Ann-margret


Actor, Singer
Ann-margret

About

Also Known As
Ann-Margaret Olsson
Birth Place
Sweden
Born
April 28, 1941

Biography

Dismissed in the 1960s as a mere "sex kitten," Ann-Margret's career outlived her hip-swiveling breakout and over the next four decades proved her tremendous talent and staying power as a singer, dancer and fine dramatic actress. She began her career on the cabaret stage, which she revisited throughout her life as a Las Vegas entertainer and TV variety show host. Her sizzling style was fi...

Photos & Videos

Viva Las Vegas - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Viva Las Vegas - Publicity Stills
Carnal Knowledge - Movie Poster

Family & Companions

Burt Sugarman
Companion
Executive, producer. Prominent Hollywood businessman; briefly engaged in 1962; married TV host Mary Hart in 1989.
Elvis Presley
Companion
Singer, actor. Co-starred with Ann-Margret in "Viva Las Vegas" (1964); romantically involved for a time c. 1964; the two remained friends until Presley's 1977 death.
Roger Smith
Husband
Producer, writer, personal manager, businessman, former actor. Together since 1964; married on May 8, 1967; served as wife's personal manager; starred on TV series, "77 Sunset Strip" (ABC, 1958-63); has three children from a previous marriage; suffers from muscle-debilitating disease myasthenia gravis.

Bibliography

"Ann-Margret: My Story"
Ann-Margret with Todd Gold, G.P. Putnam's Sons (1994)
"Ann-Margret: A Photo Extravaganza and Memoir"
Neal Peters and David Smith, Delilah Books (1981)
"Exercises For the Tired Businessman"
Ann-Margret

Notes

She has an official web site at www.ann-margret.com

Named Female Star of the Year by the United Motion Pictures Association three times

Biography

Dismissed in the 1960s as a mere "sex kitten," Ann-Margret's career outlived her hip-swiveling breakout and over the next four decades proved her tremendous talent and staying power as a singer, dancer and fine dramatic actress. She began her career on the cabaret stage, which she revisited throughout her life as a Las Vegas entertainer and TV variety show host. Her sizzling style was first showcased in the Elvis vehicle "Viva Las Vegas" (1964) as well as "Bye Bye Birdie" (1963), both of which showcased her intriguing beauty, sultry voice and high energy dancing. In the 1970s, she earned respect as a dramatic actress with her Oscar-nominated role in Mike Nichols' "Carnal Knowledge" (1971) and her Golden Globe-winning performance in the rock opera, "Tommy" (1975). The triple-threat's prolific era of made-for-TV movies included a dozen Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominations for movies like "A Streetcar Named Desire" (ABC, 1984) and "Queen" (CBS, 1993). Through comedic performances, Ann-Margret experienced a big screen resurgence the following decade, revisiting her sexy image to play a middle-aged heartbreaker in the two-picture series, "Grumpy Old Men" (1993, 1995), and introducing herself to a new generation with "mother" roles in mainstream comedies like "The Break-up" (2006) and "The Santa Clause 3" (2006). With her old-school foundation as a well-rounded "entertainer" and a screen versatility that allowed her to toss off sassy one-liners or elicit sympathy as a woman in crisis, Ann-Margret was a revered member of Hollywood's old guard.

Born Ann-Margaret Olsson in Stockholm, Sweden on April 28, 1941, the redhead who would one day be known simply as Ann-Margret spent the first five years of her life in her native country before her electrician father was offered a job in stateside. The family settled near Chicago, IL; first in Fox Lake, then in Wilmette where they lived in the funeral home where her mother worked as a receptionist. As a vivacious pre-teen, Ann-Margret began entering talent contests, taking her singing and dancing to national television at age 16 on "The Amateur Hour" (DuMont Network, 1946-49; NBC, 1949-1954; ABC, 1955-57). She joined a number of professional bands while still in school, but in 1960, George Burns discovered the cabaret performer singing and playing the maracas in the lounge of the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. Impressed with her presence, the comedian hired her for $100 per night to perform in his Christmas show at the Sahara Hotel. After landing a recording contract with RCA and releasing the first of many albums in 1961, she made her feature debut as Bette Davis' daughter in Frank Capra's wet-blanket remake, "A Pocketful of Miracles" (1961). The effort earned the actress a Golden Globe Award for Best Newcomer, and though her follow-up, a remake of "State Fair" (1962), bombed, she became the "It girl" of the moment when she sang the Oscar-nominated song "Bachelor in Paradise" at the 34th annual Academy Awards.

