Suzanne Clément


Biography

A gifted actress drawn to challenging projects, Suzanne Clément specialized in bringing out the humanity in her frequently quirky and unconventional characters. Born in 1968, Suzanne Clément went from the teen-powered series "Watatatow" (Radio-Canada, 1991-2005) to a Gémeaux-nominated performance on the revamped version of the soap opera "Sous le signe du lion" (Radio-Canada, 1997-2001)....

Photos & Videos

The Fallen Idol - Movie Poster
Remorques - Movie Poster
Higher and Higher - Lobby Cards

Biography

A gifted actress drawn to challenging projects, Suzanne Clément specialized in bringing out the humanity in her frequently quirky and unconventional characters. Born in 1968, Suzanne Clément went from the teen-powered series "Watatatow" (Radio-Canada, 1991-2005) to a Gémeaux-nominated performance on the revamped version of the soap opera "Sous le signe du lion" (Radio-Canada, 1997-2001). She earned Genie and Jutra Award nominations for her work as the pregnant, frustrated girlfriend of a blue-collar aspiring actor (Luc Picard) in "L'audition" (2005) and another Gémeaux nomination for the quirky sitcom "Cover Girl" (Radio-Canada, 2005), but many critics singled out her Best Actress Jutra-nominated turn as the shrewd, manipulative mother of a trouble boy (Antoine L'Écuyer) in the internationally acclaimed "C'est pas moi, je le jure!" ("It's Not Me, I Swear!") (2008). Clément's star shone even brighter when she landed her own series, playing the titular character in "Les hauts et les bas de Sophie Paquin" (Radio-Canada, 2006-09), a rising professional who must balance the ups and downs of life and love with her demanding career. Bringing warmth and intelligence to the role, the actress charmed audiences and critics alike, and won two Best Actress Gémeaux Awards for her iconic turn. When the series ended, Clément earned a Best Actress Jutra nomination for "Tromper le silence" (2010) and won a special acting award from the Cannes Film Festival for her sensitive portrayal of a woman whose fiancé wants a sex-change operation in Xavier Dolan's "Laurence Anyways" (2012).

By Jonathan Riggs

Life Events

Photo Collections

The Fallen Idol - Movie Poster
Here is the 1-sheet movie poster from the American release of the British film The Fallen Idol (1948), starring Ralph Richardson. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Remorques - Movie Poster
Here is an original French movie poster for Remorques (1941), starring Jean Gabin, Madeleine Renaud, and Michele Morgan.
Higher and Higher - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from RKO's Higher and Higher (1943), featuring Frank Sinatra. Sinatra filmed a supporting role for the film, but his fame was so great by the time the movie was released, the studio billed it as "The Sinatra Show."

Videos

Movie Clip

Higher And Higher (1943) - Disgustingly Rich Jack Haley leads the staff in a song from the Rodgers and Hart Broadway show, about the plan to launch maid Michele Morgan as a debutante, with Mary Wickes, young Mel Tormè, Marcy McGuire, Paul Hartman, Grace Hartman, Ivy Scott, Leon Errol, early in Higher And Higher, 1943.
Passage To Marseille (1944) - Until We Meet Again Following a prologue about the Free French Air Squadron, impressive machinery action from director Michael Curtiz, fleeting introduction of Humphrey Bogart (as "Matrac") and Michele Morgan as his wife, from Passage To Marseille, 1943, also starring Claude Rains.
Port Of Shadows (1939) - No One Likes My Face Panama (Edouard Delmont), at his waterfront hide-out, has just repelled gunmen who, he learns, were after Zabel (Michel Simon) who happens to be the guardian of Nelly (Michele Morgan) who, with deserter Jean (Jean Gabin), is among the outcasts on hand, in Marcel Carne's Port Of Shadows, 1939.
Passage To Marseille (1944) - I Accuse Daladier At Devil's Island, "Grandpere" (Vladimir Sokoloff) sizing up Renault, Marius et al (Philip Dorn, Peter Lorre, George Tobias, Helmut Dantine), who tell back-story on their comrade Matrac (Humphrey Bogart), appearing with wife-to-be Paula (Michele Morgan), in Passage To Marseilles, 1944.
ItalianAmerican (1974) - Kid Stuff Conversation following recounting of their long delayed honeymoon in Italy, the director's parents Charles and Catherine remembering the Little Italy of their childhood, in Martin Scorsese's ItalianAmerican, 1974.
ItalianAmerican (1974) - How I Make The Sauce Director Martin Scorsese's opening, his parents Charles and Catherine introduced, talking about tomato sauce and families, from ItalianAmerican, 1974.

Bibliography