Jean-claude Carriere


Playwright, Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
France
Born
September 19, 1931

Biography

A prolific, highly accomplished French playwright and screenwriter, Jean-Claude Carriere is perhaps best recalled for his two decade association with Luis Bunuel during which he contributed to the screenplays of such classics as "The Diary of a Chambermaid" (1964), "Belle du Jour" (1968), "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie" (1972) and "That Obscure Object of Desire" (1976). In additi...

Family & Companions

Nicole Carriere
Wife
Had six children.
Nicole Carriere
Wife
Painter, interior decorator.
Hanna Schygulla
Companion
Miner.
Hanna Schygulla
Companion
Actor.

Bibliography

"L'Alliance"
Jean-Claude Carriere (1963)
"Le Lezard"
Jean-Claude Carriere (1957)
"Le Petit Napoleon illustre"
Jean-Claude Carriere and Pierre Etaix

Biography

A prolific, highly accomplished French playwright and screenwriter, Jean-Claude Carriere is perhaps best recalled for his two decade association with Luis Bunuel during which he contributed to the screenplays of such classics as "The Diary of a Chambermaid" (1964), "Belle du Jour" (1968), "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie" (1972) and "That Obscure Object of Desire" (1976). In addition, the writer has enjoyed profitable associations with such top talent as Jacques Deray, Milos Forman, Louis Malle, Volker Schlondorff, Jean-Paul Rappeneau, Andrzej Wajda and Peter Brook, often adapting plays and novels. Adept at a variety of genres, he excels at producing screenplays that demonstrate an acerbic but amused point of view.

A farmer's son who was born and raised in a small village in France, Carriere moved to Paris in the waning days of World War II to pursue his academic studies. By the end of the 1950s, he had published his first novel ("Le Lezard" 1957) and had been introduced to the world of film by Pierre Etaix, with whom he formed his first collaborative relationship. Etaix was a protege of Jacques Tati and Carriere was hired to write the novelizations of such Tati films as "M. Hulot's Holiday" and "Mon Oncle." As the 60s progressed Carriere moved into filmmaking in tandem with Etaix, co-producing, co-writing and co-directing short films including the 1962 Oscar-winner "Heureux Anniversaire/Happy Anniversary." Two years later, Carriere began his notable working relationship with Bunuel, then in his 60s and considered to be on the decline. Their pairing re-invigorated the surrealism of the older man, infusing his work with irony, paradox and a renewed sense of comedy. "The Diary of a Chambermaid," a remake of Jean Renoir's 1946 original, was a searing look at the bourgeoisie in the fascist milieu of 1939 as filtered through the eyes of the family maid (played by Jeanne Moreau). "Belle du Jour" was a wry examination of an uptight newlywed (Catherine Deneuve) who finds a curious liberation in working a day shift at a brothel. Their symbiotic affiliation perhaps reached its apotheosis with "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie," and their final effort, "That Obscure Object of Desire," both of which garnered Academy Award nominations for their screenplays.

After Bunuel's death, Carriere forged a similar working relationship in the theater with Peter Brook. "The Tragedy of Carmen," their reworking of Bizet's opera "Carmen," proved a hit in its Paris and New York stagings and was captured for posterity on film in 1983. The duo later worked on "The Conference of the Birds" in 1982 and in 1987 on the formidable staging of "The Mahabharta" (filmed for British television in 1989).

If Carriere had only worked with Bunuel and Brook, his place in history would be assured, yet those films and plays represent only a part of his astonishing output. Carriere twice collaborated with Louis Malle, most notably on "Le Voleur/The Thief of Paris" (1967). In 1966. he was introduced to Milos Forman who later tapped the writer for assistance on "Taking Off" (1971) and "Valmont" (1989), which some found a more faithful rendering of Choderlos de Laclos' "Les Liaisons dangereuses." Carriere also contributed to the popular French comedy "L'Associe/The Associate" and teamed with Jean-Luc Godard for the somewhat overrated "Sauve qui puet la vie/Every Man for Himself" (both 1979). The screenwriter also proved his mettle joining Volker Schlondorff, Franz Seitz and Gunter Grass in adapting Grass' award-winning novel "The Tin Drum" (also 1979) to film. One of the most memorable films of the 70s and an Oscar-winner for Best Foreign-Language Film, "The Tin Drum" focused on a young boy who refused to grow up when the Nazis assumed power and included one memorable sequence after another. Yet, the film has been subjected to attacks on grounds of obscenity by right-wing groups over one suggestive scene of a sexual nature.