With her youthful, high-energy dancing style and breathy vocals, Ann-Margret helped resuscitate the nearly comatose Hollywood musical with her role as the small-town girl chosen to kiss a rock star in "Bye Bye Birdie" (1963). She also played a key role in making "Viva Las Vegas" (1964) Elvis Presley's best musical, matching the King step-for-step in the talent and sex appeal departments. The project also sparked a romance between the pair, who parted as friends and remained close confidantes throughout Elvis' tumultuous life. However "Bye Bye Birdie" and "Viva Las Vegas" were the high points of a flurry of forgettable films cranked out to capitalize on Ann-Margret's sex bomb image. She tackled her first serious role in the uninspired "Kitten with a Whip" (1964), playing a tough, conniving escapee from a reformatory; though some noticed the beginnings of a dramatic actress, most refused to take her seriously. A steady diet of fluff ensued until her 1967 marriage to Roger Smith, the former star of "77 Sunset Strip" (ABC, 1958-1964) who took over her management in partnership with Allan Carr. Smith and Carr groomed Ann-Margret as a variety artist, which begat a decade-long series of highly enjoyable musical-comedy TV specials, beginning with "The Ann-Margret Show" (CBS, 1968). She further survived the death of the Hollywood musical by becoming a staple of the Las Vegas scene where such productions still thrived, selling out shows weeks in advance.

During the 1970s, the cultural icon that had inspired and voiced Ann-Margrock on an episode of "The Flintstones" (ABC, 1960-66) finally won respect as a dramatic actress. Her powerful supporting performance as Jack Nicholson's neglected wife in Mike Nichols' "Carnal Knowledge" (1971) brought, in the words of one critic, "the only sign of humanity" to the picture. She would go on to win a Golden Globe and earn an Oscar nomination for the role. A life-threatening, 22-foot fall from a stage in 1972 temporarily disrupted her career and put the entertainer in a coma for three days, but she made a triumphant Las Vegas comeback an astonishing 10 weeks later. The high-profile accident brought in a staggering 51 million viewers to watch her "comeback" TV variety special, "Ann-Margret: When You're Smiling" (NBC, 1973), the following year. She went on to realize her dream of playing opposite John Wayne by landing role in the relaxed Western "The Train Robbers" (1973), following it up with a surprising and intense performance as deaf, dumb, and blind kid Roger Daltrey's mother in the rock musical "Tommy" (1975), for which she earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. Though Ann-Margret remained busy during the late-1970s, few good roles and films presented themselves, with her acclaimed performance opposite Anthony Hopkins in Richard Attenborough's "Magic" (1978) outnumbered by lame comedies like "Middle Age Crazy" (1980).

Since meaty feature fare was at a minimum for aging actresses, Ann-Margret turned to television during the '80s as an outlet for her dramatic talent. Her TV movie debut, "Who Will Love My Children?" (ABC, 1983), was a stunner that earned her a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television. Encouraged by director John Erman to shed her glamour image to play the part of a cancer-stricken single mother who tries to place her 10 children with new families before she succumbs, Ann-Margret garnered the first of her many forthcoming Emmy nominations. The following year, she offered a Golden Globe-winning interpretation of Blanche DuBois alongside Treat Williams and Beverly D'Angelo in a TV adaptation of "A Streetcar Named Desire" (ABC, 1984). She gave another excellent performance as a complicating member of a trio in the feature film "Twice in a Lifetime" (1985), as "the other woman" who comes between married couple Gene Hackman and Ellen Burstyn. Ann-Margret's TV career continued steadily with the actress bringing some class to the enjoyably trashy Dominick Dunne-adapted miniseries, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles" (NBC, 1987), and holding her own opposite Julie Andrews in the touching AIDS drama "Our Sons" (ABC, 1991). These two TV films plus the follow-up miniseries, "Queen" (CBS, 1993) and the misbegotten "Gone with the Wind" (1939) sequel "Scarlett" (CBS, 1994), were all helmed by Erman, whose partnership with Ann-Margret yielded the actress four Emmy nominations altogether.

