Lester Cole


Screenwriter

About

Also Known As
Lewis Copley, Gerard L C Copley, Gerald L. C. Copley, J. Redmond Prior
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
June 19, 1904
Died
August 15, 1985
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

One of the original ten blacklisted by Hollywood, Cole began his writing career in 1932 with "If I Had a Million." His autobiography was aptly titled "Hollywood Red."...

Bibliography

"Hollywood Red"
Lester Cole

Notes

In 1997, the Writers Guild of America restored credit to several blacklisted writers, including Cole. Among the films that had the credits changed were "Born Free" (1966) which Cole scripted under the pseudonym Gerald L C Copley.

Biography

One of the original ten blacklisted by Hollywood, Cole began his writing career in 1932 with "If I Had a Million." His autobiography was aptly titled "Hollywood Red."

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The House of the Seven Gables (1940)
Dialogue Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Hollywood On Trial (1976)
Himself
South of Dixie (1944)
Love at First Sight (1930)
Paul Russell
Painted Faces (1929)
Roderick

Writer (Feature Film)

Born Free (1966)
Writ for the screen by
Chain Lightning (1950)
Suggested by a story by
High Wall (1948)
Screenwriter
The Romance of Rosy Ridge (1947)
Screenwriter
Fiesta (1947)
Original Screenplay
Strange Conquest (1946)
Based on a Story by
Blood on the Sun (1945)
Screenwriter
Men in Her Diary (1945)
Adaptation
Objective, Burma! (1945)
Screenwriter
None Shall Escape (1944)
Screenwriter
Hostages (1943)
Screenwriter
Night Plane from Chungking (1943)
Screenwriter
The Good Fellows (1943)
Contract Writer
Pacific Blackout (1942)
Screenwriter
Among the Living (1941)
Screenwriter
Footsteps in the Dark (1941)
Screenwriter
Pacific Blackout (1941)
Screenwriter
Among the Living (1941)
Story
Bad Men of Missouri (1941)
Contract Writer
The House of the Seven Gables (1940)
Screenwriter
The Invisible Man Returns (1940)
Screenwriter
When the Daltons Rode (1940)
Screenwriter
The Big Guy (1939)
Screenwriter
Winter Carnival (1939)
Screenwriter
I Stole a Million (1939)
Original Story
Sinners in Paradise (1938)
Screenwriter
The Jury's Secret (1938)
Screenwriter
The Crime of Doctor Hallet (1938)
Screenwriter
Secrets of a Nurse (1938)
Screenwriter
Midnight Intruder (1938)
Screenwriter
The Jury's Secret (1938)
Original Story
The Crime of Doctor Hallet (1938)
Original Story
His Exciting Night (1938)
Contract Writer
The Crime of Dr. Hallett (1938)
Screenwriter
The Crime of Dr. Hallett (1938)
From Story
Some Blondes Are Dangerous (1937)
Screenwriter
Affairs of Cappy Ricks (1937)
Original Screenplay
The Man in Blue (1937)
Screenwriter
Behind the Mike (1937)
Contract Writer
Carnival Queen (1937)
Contract Writer
The President's Mystery (1936)
Screenwriter
Follow Your Heart (1936)
Screenwriter
Too Tough to Kill (1935)
Screenwriter
Hitch Hike Lady (1935)
Screenwriter
Under Pressure (1935)
Screenwriter
The Daring Young Man (1935)
Contr to trmt
Dante's Inferno (1935)
Contr to trmt
Sleepers East (1934)
Screenwriter
Pursued (1934)
Screenwriter
Wild Gold (1934)
Screenwriter
3 on a Honeymoon (1934)
Contract Writer
Charlie Chan in London (1934)
Contr to Screenplay const and dial
Walls of Gold (1933)
Screenwriter
Charlie Chan's Greatest Case (1933)
Screenwriter
If I Had a Million (1932)
Contract Writer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Inside North Vietnam (1967)
Editorial consultant

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Hollywood On Trial (1976)
Other

Life Events

1929

Feature acting debut, "Painted Faces"

1932

First screenplay, "If I Had a Million"

1944

First on-screen appearace in fourteen years, "South of Dixie"

1947

Final screenplay credit before he was blacklisted, "The Romance of Rosy Ridge"

1961

Returned to screenwriting under the pseudonym Lewis Coppley with "Operation Eichmann"

1976

Final film appearance, as himself, in "Hollywood on Trial"

Videos

Movie Clip

High Wall (1947) - You'll Escape Reality Brain trauma patient, war vet and dad Kenet (Robert Taylor), institutionalized for killing his wife and believing he's guilty, with guard Delaney (Ray Mayer) then doctor Ann Lorrison (Audrey Totter), complex tensions in director Curtis Bernhardt's High Wall, 1947.
High Wall (1947) - Youre Not Getting Out After successful brain surgery which he long resisted, war vet and father Kenet (Robert Taylor), still believing he killed his wife, seeks release, doctors Lorrison (Audrey Totter), Poward (Warner Anderson) and especially Dunlap (Moroni Olsen) evaluating, in High Wall, 1947.
Romance Of Rosy Ridge, The (1947) - Rakin' Oats Drifter Henry (Van Johnson) charming all with a song and work in the fields, with Lissy Anne (Janet Leigh), her mother (Selena Royle), and father (Thomas Mitchell), still vexed over his loyalties in the recently-ended Civil War, in The Romance Of Rosy Ridge, 1947.
Romance Of Rosy Ridge, The (1947) - News Of Ben Burning map, quasi-Klansmen, and a camera turn under a bonnet begins Janet Leigh's movie career, as "Lissy Anne," misinterpreting a message from "Ninny Nat" (O.Z. Whitehead), opening MGM's The Romance Of Rosy Ridge, 1947.
High Wall (1947) - He Was So Anxious To See Her Director Curtis Bernhardt with tight control of his opening, finding businessman Whitcombe (Herbert Marshall) in a bar, with his assistant (Eula Guy) at the office, then a freaky introduction of leading man Robert Taylor, in High Wall, 1947, co-starring Audrey Totter.
High Wall (1947) - Tell Me About Those Headaches Brain-injured combat vet Kenet (Robert Taylor) taken to his cell, convinced he must have killed his wife, while doctors (Morris Ankrum, Moroni Olsen, Warner Anderson and Audrey Totter as Ann Lorrison) stick to prodecure, early in director Curtis Bernhardt's High Wall, 1947.
Objective, Burma! - I Froze In The Door Before the big jump, Captain Nelson (Errol Flynn) first with reporter Williams (Henry Hull), then with Gabby (George Tobias) and worried comrade Miggleori (Tony Caruso), in Raoul Walsh's Objective, Burma!, 1945.
Objective, Burma! - Burmese Dancing Girls Errol Flynn as American army captain Nelson, laying out the mission for his paratroopers (Tony Caruso, Richard Erdman, George Tynes et al) and meeting crusty reporter Williams (Henry Hull), early in Raoul Walsh's Objective, Burma!, 1945.

Trailer

Bibliography

"Hollywood Red"
Lester Cole

Notes

In 1997, the Writers Guild of America restored credit to several blacklisted writers, including Cole. Among the films that had the credits changed were "Born Free" (1966) which Cole scripted under the pseudonym Gerald L C Copley.