Stanley Cortez


Director Of Photography

About

Also Known As
Stanislaus Krantz, Stanislaus Kranze
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
November 04, 1905
Died
December 23, 1997
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

A master of chiaroscuro cinematography, Stanley Cortez once described himself as "always chosen to shoot weird things." Born Stanislaus Krantz in NYC, he adopted his stage name from his older brother, actor-director Ricardo Cortez (1899-1977). While still an undergraduate, Cortez began working as an assistant cameraman on silent films. At the advent of talking pictures, he worked as a ph...

Biography

A master of chiaroscuro cinematography, Stanley Cortez once described himself as "always chosen to shoot weird things." Born Stanislaus Krantz in NYC, he adopted his stage name from his older brother, actor-director Ricardo Cortez (1899-1977). While still an undergraduate, Cortez began working as an assistant cameraman on silent films. At the advent of talking pictures, he worked as a photographer's assistant to Edward Steichen and Pirie MacDonald and briefly pursued a career as a portrait photographer in his own right. He wrote, directed and shot the short "Scherzo" (1932) before landing as a contract cinematographer at Universal in the late 1930s. Many of the early features he shot were undistinguished (an exception was 1934's minor horror classic "The Black Cat"), but Cortez developed a reputation for economy and efficiency. He was loaned to RKO to shoot Orson Welles' "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942). Sparing no expense, he and Welles created a particular look for the film drawn from the low-key lighting utilized by early photographic pioneers. Cortez's fluid camerawork with its deep-focus and unique framing kept the film visually interesting and he earned his first Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography. His second Academy Award nomination was for his work alongside Lee Garmes on the epic "Since You Went Away" (1944).

Cortez utilized color for the first time on the superb thriller "The Man on the Eiffel Tower" (1949) which captured the beauty of its Paris setting as well as enhanced the story's inherent mysteries. That film's leading man, Charles Laughton, was impressed enough to hire the cinematographer for "The Night of the Hunter" (1955). Laughton as director created a stylized look for the film that borrowed from German expressionism to American silents. Although the film was a box-office flop in its day, it has since achieved a richly deserved reputation as a classic, with Cortez's photography a major factor in setting the thriller's mood. He also shot "The Three Faces of Eve" (1957) and his camerawork was instrumental in establishing each of the heroine's personalities. For the remainder of his career, however, the director of photography was often employed on low-budget productions that were of varying quality, although he was allowed room for visual experimentation.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

D.W. Griffith: Father of Film (1993)

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Let There Be Light (1980)
Director of Photography
Another Man, Another Chance (1977)
Director Of Photography
The Date (1971)
Director Of Photography
Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970)
Titl seq Photographer
The Bridge at Remagen (1969)
Director of Photography
Blue (1968)
Director of Photography
The Navy vs. the Night Monsters (1966)
Director of Photography
The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966)
Director of Photography
Young Dillinger (1965)
Director of Photography
Nightmare in the Sun (1964)
Director of Photography
The Candidate (1964)
Director of Photography
The Naked Kiss (1964)
Director of Photography
They Saved Hitler's Brain (1964)
Director Of Photography
The Madmen of Mandoras (1963)
Camera
Shock Corridor (1963)
Director of Photography
Back Street (1961)
Director of Photography
Dinosaurus! (1960)
Director of Photography
The Angry Red Planet (1960)
Director of Photography
Vice Raid (1960)
Director of Photography
Thunder in the Sun (1959)
Director of Photography
South Pacific (1958)
Camera
The Three Faces of Eve (1957)
Director of Photography
Top Secret Affair (1957)
Director of Photography
Man from Del Rio (1956)
Photography
Black Tuesday (1955)
Director of Photography
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
Photography
Riders to the Stars (1954)
Director of Photography
Apache (1954)
Photography
Dragon's Gold (1953)
Director of Photography
Yesterday and Today (1953)
Photography
The Diamond Queen (1953)
Director of Photography
Shark River (1953)
Director of Photography
The Neanderthal Man (1953)
Director of Photography
Stronghold (1952)
Director of Photography
Models Inc. (1952)
Director of Photography
Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd (1952)
Director of Photography
Fort Defiance (1951)
Director of Photography
The Basketball Fix (1951)
Director of Photography
The Admiral Was a Lady (1950)
Photography
The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1950)
Director of Photography
The Underworld Story (1950)
Director of Photography
Secret Beyond the Door (1948)
Director of Photography
Smart Woman (1948)
Director of Photography
Smash Up--The Story of a Woman (1947)
Director of Photography
Let There Be Light (1946)
Cinematographer
Since You Went Away (1944)
Photography
The Powers Girl (1943)
Director of Photography
Flesh and Fantasy (1943)
Director of Photography
The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)
Photography
Eagle Squadron (1942)
Director of Photography
Sealed Lips (1942)
Director of Photography
Bombay Clipper (1942)
Director of Photography
Moonlight in Hawaii (1941)
Director of Photography
Badlands of Dakota (1941)
Director of Photography
San Antonio Rose (1941)
Director of Photography
The Black Cat (1941)
Director of Photography
A Dangerous Game (1941)
Director of Photography
Margie (1940)
Director of Photography
Alias the Deacon (1940)
Director of Photography
It's a Date (1940)
Background Photographer
The Leatherpushers (1940)
Director of Photography
Love, Honor, and Oh-Baby! (1940)
Director of Photography
Meet the Wildcat (1940)
Director of Photography
For Love or Money (1939)
Photography
They Asked for It (1939)
Director of Photography
Laugh It Off (1939)
Director of Photography
Risky Business (1939)
Director of Photography
The Forgotten Woman (1939)
Director of Photography
Hawaiian Nights (1939)
Director of Photography
Exposed (1938)
Director of Photography
The Last Express (1938)
Director of Photography
Personal Secretary (1938)
Director of Photography
The Lady in the Morgue (1938)
Cinematographer
The Black Doll (1938)
Photography
Danger on the Air (1938)
Director of Photography
Four Days' Wonder (1937)
Photography
The Wildcatter (1937)
Photography
I Cover the War (1937)
Camera
Armored Car (1937)
Photography
A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935)
Camera Operator
Shanghai Madness (1933)
Camera Operator
My Lips Betray (1933)
Camera Operator
Lady with a Past (1932)
2nd Camera
Panama Flo (1932)
2nd Camera
Devotion (1931)
Assistant Camera