The 80s saw Carriere reach audiences with such diverse adaptations as "Le Retour de Martin Guerre/The Return of Martin Guerre" and "Danton" (both 1982), which both starred Gerard Depardieu. The former, co-written with director Daniel Vigne, earned a Cesar for its mystery of a man returning from war and claiming to be the title character while the latter allowed Andrzej Wajda to draw parallels between France's Reign of Terror and contemporary Poland. He and Brook were two of the credited screenwriters of the opulent but bloodless Proust adaptation "Swann in Love" (1984), directed by Schlondorff. Carriere shared his third Oscar nomination in 1988 for screenwriting with Philip Kaufman for their affecting version of Milan Kundera's erotic and powerful novel "The Unbearable Lightness of Being."

Carriere found a new partner in Jean-Paul Rappeneau with whom he collaborated on what has been called the definitive film version of Rostand's classic "Cyrano de Bergerac" (1990), which showcased Depardieu's towering lead performance. Although he stumbled somewhat with the English-language "At Play in the Fields of the Lord" (1991 -- generally conceded to be an unfilmable work), the screenwriter was back on surer ground with his second teaming with Rappeneau on the lavish period drama "Le Hussard sur le toit/The Horseman on the Roof" (1995) as well as Schlondorff's "The Ogre" (1996), an often overlooked gem. His last produced screenplay to date, "Chinese Box" (1998), though, was another disappointment with an almost anachronistic juxtaposition of a triangular romance set against the waning days of British rule in Hong Kong.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

L' Unique (1985)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Carrière 250 meters (2011)
Certified Copy (2010)
Avida (2006)
Bunuel, King Solomon (2001)
David Goldman
Regarding Bunuel (2000)
Jaya Ganga (1996)
Professor
The Night & the Moment (1994)
Gouverneur
Ils sont grands ces petits (1979)
Psychiatre
Photo Souvenir (1977)
Le Jardin des Supplices (1976)
Serieux comme le plaisir (1975)

Writer (Feature Film)

At Eternity's Gate (2018)
Screenplay
A Bigger Splash (2016)
Writer
The Patience Stone (2012)
Writer
El Artista y la Modelo (2012)
Screenplay
Carrière 250 meters (2011)
Screenplay
The White Ribbon (2009)
Screenplay
Goya's Ghosts (2007)
Screenplay
Ulzhan (2007)
Screenplay
Marie-Antoinette (2006)
Writer
Birth (2004)
Screenwriter
Bunuel, King Solomon (2001)
Screenplay Collaboration
La Guerre dans le Haut-Pays (1999)
Screenwriter
Chinese Box (1997)
From Story
Chinese Box (1997)
Screenwriter
The Ogre (1996)
Screenplay
The Horseman on the Roof (1995)
Screenplay
The Night & the Moment (1994)
Screenwriter
Sommersby (1993)
From Story
L'Otage de l'Europe (1992)
French Adaptation
L'Otage de l'Europe (1992)
Screenplay
Le Retour de Casanova (1992)
Screenplay
At Play In The Fields Of The Lord (1991)
Screenplay
May Fools (1990)
Screenplay
Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)
Screenwriter
Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)
Adaptation
Bengali Nights (1989)
Screenwriter
Hard to Be a God (1989)
Screenwriter
J'ecris dans l'espace (1989)
Screenwriter
Jeniec Europy (1989)
Screenplay (Translations)
The Mahabharata (1989)
Screenplay
The Mahabharata (1989)
Writer (Adaptation)
Valmont (1989)
Screenwriter
Les Possedes (1988)
Screenplay
The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)
Screenplay
Les Exploits d'un jeune Don Juan (1987)
Screenwriter
Max mon amour (1986)
Screenplay
The Wolf At The Door (1986)
From Story
L' Unique (1985)
Screenwriter
Swann in Love (1984)
Screenplay
La Jeune fille et l'enfer (1984)
Screenwriter
Le General de l'Armee Morte (1983)
Screenwriter
La Tragedie de Carmen (1983)
Screenplay
Antonieta (1982)
Screenwriter
Itineraire Bis (1982)
Screenwriter
The Indiscretion (1982)
Screenwriter
Circle Of Deceit (1982)
Screenwriter
The Return of Martin Guerre (1982)
Screenplay
Danton (1982)
Screenplay
Every Man For Himself (1980)
Screenwriter
The Tin Drum (1979)
Screenwriter
Retour a la Bien-Aimee (1979)
Screenwriter
The Associate (1979)
Screenwriter
Retour a la Bien-Aimee (1979)
Dialogue
Ils sont grands ces petits (1979)
Screenwriter
The Angry Man (1979)
Screenplay
Chaussette Surprise (1978)
Writer (Dialogue)
Chaussette Surprise (1978)
Screenplay
Un Papillon sur l'Epaule (1978)
Screenwriter
That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
Dialogue
Julie pot de colle (1977)
Screenplay
Photo Souvenir (1977)
Screenplay
Le Gang (1977)
Screenwriter
That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
Screenwriter
Le Diable dans la boite (1977)
Screenplay
That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
Adaptation
La Faille (1975)
Screenwriter
Leonor (1975)
Screenwriter
Les Oeufs Brouilles (1975)
Screenplay
Serieux comme le plaisir (1975)
Screenplay
Un Amour de pluie (1974)
Screenwriter
The Phantom of Liberty (1974)
Screenplay
La Chair de l'orchidee (1974)
Screenplay
France Societe Anonyme (1974)
Screenwriter
Dorothea's Rache (1973)
Screenwriter
The Outside Man (1973)
Screenwriter
Le Moine (1973)
Screenwriter
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
Screenwriter
Un Peu de soleil dans l'eau froide (1971)
Screenwriter
La Cagna (1971)
Screenwriter
Le grand amour (1969)
Screenplay
As Long as You've Got Your Health (1966)
Writer
Attack of the Robots (1962)
Writer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