As she reached the half-century mark, the multi-faceted entertainer returned to the stage, starring in the biggest production ever staged by a single performer at Radio City Music Hall in 1991. Her profile boost continued with her biggest feature film success in years, as the attractive bone of contention between famous screen team Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in "Grumpy Old Men" (1993). Hot on the heels of that major box office success, she released the bestselling memoir, Ann-Margret: My Story for a reported $1 million publishing deal. She re-teamed with her co-stars for the equally popular sequel "Grumpier Old Men" in 1995. At this time, the actress kicked off a producing career through Ann-Margret Productions, creating vehicles for herself like "Following Her Heart" (NBC, 1994) and "Seduced By Madness: The Diane Borchardt Story" (NBC, 1996). Her first foray into series TV came with her role as the matriarch of a large New Mexican ranching family in "Four Corners" (CBS, 1998), which unfortunately fizzled after only three episodes. An Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated leading role in the Lifetime biopic, "Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story" (1998), about the storied socialite; an almost unrecognizable turn as a wily grandmother in "Happy Face Murders" (Showtime, 1999), and a featured role as a 200-year-old Cinderella in the NBC fantasy miniseries, "The 10th Kingdom" (2000) continued her run as queen of dramatic TV movies.

Returning to feature films to kick off a new era of big screen "mother" roles, Ann-Margret played the estranged mom of a football team owner (Cameron Diaz) in Oliver Stone's "Any Given Sunday" (1999). The following year, she portrayed the wife of nearly washed-up movie mogul Burt Reynolds in "The Last Producer" (2000), also directed by Reynolds. On the small screen she excelled in the "ripped from the headlines" television movie, "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town: JonBenét and the City of Boulder" (2000), and she appeared in the CBS miniseries "Blonde" (2001), based on the Joyce Carol Oates book, as one of the influential women in the life of Marilyn Monr . In "A Woman is a Hell of a Thing" (2001), she was not used to best effect as the New Age-y stepmother of a men's magazine publisher, but that same year, she hit a music milestone when her Gospel album, God is Love: The Gospel Sessions, was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Southern, Bluegrass or Country Gospel category. The tireless worker hit the road in a touring production of "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" before giving a dazzling performance in the telepic, "A Place Called Home" (2004), as an aging, reclusive Southern belle whose feistiness is pitted against a pair of con artists.

In a new century career swing towards light comedy features, Ann-Margret had a supporting role as the mother of Jimmy Fallon's rookie cop in the action-buddy film, "Taxi" (2004), and supported Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn in the romantic comedy hit, "The Break-Up" (2006). She played Santa's mother-in-law in the holiday family offering "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause" (2006), but then the actress went into semi-retirement when she was diagnosed with the neuromuscular disease, myasthenia gravis. Thankfully, she returned to the small screen for an Emmy-winning guest appearance on an episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" (NBC, 1999- ).

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Going in Style (2017)
All's Faire in Love (2011)
Lucky (2011)
The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond (2009)
Old Dogs (2009)
Memory (2007)
The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (2006)
The Break-Up (2006)
Taxi (2004)
Interstate 60 (2003)
The Last Producer (2001)
Any Given Sunday (1999)
Happy Face Murders (1999)
Lorraine Petrovich
Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story (1998)
Blue Rodeo (1996)
Maggie Yearwood
Grumpier Old Men (1995)
Peter Allen: The Boy From Oz (1995)
Herself
Following Her Heart (1994)
Nobody's Children (1994)
Grumpy Old Men (1993)
Ariel Truax
Newsies (1992)
Our Sons (1991)
A New Life (1988)
A Tiger's Tale (1987)
52 Pick-Up (1986)
Twice in a Lifetime (1985)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1984)
Who Will Love My Children? (1983)
I Ought to Be in Pictures (1982)
Stephanie
The Return of the Soldier (1982)
Jenny
Lookin' to Get Out (1982)
Middle Age Crazy (1980)
The Villain (1979)
The Cheap Detective (1978)
Magic (1978)
Joseph Andrews (1977)
Lady Booby
The Last Remake of Beau Geste (1977)
Folies bourgeoises (1976)
Tommy (1975)
The Train Robbers (1973)
The Outside Man (1973)
Nancy
Carnal Knowledge (1971)
Bobbie
C. C. and Company (1970)
Ann McCalley
R. P. M. (1970)
Rhoda
The Tiger and the Pussycat (1967)
Carolina
Made in Paris (1966)
Maggie Scott
Murderers' Row (1966)
Suzie
Stagecoach (1966)
Dallas
The Swinger (1966)
Kelly Olsson
Once a Thief (1965)
Kristine Pedak
Bus Riley's Back in Town (1965)
Laurel
The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
Melba
Viva Las Vegas (1964)
Rusty Martin
The Pleasure Seekers (1964)
Fran Hobson
Kitten With a Whip (1964)
Jody Dvorak
Bye Bye Birdie (1963)
Kim McAfee
State Fair (1962)
Emily Porter
Pocketful of Miracles (1961)
Louise

