Bad Day, 1943.
Gildersleeve's Bad Day (1943) - Save Some Of The Pep! Troublesome laundry delivery guy George (Harold Landon) bothers Peanuts (Jimmy Clemons Jr.) and Leroy (Freddie Mercer) to get at Margie (Nancy Gates), getting ready to open the canteen, prying her from Jimmy (Russell Wade) as he advances the plot to bribe the jury on which their uncle, the title character, is serving, in the second movie in the RKO series, GIlderseeve’s Bad Day, 1943.
Great Gildersleeve, The (1942) - Saves Rubber And Gas! Headed to the train to pick up Aunt Emma (Jane Darwell) to help convince the court he can take care of the kids, the title character (Harold Peary) finds Leroy (Freddie Mercer) has wasted the gas, and Birdie (Lillian Randolph) can’t help, but there’s another vehicle handy, in The Great Gildersleeve, 1942.
Great Gildersleeve, The (1942) - Biggest Man In Summerfield The orphan kids (Nancy Gates and Freddie Mercer as niece and nephew Margie and Leroy) don’t want to be separated by Judge Hooker (Charles Arnt) from their uncle, the title character (Harold Peary) so they decide to mount an aimless campaign, using his own hobby printing press, on his behalf, in the first movie in the RKO series based on the NBC radio sit-com, The Great Gildersleeve, 1942.
Gildersleeve's Bad Day (1943) - I'm No Groundhog, Brother! Rapid exposition, Otis (Dink Trout) is serving summons and arrives at the Gildersleeve’s house where Margie (Nancy Gates) and the gals (Barbara Hale et al) are fundraising, while Birdie (Lillian Randolph) serves and the title character (Harold Peary) and Leroy (Freddie Mercer) are busy in the basement (again!) in RKO’s second feature in the series, GIldersleeve’s Bad Day, 1943.
Big Land, The (1957) -- I Leaned On A Man With a vocal from Tommy Dorsey singer Bonnie Lou Williams, who often dubbed for Virginia Mayo, as Helen, sister of drying-out architect Jagger (Edmond O’Brien), with his new pal Texas cattleman Morgan (Alan Ladd) making a pitch to her railroad-man fiancè (Don Castle) in a Kansas City saloon, villain Brog (Anthony Caruso) watching, song by Leonard Rosenman and Wayne Shanklin, in The Big Land, 1957.
Big Land, The (1957) -- Bathrooms In A House? Taken in by immigrant Johnson (John Qualen) and his widowed daughter-in-law (Julie Bishop) in post-Civil War Kansas, Texas cattle man Morgan (Alan Ladd) and his new drying-out pal Jagger (Edmond O’Brien) learn more about each other and meet ranch hand Ben (James Seay), and the blonde kid is Ladd’s son David, in The Big Land, 1957.
Big Land, The (1957) -- Whiskey Under The Bridge Arrived in Kansas City with notions of pitching a railroad deal, Texan Morgan (Alan Ladd) notices enemy Brog (Anthony Caruso) then wonders what his newly sober pal Jagger (Edmond O’Brien), supposedly making a business contact, is doing with blonde Helen (Virigina Mayo), in The Big Land, 1957.
Big Land, The (1957) -- What Am I, A Trout? Outside a livery stable in post-Civil War Missouri, ripped-off Texas cattleman Morgan (Alan Ladd) rescues troubled Jagger (Edmond O’Brien), who had shown him a kindness, from thugs about to hang him for trying to steal a bottle, and they begin negotiating friendship, in The Big Land, 1957.

Trailer

Bibliography