Tony Lobianco


Actor

About

Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
October 19, 1936

Biography

A dark, intense leading man and character player, Tony Lo Bianco has honed his blue-collar, urban tough guy persona on stage as well as before the cameras. His theater work has included an OBIE-winning turn as fading baseball star Duke Bronkowsky in the American Place Theatre's production of "Yanks-3, Detroit-0, Top of the Seventh" (1975-76). Lo Bianco also received an Outer Critics Circ...

Biography

A dark, intense leading man and character player, Tony Lo Bianco has honed his blue-collar, urban tough guy persona on stage as well as before the cameras. His theater work has included an OBIE-winning turn as fading baseball star Duke Bronkowsky in the American Place Theatre's production of "Yanks-3, Detroit-0, Top of the Seventh" (1975-76). Lo Bianco also received an Outer Critics Circle Award and a Tony nomination for his starring turn in the 1983 revival of Arthur Miller's "A View from the Bridge" and garnered abundant praise for his portrayal of Fiorello LaGuardia in the one-man show "Hizzoner!," which was adapted for public television in 1984.

TV has frequently tagged him as a cop (e.g., Sergeant DiAngelo on NBC's "Police Story," 1973-77; Detective Rick Massi in the NBC telefilm "Mr. Inside, Mr. Outside," 1973; Lieutenant Alex Ascoli in the short-lived ABC series "Jessie," 1984-85), but he put his boxing experience to good use to play Rocky Marciano in the 1979 ABC movie "Marciano." Additionally, he appeared in two biblical productions, first as Joseph in the ABC movie "Jacob and Joseph" (1974) and later as Quintilius in the NBC miniseries "Jesus of Nazareth" (1977).

In films, he has often crossed to the other side of the street to play criminals like the over-ambitious Mafioso Sal Boca in the Academy Award-winning "The French Connection" (1971) and the mob boss in "The Juror" (1996). One of his finest performances came in the starring role of Joe, a successful contractor trapped in a web of municipal patronage and corruption, in John Sayles' "City of Hope" (1991).

Lo Bianco has helmed episodes of "Police Story," "Kaz" (CBS, 1978-79) and "The Duke" (NBC, 1978-79) and also directed the feature film, "Too Scared to Scream" (1985), starring Anne Archer, Ian McShane and John Heard. Founder and artistic director of NYC's Triangle Theatre, he directed eight productions over a span of six years, while producing 25 shows. Fans of the defunct CBS daytime serial "Love of Life" may also recall him as Joseph Corelli.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Too Scared to Scream (1982)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Kill the Irishman (2011)
The Day the Ponies Come Back (2001)
Friends and Family (2001)
Rocky Marciano (1999)
Mafia! (1998)
The Pawn (1998)
Sworn to Justice (1997)
The Juror (1996)
Tyson (1995)
Nixon (1995)
The Ascent (1994)
Boiling Point (1993)
Stormy Weathers (1992)
Teamster Boss: The Jackie Presser Story (1992)
In the Shadow of a Killer (1992)
City of Hope (1991)
10 Million Dollar Getaway (1991)
Perry Mason: The Case of the Poisoned Pen (1990)
Body of Evidence (1988)
The Ann Jillian Story (1988)
Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987)
Blood Ties (1986)
Welcome Home, Bobby (1986)
Lady Blue (1985)
City Heat (1984)
Another Woman's Child (1983)
Separate Ways (1981)
Champions: A Love Story (1979)
Marciano (1979)
A Last Cry for Help (1979)
Last Tenant (1978)
Magee and the Lady (1978)
F.I.S.T. (1978)
Bloodbrothers (1978)
Goldenrod (1977)
God Told Me To (1976)
A Shadow in the Streets (1975)
The Story of Jacob and Joseph (1974)
Mr. Inside/Mr. Outside (1973)
The Seven Ups (1973)
The Honeymoon Killers (1970)
Ray Fernandez

Cast (Special)

The Engagement Ring (2005)
Malcolm Takes a Shot (1990)
Over the Limit (1990)
Off Duty (1988)
Battle of the Network Stars XVII (1984)
Hizzoner! (1984)
Pals (1981)
Circus of the Stars (1979)
Circus of the Stars (1977)
A Memory of Two Mondays (1974)

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Mary Higgins Clark's Let Me Call You Sweetheart (1997)
Bella Mafia (1997)
Sidney Sheldon's "The Sands of Time" (1992)
The First Circle (1991)
Marco Polo (1982)
Jesus of Nazareth (Do Not Use) (1977)
Origins of the Mafia (1974)

Life Events

1963

Founded Triangle Theatre; artistic director for six years, directing eight productions, producing 25

1966

Broadway debut in "The Office"

1971

Played supporting role in the Academy Award-winning "The French Connection"

1973

Had a recurring role as Sergeant DiAngelo on "Police Story"; also directed episodes

1973

TV-movie debut in "Mr. Inside/Mr. Outside" (NBC)

