Alan Caillou


About

Birth Place
England, GB
Born
November 09, 1914
Died
October 01, 2006

Biography

Alan Caillou was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Caillou landed roles in various films, including "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1959) with Pat Boone, the dramatic adaptation "The Fiercest Heart" (1961) with Stuart Whitman and the adaptation "Five Weeks in a Balloon" (1962) with Red Buttons. He also appeared in the suspenseful adap...

Biography

Alan Caillou was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Caillou landed roles in various films, including "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1959) with Pat Boone, the dramatic adaptation "The Fiercest Heart" (1961) with Stuart Whitman and the adaptation "Five Weeks in a Balloon" (1962) with Red Buttons. He also appeared in the suspenseful adaptation "The List of Adrian Messenger" (1963) with George C Scott. He continued to act in productions like the comedy "Strange Bedfellows" (1965) with Rock Hudson, the comedy "Clarence, the Cross-Eyed Lion" (1965) with Marshall Thompson and "The Rare Breed" (1966). Film continued to be his passion as he played roles in "Assault On Agathon" (1976), "Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo" (1977) and the Lee Horsley action picture "The Sword and the Sorcerer" (1982). He also appeared in the Robert Urich comedic adventure "The Ice Pirates" (1984). Caillou last wrote "Cheetah" (1989) with Keith Coogan. Caillou passed away in October 2006 at the age of 92.

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion (1965) - I Was Rather Heroic Introducing the English tutor Rowbotham (Richard Haydn), a big character here but absent from the TV spinoff series Daktari, in the unspecified African colonial country (Kenya?), teen Paula (Cheryl Miller) and hero veterinarian dad “Marsh” Tracy (Marshall Thompson) manage the beasts, in Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion, 1965.
Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion (1965) - Call It Internal Strabismus First appearance for Betsy Drake, in her last movie before her retirement, as a Dian Fossey-inspired character, wildlife photographer-researcher Julie, who soon proceeds to the compound where friends “Marsh” Tracy (Marshall Thompson) and daughter (Cheryl Miller) have recently adopted the title character, in Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion, 1965.
Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion (1965) - He Can't Hunt Acting on reports of a lion marauding their settlements but not doing any harm, Marshall Thompson as Dr. Tracy, Cheryl Miller his daughter (later seen in the spinoff TV series Daktari, 1966-1969) and Rockne Tarkington as aide Juna discover the problem, in producer Ivan Tors’ Clarence, The Cross-Eyed Lion, 1965.
Village Of The Giants (1965) - Those Are My Ducks The Beau Brummels playing Woman (as produced by Sly Stone!) when two big ducks enter the club, Mike (Tommy Kirk) claiming credit, out-of-town kids (Joy Harmon, Beau Bridges, Tisha Sterling, Tim Rooney et al) duly impressed, in Village Of The Giants, 1965.
Village Of The Giants (1965) - Let's Dance! Visitors Fred (Beau Bridges), Merrie (Joy Harmon), Pete (Tim Rooney) and pals, now huge, having ingested "Goo" and dressed in fabric they found at the theater, drop by to torment locals, especially Horsey (Johnny Crawford), in Village Of The Giants, 1965.
Village Of The Giants (1965) - Call It Goo Mike (Tommy Kirk) and Nancy (Charla Doherty) had been making out when her little brother Genius (Ronny Howard) blew something up in the basement, wild results, early in Village Of The Giants, 1965.
Rampage (1963) - All Of Them Can Kill You Big game trapper Harry (Robert Mitchum) being briefed by hunter and expedition leader Otto (Jack Hawkins) on the plan to trap an exotic cat called the "Enchantress," suitably wowed when enchanting Anna (Elsa Martinelli) arrives, early in Rampage, 1963.
Rampage (1963) - Tuan Broke Promise Talib (Sabu) coordinating natives as trapper Harry (Robert Mitchum), with staffer Anna (Elsa Martinelli), oversees tiger capture, when hunter Otto (Jack Hawkins) gets carried away, irritating the chief (Stefan Schnabel), in Rampage, 1963.

Bibliography