Merian C. Cooper


Producer
Merian C. Cooper

About

Also Known As
Merian Caldwell Cooper, Merian Cooper
Birth Place
Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Born
October 24, 1894
Died
April 21, 1973

Biography

Director, with Ernest Schoedsack, of exotic adventure films in the 1920s and 30s, most notably "King Kong" (1933). Cooper subsequently concentrated on producing, often in collaboration with John Ford, and received a Special Academy Award in 1952 for his "many innovations and contributions to the art of motion pictures."...

Family & Companions

Dorothy Jordan
Wife
Actor.

Biography

Director, with Ernest Schoedsack, of exotic adventure films in the 1920s and 30s, most notably "King Kong" (1933). Cooper subsequently concentrated on producing, often in collaboration with John Ford, and received a Special Academy Award in 1952 for his "many innovations and contributions to the art of motion pictures."

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

King Kong (1933)
Director
The Four Feathers (1929)
Director
Gow the Headhunter (1928)
Director
Chang (1927)
Director
Grass; A Nation's Battle for Life (1925)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Grass; A Nation's Battle for Life (1925)

Cinematography (Feature Film)

The Four Feathers (1929)
Director of Photography
Gow, the Head Hunter (1928)
Director of Photography
Grass; A Nation's Battle for Life (1925)
Director of Photography

Writer (Feature Film)

King Kong (2005)
Based on a Story by
Mighty Joe Young (1998)
From Story
The Mighty Kong (1998)
From Story
Mighty Joe Young (1998)
Story By
King Kong Lives (1986)
Characters As Source Material
Mighty Joe Young (1949)
Original Story
King Kong (1933)
Idea conceived by
The Lost Empire (1924)
Titles

Producer (Feature Film)

The Best of Cinerama (1963)
Producer
The Missouri Traveler (1958)
Executive Producer
The Searchers (1956)
Executive Producer
The Quiet Man (1952)
Producer
This Is Cinerama (1952)
Producer
This Is Cinerama (1952)
Presented By
Wagon Master (1950)
Presented By
Rio Grande (1950)
Producer
Mighty Joe Young (1949)
Presented By
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Presented By
3 Godfathers (1949)
Presented By
Fort Apache (1948)
Presented By
The Fugitive (1947)
Presented By
The Toy Wife (1938)
Producer
Dancing Pirate (1936)
Executive Producer
This Man Is Mine (1934)
Executive Producer
Finishing School (1934)
Executive Producer
Man of Two Worlds (1934)
Executive Producer
Sing and Like It (1934)
Executive Producer
Keep 'Em Rolling (1934)
Executive Producer
The Meanest Gal in Town (1934)
Executive Producer
Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934)
Executive Producer
Spitfire (1934)
Executive Producer
Two Alone (1934)
Executive Producer
Long Lost Father (1934)
Executive Producer
Crime Doctor (1934)
Executive Producer
Success at Any Price (1934)
Executive Producer
The Lost Patrol (1934)
Executive Producer
Diplomaniacs (1933)
Executive Producer
Emergency Call (1933)
Executive Producer
Lucky Devils (1933)
Associate Producer
Headline Shooter (1933)
Executive Producer
After Tonight (1933)
Executive Producer
Morning Glory (1933)
Executive Producer
Before Dawn (1933)
Executive Producer
Flaming Gold (1933)
Executive Producer
The Son of Kong (1933)
Executive Producer
Ann Vickers (1933)
Executive Producer
Midshipman Jack (1933)
Executive Producer
Flying Down to Rio (1933)
Executive Producer
The Silver Cord (1933)
Executive Producer
Cross Fire (1933)
Executive Producer
No Marriage Ties (1933)
Executive Producer
Little Women (1933)
Executive Producer
Professional Sweetheart (1933)
Executive Producer
The Right to Romance (1933)
Executive Producer
If I Were Free (1933)
Executive Producer
One Man's Journey (1933)
Executive Producer
Melody Cruise (1933)
Executive Producer
Blind Adventure (1933)
Executive Producer
Flying Devils (1933)
Executive Producer
Aggie Appleby, Maker of Men (1933)
Executive Producer
Ace of Aces (1933)
Executive Producer
Bed of Roses (1933)
Executive Producer
Double Harness (1933)
Executive Producer
Chance at Heaven (1933)
Executive Producer
The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
Associate Producer
The Phantom of Crestwood (1932)
Associate Producer
Gow the Headhunter (1928)
Producer
Chang (1927)
Producer
Grass; A Nation's Battle for Life (1925)
Producer

Editing (Feature Film)

The Lost Empire (1924)
Film Editor

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Gow the Headhunter (1928)
Photography

Production Companies (Feature Film)

The Sun Shines Bright (1953)
Company
The Quiet Man (1952)
Company
She (1935)
Company
The Last Days of Pompeii (1935)
Company
Stingaree (1934)
Company
King Kong (1933)
Company
The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

King Kong (1976)
Other

Life Events

1919

Left Air Force; joined Polish Army to fight Reds

1920

Member of Kosciusko's Squadron; shot down and reported dead

1930

Dirctor of Pan American Airways

1931

Joined RKO

1933

Made vice president in charge of production at RKO Pictures

1933

Co-founded Pioneer Pictures with Jock and C.V. Whitney

1935

Became executive director of Pioneer

1936

Merged Pioneer with Selznick-International; made vice president of Selznick-International Pictures

1937

Formed Argosy Pictures with John Ford; first Argosy film, "The Long Voyage Home" (1940)

Photo Collections

King Kong - Merian C. Cooper Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills taken of Merian C. Cooper, the producer and co-director of RKO's King Kong (1933).