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

When Time Ran Out (1980)
Photography
Damien - Omen II (1978)
Photography

Life Events

1926

First film as assistant cameraman

1932

Short film directing debut (also writer; cinematographer), "Scherzo"

1936

First feature as director of photography, "Four Day's Wonder"

1941

Loaned to RKO for Orson Welles' "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942), garnered first Academy Award nomination

1942

Returned to Universal

1942

Served as photographer in US Signal Corps during WWII

1944

Earned second Oscar nomination for "Since You Went Away"

1949

First work in Technicolor "The Man on the Eiffel Tower"

1955

Selected by Charles Laughton to shoot "Night of the Hunter"

1957

Was director of photography for "The Three Faces of Eve"

1971

Shot the ABC comedy thriller "Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate"

1977

Last feature as director of photography, Claude Lelouch's "Another Man, Another Chance"

1980

Final feature credit, miniature photography for "When Time Ran Out"

Videos

Movie Clip

Since You Went Away (1944) - The Eternal Also-Ran Anne (Claudette Colbert) meets divorcee Emily (Agnes Moorehead) for a drink, social commentary overheard, and Tony (Joseph Cotten) appearing, in David Selznick's home-front saga Since You Went Away, 1944.
Since You Went Away (1944) - I Wish I Were Twenty-Seven Jane (Jennifer Jones) is at first compassionate toward Corporal Smollett (Jones' then-husband Robert Walker) then swooning before officer Tony (Joseph Cotten) in David Selznick's Since You Went Away, 1944.
Three Faces Of Eve, The (1957) - Opening, Introduction Opening credits and the most dignified introduction by Alistair Cooke from Nunnally Johnson's The Three Faces of Eve, starring Academy Award-winner Joanne Woodward, Lee J. Cobb and David Wayne.
Three Faces Of Eve, The (1957) - On Your Way To Hollywood Georgian Ralph White (David Wayne) discovers some gaudy wardrobe purchases and confronts his wife (Joanne Woodward, title character), early in Nunnally Johnson's The Three Faces of Eve, 1957.
Shock Corridor (1963) - Formal Complaint Aiming to go under-cover in the mental hospital, reporter Johnny (Peter Breck), with girlfriend Cathy (Constance Towers) posing as his sister, works to trick Dr. Menkin (Paul Dubov) into committing him, in writer-director (and ex-newsman) Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor, 1963.
Shock Corridor (1963) - Nathan Bedford Forrest Now a patient in the mental hospital, on-assignment reporter Johnny (Peter Breck), lookng to solve a murder case, approaches delusional witness Stuart (James Best), then sees Pagliacci (Larry Tucker) et al cause a scene, in writer-director Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor, 1963.
Shock Corridor (1963) - Riding The Crazy Horse Opening scene from writer-director Sam Fuller, Johnny (Peter Breck) interrogated by Dr. Fong (Philip Ahn), with Swanee (William Zuckert) and Cathy (Constance Towers), plotting high-risk investigative reporting, in Shock Corridor, 1963.
Shock Corridor (1963) - America For Americans! Famous and profane scene, under-cover reporter Johnny (Peter Breck) with Trent (Hari Rhodes) during daily antics on the psych ward, who goes on a tirade, the key part of which writer-producer-director Samuel Fuller said he copied from a speech on the floor of the U.S. Congress, in Shock Corridor, 1963.
Three Faces Of Eve, The (1957) - You're Not Gonna Be Subdivided Dr. Luther (Lee J. Cobb) tries to explain the state of things to Eve (Joanne Woodward) who's in her "Eve Black" personality at the hospital in The Three Faces of Eve, 1957.
Three Faces Of Eve, The (1957) - Under The House SPOILER in a way, Dr. Luther (Lee J. Cobb), in a dramatic session, asks Eve (Joanne Woodward), who's in her "Jane" phase, what happened "under the house," in this famous scene near the end of Nunnally Johnson's The Three Faces of Eve, 1957.
Three Faces Of Eve, The (1957) - I'm Getting Stronger Dr. Luther (Lee J. Cobb) brings in Dr. Day (Edwin Jerome) to get his opinion on whether Georgia housewife Eve White (Joanne Woodward) is faking her "Eve Black" personality in the fact-based The Three Faces of Eve, 1957.
Magnificent Ambersons, The (1942) - The Magnificence Joseph Cotten (as "Eugene") is featured in the unaccustomed role of a fashion model, supporting the director's famous narration at the opening of Orson Welles' The Magnificent Ambersons, 1942, from the Booth Tarkington novel.

Trailer

Family

Ricardo Cortez
Brother
Actor. Born 1899; died 1977.

Bibliography