The Bunuel Paradox (1997)
Other
Max mon amour (1986)
Other

Cast (Special)

Milos Forman: Portrait (1989)

Director (Short)

Rupture (1962)
Director
Happy Anniversary (1962)
Director

Writer (Short)

Rupture (1962)
Writer
Happy Anniversary (1962)
Writer

Life Events

1945

Arrived in Paris to study literature and history just before the end of WWII

1957

Began collaboration with Pierre Etaix

1961

Made directorial debut as co-helmer (with Etaix) of the short film "Rupture"

1962

Co-produced (with Etaix) the Oscar-winning short "Heureux Anniversaire/Happy Anniversary"

1962

Feature film screenwriting debut, "Le Soupirant/The Suitor", directed by Etaix

1964

First collaboration with Luis Bunuel, "Le Journal d'une femme de chambre/Diary of a Chambermaid"; also made screen acting debut in film

1965

First collaboration with Louis Malle, "Viva Maria!"

1967

Scripted "Belle du Jour", directed by Bunuel

1967

Reunited with Malle for "Le Voleur/The Thief of Paris"

1967

First English language screenwriting credit, "Hotel Paradiso"

1968

Wrote play "L'Aide-Memoire"; produced on Broadway as "The Little Black Book" in 1972

1969

Initial collaboration with director Jacques Deray, "The Swimming Pool/Basseinut/La Piscine"

1970

Contributed to the script of Deray's gangster drama "Borsalino"

1971

Collaborated with Milos Forman on "Taking Off"

1971

Wrote "A Little Sun in Cold Water/Un Peu de soleil dans l'eau froide", featuring Gerard Depardieu

1972

With Bunuel, co-wrote "Le Charm discret de la bourgeiosie/The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie"; nominated for Best Original Screenplay

1974

Reteamed with Bunuel for "La Fantome de la liberte/The Phantom of Liberty"

1975

Penned screenplay of "Leonor", directed by Jean-Luis Bunuel

1977

Shared an Academy Award nomination for Best Screenplay for "That Obscure Object of Desire/Cet obscure objet du desir"; final film with Luis Bunuel

1979

Co-wrote the award-winning adaptation of "The Tin Drum", directed by Volker Schlondorff

1979

Contributed to the script for the popular French comedy "L'Associe/The Associate"

1979

Collaborated with Jean-Luc Godard on "Sauve qui peut la vie/Every Man for Himself"

1981

Earned widespread praise for his collaboration with Peter Brook on the stage play "La Tragedie de Carmen/The Tragedy of Carmen"; filmed in 1983

1982

Wrote the stage play "The Conference of Birds" in collaboration with Peter Brook

1982

Co-wrote "Le Retour de Martin Guerre/The Return of Martin Guerre", starring Gerard Depardieu

1982

Made contributions to the script of Andrzej Wajda's historical drama "Danton", starring Depardieu

1984

Reunited with Schlondorff to adapt Proust's "Swann in Love/Un Amour de Swann"; Peter Brook also was one of the credited scenarists

1985

With Olivier Assayas, co-directed feature film "L'Unique"; also worked on screenplay

1987

Second collaboration with Wajda, "The Possessed/Les Possedes"

1988

Collaborated with director Philip Kaufman on the screen version of Milan Kundera's novel "The Unbearable Lightness of Being"; shared a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar nomination

1989

With Peter Brook, adapted Brook's acclaimed staging of "The Mahabharta" as a miniseries for British television; eventually aired in the USA

1989

Reunited with Forman to adapt "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" as "Valmont"

1990

Worked with Jean-Paul Rappeneau on the definitive "Cyrano de Bergerac", starring Depardieu

1991

Contributed to the screenplay of "At Play in the Fields of the Lord", directed by Hector Babenco

1995

Adapted "Le Hussard sur le toit/The Horseman on the Roof" for Rappeneau; Depardieu had small role in film