Music (Feature Film)

Going in Style (2017)
Song Performer
Legion (2010)
Song Performer
The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (2006)
Song Performer
The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (2000)
Song Performer ("Viva Rock Vegas")
Nurse Betty (2000)
Song Performer
Get Bruce (1999)
Song Performer
Blue Rodeo (1996)
Song Performer
Vice Squad (1982)
Song Performer ("Everybody Needs Somebody Sometime")
The Swinger (1966)
Composer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Peter Allen: The Boy From Oz (1995)
Other

Cast (Special)

Bobby Rydell: Wild About Bobby (2001)
Interviewee
Stars Over Mississippi, With Prince Edward (1999)
MDA Jerry Lewis Telethon (1997)
A Conversation with Burt Reynolds (1997)
Guest
Jack Lemmon (1996)
The 1996 ESPY Awards (1996)
Performer
Bob Hope... Laughing With the Presidents (1996)
The Golden Globe's 50th Anniversary Celebration (1994)
The Essence Awards (1993)
Presenter
Tina Turner: Going Home (1993)
Jack Benny: Comedy in Bloom (1992)
1995 Screen Actors Guild Awards (1992)
Presenter
What About Me? I'm Only 3! (1992)
The 63rd Annual Academy Awards Presentation (1991)
Presenter
George Burns' 95th Birthday Party (1991)
America's Dance Honors (1990)
1988 Golden Globe Awards (1989)
Performer
America's Tribute to Bob Hope (1988)
The American Film Institute Salute to Barbara Stanwyck (1987)
Performer
George Burns' 90th Birthday Special (1986)
The Night of 100 Stars II (1985)
Perry Como's Christmas in England (1984)
George Burns Celebrates 80 Years in Show Business (1983)
Hollywood's Private Home Movies (1983)
Guest
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's Women I Love - Beautiful but Funny (1982)
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's 30th Anniversary TV Special (1981)
George Burns' Early, Early, Early, Christmas Show (1981)
The Way They Were (1981)
Ann-Margret's Hollywood Movie Girls (1980)
Las Vegas: Palace of Stars (1979)
Bob Hope Special: Happy Birthday, Bob! (1978)
Ann-Margret... Rhinestone Cowgirl (1977)
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's All-Star Comedy Spectacular From Lake Tahoe (1977)
Perry Como, Las Vegas Style (1976)
Swing Out, Sweet Land (1976)
Ann-Margret Olsson (1975)
Ann-Margret Smith (1975)
Ann-Margret -- When You're Smiling (1973)
The Ann-Margret Show (1968)
Host

Music (Special)

Taxicab Confessions: New York, New York (2003)
Song Performer
Stars Over Mississippi, With Prince Edward (1999)
Song Performer

Cast (Short)

From Paris - Your Reporter Richard Crenna (1966)
Herself

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

A Place Called Home (2003)
Blonde (2001)
Perfect Murder, Perfect Town (2000)
The 10th Kingdom (2000)
Seduced by Madness: The Diane Borchardt Story (1996)
Scarlett (1994)
Queen (1993)
The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987)

Life Events

1954

At age 13, won a dancing and singing talent contest on a local TV station

1957

Appeared on "Ted Mack's Amateur Hour" (ABC), winning prize as first runner-up

1958

Made professional performing debut singing with Danny Ferguson's band for one summer month at the Muehlebach Hotel in Kansas City

1959

Formed jazz combo the Suttletones with three male classmates at Northwestern University

1960

Was noticed by George Burns while singing and playing the maracas in the lounge of the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas; hired for $100 per night for ten nights to perform in his Christmas show at the Congo Room of the Sahara Hotel

1961

Released first album "And Here She Is--Ann-Margret"

1961

Made film acting debut as Bette Davis' daughter in Frank Capra's "A Pocketful of Miracles"

1961

Made first major TV appearance on the "Jack Benny Show," which led to a contract with 20th Century-Fox and her first movie