1974

Co-starred with Harvey Keitel and Jerry Stiller in Arthur Miller's "A Memory of Two Mondays" for PBS

1975

Portrayed the fading baseball star Duke Bronkowsky in American Place Theatre's production of "Yanks-3, Detroit-0, Top of the Seventh"

1978

Directed series TV episodes of "Kaz" (CBS)

1983

Won critical acclaim for his starring turn in a revival of Arthur Miller's "A View from the Bridge"

1984

Played Lt. Alex Ascoli on the short-lived ABC series, "Jessie"

1991

Portrayed Vincent Spano's father in John Sayles' "City of Hope"

1991

Starred as Arturo Taft on the short-lived CBS series, "The Palace Guard"

1995

Had recurring role on the NBC police drama "Homicide: Life on the Streets"

1996

Appeared as a mob boss in "The Juror," starring Alec Baldwin and Demi Moore

Videos

Movie Clip

Honeymoon Killers, The (1969) -- (Movie Clip) I Want You To Call Me Ray Cutting from Martha (Shirley Stoler) in Mobile, beginning her first letter to the lonely-hearts service, we meet Raymond (Tony Lo Bianco) in New York, beginning their correspondence, in The Honeymoon Killers, 1969, written and directed by Leonard Kastle.
Honeymoon Killers, The (1969) -- (Movie Clip) Now That You Know Everything Arriving from Mobile at her own insistence in New York, Martha (Shirley Stoler) causes Raymond (Tony Lo Bianco) to admit his scam then, unbowed, returns to confront her supervisor (Guy Sorel), to whom she then lies, in writer-director Leonard Kastle's fact-based The Honeymoon Killers, 1969.
Bloodbrothers (1978) -- (Movie Clip) Take A Run At Old Three Finger Profane scene introducing Richard Gere as “Stony” De Coco of The Bronx, fuming mad as he watches Cheri (Kristine DeBell) dance at a disco, with Marilu Henner the waitress, Ron McLarty the bouncer, and Kim Milford his buddy Butler, early in Bloodbrothers, 1978, starring Tony LoBianco and Paul Sorvino as his father and uncle.
Bloodbrothers (1978) -- (Movie Clip) Just Do What I Tell You After numerous colorful events in the opening scenes the night before, a fleshy and tense domestic events with Tony LoBianco as Bronx construction worker Tommy, Richard Gere his elder son, Leila Goldoni his wife, and Michael Hershewe his lilttle brother, in Bloodbrothers, 1978, from the Richard Price novel.
Bloodbrothers (1978) -- (Movie Clip) Cats Are Ancient Souls After a long credit sequence, the sun setting with an aerial trip over The Bronx, director Robert Mulligan lands in the bar run by Banion (Kenneth McMillan) where we meet Tony LoBianco as Tommy, waiting on Paul Sorvino as brother “Chubby,” and Gloria LeRoy as floozy Sylvia, in Bloodbrothers, 1978, with lots of swearing, from the Richard Price novel.
Seven-Ups, The (1973) -- (Movie Clip) We Used To Swim Here Producer-Director Philip D’Antoni, who also produced The French Connection, 1971, brings leading man Roy Scheider (co-star of of that film) as cop Buddy to meet childhood pal Vito (Tony LoBianco, who was also the informant in the previous film), early in The Seven-Ups, 1973.
French Connection, The (1971) -- (Movie Clip) They're All Cousins! New York cops Popeye (Gene Hackman) and Cloudy (Roy Scheider), at the Copacabana, with The Three Degrees performing a Jimmy Webb Song, can't help noticing gangsters, especially Sal Boca (Tony Lo Bianco) and decide to give chase, in an early scene from William Friedkin's The French Connection, 1971.
God Told Me To (1976) -- (Movie Clip) You Mad At Somebody? After a messy opening Manhattan sniper sequence, police official Mike Kellin comments and we meet Tony LoBianco as detective Nicholas, doing what he can with the water-tower shooter (Sammy Williams), Jo Flores Chase the mom, in writer-director-producer Larry Cohen’s God Told Me To, 1976.
God Told Me To (1976) -- (Movie Clip) Where Is All The Joy? Traumatized after a sniper incident, New York cop Nicholas (Tony LoBianco), who’s just promised his Manhattan girlfriend that he’ll get out of his marriage, visits his wife (Sandy Dennis) in Long Island, where she makes it clear that he’s the spooky one, in Larry Cohen’s God Told Me To, 1976.
God Told Me To (1976) -- (Movie Clip) Stop The Parade? New York writer-director Larry Cohen shoots the St. Patrick’s Day parade, as weirded-out detective Nicholas (Tony LoBianco) tells his boss (Mike Kellin) there’s going to be a shooting, and now-legendary comic Andy Kaufman has a bit as the crazed cop, in the horror-mystery hybrid God Told Me To, 1976.

Trailer

Bibliography