1996

Wrote screenplay for "Le Roi des aulnes/The Ogre", directed by Schlondorff

1998

Wrote screenplay for "Chinese Box", directed by Wayne Wang

1999

Stage play "La Terrasse" opened Off-Broadway

2007

Reunited with Forman to script "Goya's Ghosts"

Videos

Movie Clip

Hotel Paradiso (1966) - Difficulty In Speaking Aspiring philanderer Boniface (Alec Guinness) is pleased to hear his wife (Peggy Mount) will be out for the evening, their lawyer Martin (Douglas Byng) visiting Paris, presents a problem, early in director Peter Glenville's Hotel Paradiso, 1966, also starring Gina Lollobrigida.
Hotel Paradiso (1966) - He'd Be Crushed To Death On location in Paris, Peter Glenville has directed himself through the title sequence but not yet made clear he's playing the playwright Georges Feydeau, instead introducing his actors, Robert Morley, Gina Lollobrigida, Alec Guinness and Peggy Mount, opening Hotel Paradiso, 1966.
Hotel Paradiso (1966) - Even More Desirable Arriving at the Paris hotel for which the movie is named, Boniface (Alec Guinness) and Marcelle (Gina Lollobrigida) bring differing levels of enthusiasm to their first assignation, Akim Tamiroff their host, her husband (Robert Morley) also a guest, in Hotel Paradiso, 1966.
Le Grand Amour (1969) - Open, Tours Probably the only comedy that opens with an extended aerial shot and a wedding staged inside the historic Saint Gatiens Cathedral, at Tours, France, writer, director and star Pierre Etaix marrying his real-life wife Annie Fratellini, in Le Grand Amour, 1969.
Le Grand Amour (1969) - It Easily Becomes A Habit Still in his opening narrative taking place during his wedding, writer, director and star Pierre Etaix switches brides, baffles a waiter trapped in the flashback, and becomes entwined with Florence (Etaix's actual wife, Annie Fratellini), early in Le Grand Amour, 1969.
Belle De Jour (1967) - You Can Be Very Cruel A famous opening by director Luis Bunuel, using real time and sound to reveal both more and less than meets the eye, introducing young wife and husband Severine (Catherine Deneuve) and Pierre (Jean Sorel), from the celebrated Belle De Jour, 1967.
Belle De Jour (1967) - You Should See A Specialist Director Luis Bunuel shooting on location in Alpes-Maritimes, France, Severine (Catherine Deneuve), troubled with sexual frustration and fantasies, with husband Pierre (Jean Sorel) and friend Renee (Macha Meril), joined by her creepy boyfriend Husson (Michel Piccoli), early in Belle De Jour, 1967.
Belle De Jour (1967) - What's The Matter With You? Inexplicably seeking out a brothel at a Paris address provided to her by a scary friend, chaste housewife Severine (Catherine Deneuve) meets Madame Anais (Genevieve Page), with just a flash of fantasy from director Luis Bunuel, in Belle De Jour, 1967.
Belle De Jour (1967) - Most Of Those Are Called Remorse After her first shift as a prostitute, Severine (Catherine Deneuve) escapes a date with husband Pierre (Jean Sorel), imagines him with friend Husson (Michel Piccoli), and tells Anais (Genevieve Page) she'd like more work, director Luis Bunuel making it seem normal, in Belle De Jour, 1967.
Yoyo (1965) - October 24, 1929 After opening segments silent with sound effects, nearly 30-minutes into the film, the first narration, as the Great Depression reduces the prospects of "Le Millionaire," the director, writer and star Pierre Etaix, in his highly-regarded first feature, Yoyo, 1965.
Le Grand Amour (1969) - Ten Years Younger Writer, director and star Pierre Etaix as "Pierre," the bored husband having an affair with assistant Agnes (Nicole Calfan), with pal Jacques (Alain Janey) who has advice until his own wife appears in the cafe, in Le Grand Amour, 1969.
Le Grand Amour (1969) - As A Good Christian Now establishing his ennui as a near middle-aged husband and executive, writer, director and star Pierre Etaix imagines how word gets about town in Tours, France, in Le Grand Amour, 1969.

Trailer

Family

Felix Carriere
Father
Farmer.
Felix Carriere
Father
Has four older sisters and two older brothers.
Alice Carriere
Mother
Converted from Judiasm.
Iris Carriere
Daughter
Polish immigrant.

Companions

Nicole Carriere
Wife
Had six children.
Nicole Carriere
Wife
Painter, interior decorator.
Hanna Schygulla
Companion
Miner.
Hanna Schygulla
Companion
Actor.

Bibliography

"L'Alliance"
Jean-Claude Carriere (1963)
"Le Lezard"
Jean-Claude Carriere (1957)
"Le Petit Napoleon illustre"
Jean-Claude Carriere and Pierre Etaix