1961

Signed recording contract with RCA

1962

Played sweet-but-seductive bombshell-next-door in third-rate film remake of the musical "State Fair"

1962

Performed the Oscar-nominated song "Bachelor in Paradise" at the Academy Awards ceremony; received write-up in <i>Show Magazine</i> that said: "In the space of three minutes, Ann-Margret became the hottest name in town"

1963

Sang at President John F Kennedy's 46th birthday party, just as Marilyn Monroe had the year before

1963

Co-starred as Kim McAfee in the film adaptation of the Broadway hit "Bye Bye Birdie"; sang on the popular soundtrack album

1964

Made motion picture exhibitors poll of top ten boxoffice stars, placing eighth; acted opposite Elvis Presley in "Viva Las Vegas"; also starred in "Kitten with a Whip" and "The Pleasure Seekers"

1964

Performed at President Lyndon B Johnson's inaugural gala

1968

Hosted first TV special, "The Ann-Margret Show" (CBS)

1970

Elicited some favorable reviews for her turn in Stanley Kramer misfire, "R.P.M"

1971

Received increased critical respect and a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her role in "Carnal Knowledge", directed by Mike Nichols

1973

Starred in TV musical variety special, "Ann-Margret ... When You're Smiling" (NBC), an edited version of her Las Vegas stage act; was her most popular TV special, drawing over 51 million viewers

1973

Acted opposite John Wayne in "The Train Robbers"

1975

Earned Oscar nomination as Best Actress for her turn as Nora Walker Hobbs in "Tommy", Ken Russell's film version of the Who's rock opera

1977

Headlined as Lady Booby in Tony Richardson's "Joseph Andrews", the director's failed attempt to recapture the glory of his "Tom Jones" (1963)

1978

Gave another well-received performance alongside Anthony Hopkins in "Magic", directed by Richard Attenborough

1979

Acted with Kirk Douglas and Arnold Schwarzeneggar in Hal Needham's "The Villain"

1980

Starred in last TV variety special "Ann-Margret's Hollywood Movie Girls" (ABC)

1981

Made first film with Walter Matthau, "I Ought to Be in Pictures"

1982

Portrayed Alan Bates' doting cousin in "The Return of the Soldier"

1983

Made TV drama debut on "Who Will Love My Children?", for which she earned an Emmy nomination

1984

Scored a triumph as Blanche DuBois in the ABC-TV remake of "A Streetcar Named Desire", earning a second Emmy nomination

1985

Played home-wrecking other woman in "Twice in a Lifetime", co-starring Gene Hackman and Ellen Burstyn

1986

Turned in fine performance as Roy Scheider's wife in John Frankenheimer's "52 Pick-Up"

1987

Earned another Emmy nomination for her miniseries debut, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles" (NBC), helmed by Erman; starred opposite Claudette Colbert who was returning to the screen after a 25-year absence

1991

Made NYC debut at Radio City Music Hall

1992

Played showgirl Medda on Disney's "Newsies" film adaptation

1993

Picked up fourth Emmy nomination for the miniseries "Queen" (CBS), helmed by Erman; played a woman who aged from 35 to 85, ending up with a dowager's hump, bad teeth and failing eyesight (contact lenses gave the appearance of cataracts)

1993

Co-starred with Jack Lemmon and Matthau in the hit comedy "Grumpy Old Men"

1994

Portrayed madam Belle Watling in CBS miniseries "Scarlett", adapted from Alexandra Ripley's "sequel" to "Gone With the Wind"; sixth collaboration with Erman; network censors cut one of her scenes for US version

1994

Produced (through Ann-Margret Productions) and starred in "Following Her Heart" (NBC), directed by Lee Grant; first time singing in a TV-movie; her mother helped her rehearse her role as a Swedish immigrant, guaranteeing an authentic accent

1995

Reprised her role in the sequel "Grumpier Old Men"

1996

Played a popular teacher who uses her wiles to convince three students into killing her husband in the fact-based NBC miniseries "Seduced By Madness: The Diane Borchardt Story"; produced through Ann-Margret Productions

1998

TV series debut as regular, starring in the short-lived CBS midseason replacement "Four Corners"; show cancelled after three episodes aired; produced through Ann-Margret Productions

1998

Won plaudits (and a fifth Emmy nod) for her impersonation of Pamela Harriman in the Lifetime biographical movie "Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story"