Videos

Movie Clip

Searchers, The (1956) - Let's Go Home Significant SPOILER here in a landmark picture, Natalie Wood as the mature Debbie is rescued from five years captivity by her adoptive brother Marty (Jeffrey Hunter) from the Comanche chief Scar (Henry Brandon), as his partner Ethan (John Wayne), leading an attack with Rev. Clayton (Ward Bond), appears determined to execute her, in John Ford’s The Searchers, 1956.
Searchers, The (1956) - We've Seen Scalps Before Big reveal here as Mexican trader Figueroa (Antonio Moreno) leads the title characters (John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter as Ethan and Martin) to meet Comanche chief Scar (Henry Brandon), who is suspected of holding kidnapped Debbie (who’s grown up to be Natalie Wood), and who brandishes a medal long ago given to the girl, in John Ford’s celebrated Western The Searchers, 1956.
Silver Cord, The (1933) - Have You Had Many Frances Dee as Hester and Eric Linden as younger-brother and fiancè Robert have stepped forward in the family drama, she having nearly offended his well-heeled mother, causing a more forthright discussion than she expected, in director John Cromwell’s The Silver Cord, 1933, from Jane Murfin’s script based on Sidney Howard’s hit play.
Last Days Of Pompeii, The - Greatest Man In Judea Once virtuous blacksmith turned gladiator turned horse and slave trader Marcus (Preston Foster), still devoted to his adopted son (David Holt), pursuing a prophesy that the greatest man in Judea would come to their aid, visits Pontius Pilate (Basil Rathbone, just introduced, in an atypical hairdo), in The Last Days Of Pompeii, 1935.
Last Days Of Pompeii, The (1935) - In Caesar's Name! SPOILER except the title suggests Vesuvius will erupt, more special effects are deployed as Marcus (Preston Foster) chooses his wounded Christian son (John Wood) over his Roman prefect master (Louis Calhern) and his troops, in the disaster epic from RKO’s King Kong team (Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack), The Last Days Of Pompeii, 1935.
Last Days Of Pompeii, The (1935) - The Physical Setting Of This Picture Make no mistake about your epic scale, as producer Merian C. Cooper and director Ernest B. Schoedsack (of King Kong fame, two years earlier) bank their hefty set and special effects costs, with an unusual prologue attributing the story, and we meet Lucius and Gaius (Marc Loebell, Frank Conroy), opening The Last Days Of Pompeii, 1935.
Last Days Of Pompeii, The (1935) - Just About What The Job Is Worth We’ve established the city of Pompeii, in what must be the early years Anno Domini, when gladiator wrangler Cleon (William V. Mong) needs an assist from top-billed Preston Foster (introduced here as blacksmith Marcus), Gloria Shea his wife, and Frank Conroy as interested nobleman Gaius, early in RKO’s The Last Days Of Pompeii, 1935.
3 Godfathers (1948) - Opening, Dedication Opening sequence to John Ford's 3 Godfathers, 1949, starring John Wayne, Pedro Armendariz and Harry Carey Jr., with a famous dedication to Ford's friend Harry Carey.
3 Godfathers (1948) - By The Way Of New Jerusalem We’ve just met Hightower, Fuerte and Kearny (John Wayne, Pedro Armendariz, Harry Carey Jr.) and heard of their plan to rob the bank in an Arizona town, and they ride in for a funny (if grossly sexist) visit with Ward Bond and Mae Marsh as the Sweets, early in John Ford’s sentimental re-make, 3 Godfathers, 1948.
Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934) - Keep Romance Alive Some parody and invention in the opening from director Mark Sandrich (and writers Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby and Edward Kaufman), plus RKO ingenues, but mostly a quick route to singing star Ruth Etting, with a tune also by Kalmar and Ruby, opening the Bert Wheeler-Robert Woolsey comedy team vehicle Hips, Hips, Hooray!, 1934.
Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934) - You Can Eat The Lipstick Fetching window model Daisy (Dorothy Lee) is getting no traction with cosmetic sales, with some neat shooting by director Mark Sandrich, when we meet stars Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey (“Dr. Dudley” and sidekick) stealing her audience, early in RKO’s Hips, Hips, Hooray!, 1934.
Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934) - Meet That Man And Merge Shady lipstick salesmen Dr. Dudley and Andy (the RKO comedy team, Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey) have hijacked an office hoping they, with ally Daisy (Dorothy Lee), can trick her better-financed boss (Thelma Todd as Miss Frisby) into a merger, in Hips, Hips, Hooray!, 1934.

Trailer

Companions

Dorothy Jordan
Wife
Actor.

Bibliography