1999

Portrayed the estranged mother of a football team owner (Cameron Diaz) in Oliver Stone's "Any Given Sunday"

1999

Was almost unrecognizable as a wily grandmother who frames her abusive younger boyfriend in "Happy Face Murders" (Showtime), first collaboration with actress Marg Helgenberger

2000

Acted in Burt Reynolds' "The Last Producer" (shot in 1999), screened at Cannes; aired on USA Network in 2001

2000

Reteamed with Helgenberger (as Patsy Ramsey) for CBS miniseries "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town", a look at the murder of JonBenet Ramsey

2000

Essayed the role of a 200-year-old Cinderella (who looks 55) in NBC fantasy miniseries "The 10th Kingdom"

2001

Starred as Miss Mona in a national tour of "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas"; debut as a musical theater performer; briefly withdrew from performances in late February to care for her ill mother

2001

Co-starred in "A Woman's a Helluva Thing"

2006

Cast as Santa's mother-in-law in "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause"

2006

Joined with Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston in the comedy "The Break-Up"

2007

Co-starred with Billy Zane in the psychological thriller, "Memory"

2009

Appeared with Robin Williams and John Travolta in the comedy "Old Dogs"

2010

Guest-starred on NBC's "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit"

2014

Returned to the screen for her first role in three years on a pair of episodes of "Ray Donovan"

2017

Played Annie in "Going in Style"

Photo Collections

Viva Las Vegas - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Viva Las Vegas (1964), starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret.
Viva Las Vegas - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from Viva Las Vegas (1964), starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Carnal Knowledge - Movie Poster
Carnal Knowledge - Movie Poster
The Cincinnati Kid - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills of Ann-Margret and Tuesday Weld taken to publicize The Cincinnati Kid (1965). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Cincinnati Kid - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are some stills taken behind-the-scenes during production of The Cincinnati Kid (1965), starring Steve McQueen, Ann-Margret, Tuesday Weld, and Edward G. Robinson, and directed by Norman Jewison.
Kitten with a Whip - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from Universal Pictures' Kitten with a Whip (1964), starring Ann-Margret and John Forsythe. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Viva Las Vegas - Movie Posters
Here are some original-release movie posters from MGM's Viva Las Vegas (1964), starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret.
Viva Las Vegas - Scene Stills
Here are a number of scene stills from MGM's Viva Las Vegas (1964), starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret.

Videos

Movie Clip

Viva Las Vegas (1964) - Come On Everybody! Lucky (Elvis Presley) is persuaded to perform Stanley Chianese's "Come On Everybody" for the kids, ably assisted by Rusty (Ann-Margret) in Viva Las Vegas, 1964.
Once A Thief (1965) - Can I Sit In The Rumble Seat? First scene in which we can identify Alain Delon as Eddie, pretty-well confirming he committed a holdup and murder, followed by the cops, collecting his daughter (Tammy Locke) and wife Ann-Margret, who relates a memory that sure seems to refer to her own Swedish father, early in Once A Thief, 1965.
Once A Thief (1965) - I Don't Need You San Francisco ex-con Eddie (Alain Delon), who we know is committing armed robberies on his own, nonetheless pushes back when his gangster brother Walter (Jack Palance), with his hoodlum sidekick (John Davis Chandler), offers him a job, pleasing Eddie’s wife (Ann-Margret), in Once A Thief, 1965.
Carnal Knowledge (1971) - You Have A Long Life Line... The first appearance of Bobbie (Ann-Margret) features her on a date with accountant Jonathan (Jack Nicholson), first in a dimly-lit restaurant, with a deliberate artificial technique by director Mike Nichols and cinematographer Giuseppe Rotunno, then in a Manhattan taxi, in Carnal Knowledge, 1971.
Viva Las Vegas (1964) - Only Way to Travel! Local gal Rusty (Ann-Margret) and race driver Lucky (Elvis Presley), who turns out to also be helicopter pilot, take a vigorous recreational tour between musical numbers in Viva Las Vegas, 1964.
Viva Las Vegas (1964) - What'd I Say? A quick sample of "The Climb" by "The Forte` Four" leads into Lucky (Elvis Presley) and Rusty (Ann-Margret) leading their rousing version of Ray Charles' "What'd I Say?" in Viva Las Vegas, 1964.
Tommy (1975) - A Film By Ken Russell Diretor Ken Russell’s prologue, one of the least remarked-upon scenes, shot partly in Borrowdale Valley, England’s far northwest Lake District, seen in other Russell films, with Robert Powell as doomed Captain Walker and Ann-Margret his wife, before the birth of the hero, in the famous adaptation of the rock opera by Pete Townshend and The Who, Tommy, 1975.
Tommy (1975) - Amazing Journey In a song substantially expanded by composer Pete Townshend from the original 1969 recording by The Who, leading man Roger Daltrey’s vocal describes the now-traumatized hero (Barry Winch), with his mother (Ann-Margret) and Oliver Reed as her lover Frank, now a murderer, in director Ken Russell’s Tommy, 1975.
Murderers' Row (1966) - Open, Dream Has Come True With a neat shift from Lalo Schifrin music grooviness to evil-apocalyptic spy spoof, the opening of the 1966 "Matt Helm" feature Murderers' Row, starring Dean Martin, Ann-Margret and Karl Malden.
Murderers' Row (1966) - Not The Marrying Kind Spy Matt Helm, casing an apartment, doesn't notice some guy named Dean Martin singing "Not The Marrying Kind," (by Lalo Schifrin and Howard Greenfield) as Coco (Camilla Sparv), Wall (Karl Malden) and Suzie (Ann-Margret) are introduced, in Murderers' Row, 1966.
Tommy (1975) - Bernie's Holiday Camp In a new song composed by Pete Townshend for the Ken Russell film, Oliver Reed introduced as Frank, Barry Winch as the young hero and Ann-Margret his mother, shot near Portsmouth and inside the South Parade Pier ballroom, in Robert Stigwood’s production of the rock opera by The Who, Tommy, 1975.
Tommy (1975) - Christmas Another song modified by Pete Townshend for narrative reasons from the original recording by The Who, Ann-Margret as mother Nora, Oliver Reed as her lover Frank, vocals by the principals though the voice of the hero (Barry Winch) is not credited, in Ken Russell’s film from the rock opera, Tommy, 1975.

Trailer

Promo

Family

Gustav Olsson
Father
Electrician. Had worked for a time in the USA during his youth; emigrated back to the USA in 1942 shortly after Ann-Margret's birth when he got a job with the Johnson Electrical Company; mother, initially reluctant to leave Sweden, and Ann-Margret followed in 1946.
Anna Olsson
Mother
Funeral parlor receptionist. Mother went to work after father became too ill to continue with his job at the electric company.
Jordan Smith
Step-Son
Tracey Smith
Step-Daughter
Dallas Thomas Smith
Step-Daughter

Companions

Burt Sugarman
Companion
Executive, producer. Prominent Hollywood businessman; briefly engaged in 1962; married TV host Mary Hart in 1989.
Elvis Presley
Companion
Singer, actor. Co-starred with Ann-Margret in "Viva Las Vegas" (1964); romantically involved for a time c. 1964; the two remained friends until Presley's 1977 death.
Roger Smith
Husband
Producer, writer, personal manager, businessman, former actor. Together since 1964; married on May 8, 1967; served as wife's personal manager; starred on TV series, "77 Sunset Strip" (ABC, 1958-63); has three children from a previous marriage; suffers from muscle-debilitating disease myasthenia gravis.

Bibliography

"Ann-Margret: My Story"
Ann-Margret with Todd Gold, G.P. Putnam's Sons (1994)
"Ann-Margret: A Photo Extravaganza and Memoir"
Neal Peters and David Smith, Delilah Books (1981)
"Exercises For the Tired Businessman"
Ann-Margret

Notes

She has an official web site at www.ann-margret.com

Named Female Star of the Year by the United Motion Pictures Association three times

Received PHOTOPLAY Magazine's Gold Medal Award as Most Popular Actress in both 1971 and 1972

Awarded a citation for outstanding performances for her tours of Vietnam and the Far East, presented by former President Lyndon B Johnson

"When I die, I want Ann-Margret to dance on my coffin. If you don't see me in five minutes, you'll know I'm dead for sure." --John Wayne

"What I'm happy about is there's no bitterness in me. About anything. How can I be bitter when my life is so good." --Ann-Margret quoted in USA Today, February 9, 1994.

About the dichotomy of her sexy image and her spiritual beliefs, Ann-Margaret told the Los Angeles Times (February 5, 2002): I know it sounds really strange. But [the religious side] is a part of me that I have not had a chance to show. I've always believed in the Lord, and I really felt good being able to express myself that way."